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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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December 2010 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for December 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Surgical Team Training Can Improve Communication

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Team training interventions in the operating room (OR) may enhance communication among team members and result in improvements in outcomes such as complication rates, according to a report published in the December issue of the AORN Journal.

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Ticagrelor Reduces Total and Cardiovascular Mortality

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute coronary syndrome who undergo coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery after treatment with ticagrelor versus clopidogrel experience a substantial reduction in total and cardiovascular mortality without excess risk of CABG-related bleeding, according to a study published online Dec. 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Brain Under Anesthesia Is in Reversible Coma, Review Finds

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The brain under general anesthesia is not "asleep," but rather is in a state that is actually a reversible coma, according to a review article published in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Chronic Statin Use Reduces Post-Op Cardiovascular Events

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative statin therapy appears to reduce the risk of cardiac and vascular adverse events after major vascular surgery, as well as lowering the mortality risk in cases of major adverse events, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Married Status May Be Linked to Chance of New Kidney

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with end-stage renal disease, being married or divorced may be associated with better access to renal transplantation compared to being never married or being widowed, according to research published in the December issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Transfer Time Above Two Hours Not Tied to Adverse Effects

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Provider-determined transfer time that exceeds a mandated maximum of two hours may not result in poorer outcomes in trauma systems, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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STEMI Cardiac Outcomes Better With Primary PCI

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Following an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), along with the newer, adjunctive therapies enoxaparin and abciximab, have a lower combined mortality and recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) rate than those treated with thrombolytic therapy, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Racial Disparities in HCC Exist Regardless of Treatment

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have a higher rate of mortality than whites, Hispanics, and Asians after treatment for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and this disparity persists even after adjusting for various types of treatment and treatment benefit, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Apixaban May Beat Enoxaparin After Hip Replacement

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing hip replacement, thromboprophylaxis with apixaban, an orally active, specific factor Xa inhibitor, is associated with lower rates of venous thromboembolism than enoxaparin, according to a study published in the Dec. 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Protective Strategy Raises Number of Harvested Lungs

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a more protective ventilator strategy may increase the number of eligible and harvested lungs from potential organ donors with brain death, according to research published in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Proteinuria Predicts Renal Problems in Cardiac Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Proteinuria, detectable by a simple urine test performed before heart surgery, appears to be predictive of adverse renal outcomes, according to research published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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In Developing Nations, Health-Care-Related Infections High

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Developing countries experience a much higher burden of health-care-associated infection than do high-income nations, according to a meta-analysis published online Dec. 10 in The Lancet.

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Benefits of Radiotherapy in Breast Cancer Confirmed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- A long-term follow-up study has confirmed the effectiveness of radiotherapy in reducing the incidence of ipsilateral breast events and found that tamoxifen has a role in preventing local and contralateral new breast events for women with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The research has been published online Dec. 8 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Treatments Linked to Similar A-Fib Rates After Heart Surgery

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of metoprolol and amiodarone may result in similar rates of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Fecal Bacteria Post-RYGB Reflect Metabolic Change

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Intestinal microbiology rapidly changes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adapting to the starvation-like environment, with increases in some bacteria reflecting decreasing obesity-related inflammation and some changes differing by diabetes status, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Many Risks Related to Early Onset Scoliosis Treatments

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Surgically treating early onset scoliosis (EOS) with growing rods (GR) or vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) procedures may not fully control the deformity over a patient's entire growth period, and both procedures are beset with complications, according to a literature review published in the Dec. 1 issue of Spine.

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PERGLA Measures Changes After Eye-Pressure Surgery

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Pattern electroretinogram optimized for glaucoma screening (PERGLA) appears useful in measuring the reversal of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dysfunction following surgical treatment of intraocular pressure, according to research published in the December issue of Ophthalmology.

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Burnout Driving Away Many Emergency Physicians

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts between work and family and poor on-the-job teamwork contribute to burnout and drive many physicians, particularly emergency physicians, to want to leave their profession, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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