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Category: Internal Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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December 2010 Briefing - Internal Medicine

Last Updated: January 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Internal Medicine for December 2010. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Drug Insurance Coverage Not a Factor in Diabetes Control

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patient demographics, cardiometabolic health, ethnicity, and ongoing drug therapy contribute more to the care gap between patients with type 2 diabetes than access to private drug insurance coverage, according to a study published in the December issue of Diabetes Care.

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Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions Vary Regionally

THURSDAY, Dec. 30 (HealthDay News) -- While the overall rate of admissions for substance abuse treatment in the United States remained stable between 1998 and 2008, there were substantial variations between regions, according to a new Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) report published Dec. 23.

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ROI Production Tied to Survival in Granulomatous Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Disease severity and survival in patients with chronic granulomatous disease appear to be linked to the degree of residual reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI) production, which can be determined at diagnosis and used to guide treatment choices, according to research published in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Collaborative Intervention May Trump Usual Care

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Collaborative, coordinated management, in which a supervised nurse works in tandem with a patient's primary care physician to provide guideline-based care, appears to result in better disease and depression control and management in patients than usual care, according to research published in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Energy Drinks at Lower Doses May Help Reaction Times

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- An energy drink may improve individuals' reaction times, but improvements may dwindle with increasing doses, and acute caffeine consumption among adolescents has many effects that may be influenced by gender, according to two studies published in the December issue of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.

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Nasal Congestion May Point to More Severe Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Nasal congestion may be a sign of severe asthma, according to a study published online Nov. 26 in Respiratory Research.

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Well-Balanced Diet Linked to Improved Survival in Elderly

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A diet consisting of a high intake of low-fat dairy products, fruit, whole grains, poultry, fish, and vegetables appears to be associated with improved survival and quality of life among older adults, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Doubt Cast on Need for Some Esophageal Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is not warranted in younger white men with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or white women of any age with GERD symptoms, according to research published online Dec. 7 in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Prevalence High in Psoriasis Patients

TUESDAY, Dec. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The metabolic syndrome occurs substantially more frequently in people with psoriasis than in the general population, according to research published online Dec. 20 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Increases Risk of Hyperuricemia

FRIDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) who have hyperuricemia are at increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and sudden cardiac death, according to a report published in the Dec. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Primary Care Interventions Can Reduce Falls in Elderly

FRIDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A review and analysis of the literature suggests primary care-based interventions can reduce the number of falls suffered by the elderly; the research has been published in the Dec. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Negative Aspects of Social Relations Tied to Angina Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Negative aspects of social relations, including excessive demands and serious worries from significant others, children, or family members, appear to be risk factors for the development of angina pectoris, according to a study published online Dec. 22 in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Immunochemical Fecal Testing Speeds Cancer Detection

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients at high risk for colorectal cancer who undergo yearly fecal immunochemical tests (FITs) along with scheduled colonoscopies are likely to have neoplasia detected a median of 25 months earlier than colonoscopy alone, according to a study published in the December issue of Gastroenterology.

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Expanded Screening, Treatment Could Reduce New HIV Infections

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Expanding screening and treatment for HIV would likely reduce the rate of new infections, especially if combined with interventions that result in less risky behavior, according to research published in the Dec. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Placebos Without Deception Still Work in IBS

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The placebo effect appears to work in some irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients even when they know their treatment contains nothing more than an inert substance, according to research published online Dec. 22 in PLoS ONE.

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Fish Consumption Differences May Affect Stroke Disparities

THURSDAY, Dec. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The amount of fish consumed, and preferences for preparation (i.e., fried versus nonfried), vary regionally and by race and may be a factor behind disparities in stroke, according to research published online Dec. 22 in Neurology.

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Web-Based Shared Medical Records Useful for Sick Patients

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Web-based shared medical records (SMR) may provide an effective way for physicians to conduct non-visit-based health care, specifically for older individuals with diabetes, according to a report published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Fatty Acid Tied to Lower Diabetes and Dyslipidemia Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Higher levels of circulating trans-palmitoleate, which may result from consumption of whole-fat dairy products, appear to be associated with lower insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and incident diabetes, according to a study in the Dec. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Few Tie Tanning Bed Avoidance to Lower Skin Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Indoor tanning use is higher among women than men, but few individuals of either gender say that avoidance of tanning beds reduces skin cancer risk, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Corticosteroid Use May Increase Risk of Diabetes

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The use of inhaled corticosteroids among patients with respiratory disease appears to be associated with modest increases in the risk of diabetes onset and progression, according to a study published in the November issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Echinacea Unlikely Beneficial for Common Cold Symptoms

TUESDAY, Dec. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Echinacea does not appear to improve the duration or severity of the common cold, according to a study published in the Dec. 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Race, Economics Linked to Parkinsonism Outcomes

MONDAY, Dec. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Race and socioeconomic status appear to influence disease severity related to parkinsonism in patients treated at a tertiary Movement Disorders Center, according to research published online Dec. 13 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Colorectal Screening Reminders May Be Useful

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The use of colorectal cancer screening reminders may be effective in getting people to be screened, according to research published online Dec. 13 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Fat Distribution Tied to Higher Risk of ER-Negative Cancer

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Abdominal adiposity does not appear to play a significant role in the risk for premenopausal breast cancer overall, though it does seem to be associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative cancer, according to research published online Dec. 16 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences High

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A history of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) is commonly reported by adults, with more than half reporting at least one ACE, according to a report published in the Dec. 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Statement Stresses Importance of Exercise in Diabetes

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- People who engage in regular physical activity (PA) may reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and people with T2DM may reduce symptoms and complications and increase quality of life by participating in regular PA, according to a statement published in the December issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

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Death, Readmission Likely for Medicare Stroke Patients

FRIDAY, Dec. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Most Medicare beneficiaries discharged from the hospital after ischemic stroke either die or are rehospitalized within one year, according to a study published online Dec. 16 in Stroke.

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Sweet Drinks May Lead to Metabolic Syndrome, Type 2 DM

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Higher consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is associated with development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, according to research published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Report Addresses Vaccination Disparities in Older Adults

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Older African-Americans and Hispanics are much less likely than older whites to get vaccinated against influenza and pneumonia, according to a report by the American Lung Association, "Missed Opportunities: Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccination in Older Adults."

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Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Occupation

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Transportation workers and farm managers are among the occupational groups with the greatest risk for developing metabolic syndrome, according to research published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Statistics Update Finds CVD, Stroke Death Rates Declining

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Death rates from cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke fell in a recent period, but inpatient cardiovascular procedures rose at the same time and costs exerted a sizable burden compared to other conditions, according to updated statistics published online Dec. 15 in Circulation.

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48 Million Americans Acquire Foodborne Illnesses Annually

THURSDAY, Dec. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 48 million Americans acquire foodborne illnesses annually, with 128,000 becoming hospitalized and 3,000 dying each year as a result of the diseases, according to new estimates from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, published online Dec. 15 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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2009 H1N1 Vaccine Effective and Safe in Beijing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The PANFLU.1 vaccine, a monovalent split-virion vaccine of 15 µg of hemagglutinin antigen without adjuvant, appears to be safe and effective against H1N1 virus infection in school-age children in Beijing, according to a study published in the Dec. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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FDA Warns of Tainted Dietary Supplement Products

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expressed concern regarding undeclared or deceptively-labeled ingredients in products marketed as dietary supplements in a letter sent Dec. 15 to dietary supplement manufacturers.

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Different Opioids Linked to Different Risks of Events

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The risks of adverse events among older adults using opioid analgesics for nonmalignant pain varies by agent, according to research published in the Dec. 13/27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Walking Linked to Improved Metabolic Control in Type 2 DM

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with diabetes who walk with a trainer may improve their A1C score, need fewer medications, and improve their fasting blood glucose levels, according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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Vitamin D Levels Moderately Tied to Frailty Risk

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Low and elevated 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels appear to be moderately associated with a higher risk of frailty among older women, with lower 25(OH)D levels among non-frail women modestly associated with an elevated risk of incident frailty or death within a few years, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Obesity Prevalence Has Risen for All Socioeconomic Groups

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- By 2008, more than a third of adults and almost 17 percent of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 in the United States were obese, and obesity prevalence had risen among all income and education levels, according to research recently released by the National Center for Health Statistics at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Benzonatate Tied to Adverse Events in Young Children

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and consumers that ingestion of the cough suppressant benzonatate (Tessalon) in children younger than 10 years of age may result in serious adverse events or death.

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Staying Active May Prevent Middle-Aged Weight Gain

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Men and women who stay highly physically active as they transition from young adulthood to middle age appear to be less likely to experience substantial weight gain than their less active peers, according to research published in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems' Safety Questioned

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic cigarettes, known as electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), are poorly designed and labeled, leading to safety concerns which might merit removal from the market, according to research published online Dec. 7 in Tobacco Control.

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Articles Detail Drug Resistance Issues in H1N1 Influenza

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The detection of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses that are resistant to oseltamivir and adamantanes is a cause for concern, and an outbreak of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus occurred in the United Kingdom in late 2009, according to two articles published in the Jan. 1 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis Linked to Early Myocardial Infarction Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), individuals may face a rapidly increasing risk of myocardial infarction (MI), according to research published in the December issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Healthy Diet Tied to Reversion of Metabolic Syndrome

TUESDAY, Dec. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who adhere to a healthy diet may be able to reverse metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published in the November issue of Diabetes Care.

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For Treatment of Depression, Psychotherapy on the Decline

MONDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Two studies published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry address treatment of depression, with one study finding that use of psychotherapy has significantly decreased since 1998. The other study found that, for maintenance of remission, either pharmacotherapy or mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) should be continued.

Abstract - Marcus
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CVB1 Is Predominant Enterovirus Serotype Detected

MONDAY, Dec. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In 2007 and 2008, coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) was the predominant enterovirus serotype detected, with states in the South reporting the most serotyped enterovirus detections, according to research published in the Dec. 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Tailored Program Helps PAD Patients Quit Smoking

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in an intensive smoking cessation program tailored to help people with peripheral artery disease (PAD) appears to be an effective alternative to minimal care, according to research published in the Dec. 14/21 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Familial Alcoholism, Obesity Appear Linked

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- There is strong epidemiologic support for a link between familial alcoholism and obesity risk in women, with a less robust linkage found in men, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Rates of Drunk, Drugged Driving in U.S. Decline

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In the last year, 13.2 percent of those age 16 or older drove while under the influence of alcohol, and 4.3 percent drove while under the influence of illicit drugs, according to a recently released Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services (SAMHSA) report, the "National Survey on Drug Use and Health: State Estimates of Drunk and Drugged Driving."

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U.S. Falling Short on Women's Health Goals

FRIDAY, Dec. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In terms of women's health, the United States hasn't met a number of its goals, many of which are found on the Healthy People 2010 list, according to a new report from the National Women's Law Center and the Oregon Health & Science University.

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Death Rate in U.S. Down, but So Is Life Expectancy, Slightly

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Life expectancy has declined slightly in the United States, stroke is no longer the third leading cause of death, and heart disease and cancer still account for nearly half of U.S. deaths; these and other statistics can be found in a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, entitled "Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2008."

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Brief, Slight Exposure to Smoke Can Still Cause Damage

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Even very brief exposure to tobacco smoke may cause immediate damage that can have serious long-term consequences, according to a recently released Surgeon General's report, "How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease."

Press Release

Counseling May Lead to Some Improvement in Patient Health

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral counseling to improve diet or increase physical activity, provided at medium to high intensity, can lead to small improvements in patients' blood pressure, weight, and cholesterol, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Longer Anxiety Therapy Reduces Relapse Rate

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) treated with venlafaxine hydrochloride extended release (XR) for 12 months have substantially lower relapse rates when they stop the medication than patients who stop the medication after six months, according to a study in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Combining Statins and Fibrates Increases Rhabdomyolysis Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who are newly treated with statin-fibrate concurrent therapy are slightly more likely to be hospitalized with rhabdomyolysis than those who take just one of the medications, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Competency-Based Medical Education Faces Challenges

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Internal medicine training programs face a number of challenges while considering competency-based education and training, according to an article published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Secondhand Smoke Tied to Invasive Bacterial Disease

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) appears to be associated with the risk for invasive meningococcal disease, according to research published online Dec. 7 in PLoS Medicine.

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Benefit Seen From Smoking Cessation in PTSD Treatment

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Incorporating smoking cessation treatment into mental health care may improve abstinence rates for people with military-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to referral to specialized cessation treatment, according to research published in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low-Dose Aspirin May Not Hamper Fecal Blood Testing

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Among people screened with immunochemical fecal occult blood tests (iFOBTs), the tests may have higher sensitivity for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasms in those using low-dose aspirin, according to research published in the Dec. 8 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Treatments Linked to Similar A-Fib Rates After Heart Surgery

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of metoprolol and amiodarone may result in similar rates of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients who have undergone cardiac surgery, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Half of Elderly Males Consider Sex Important

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- About half of elderly men consider sex important, though only about one-third engage in sexual activity, according to research published in the Dec. 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Black Women at Markedly Higher Hypertension Risk

TUESDAY, Dec. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks -- women in particular -- are at a substantially increased risk of hypertension, and the incidence of hypertension in this population may contribute to geographic and racial differences in cardiovascular disease mortality, according to a study published online Dec. 6 in Hypertension.

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ECGs May Miss Heart Disease in Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women may not be able to rule out coronary heart disease (CHD) based on a normal electrocardiogram (ECG), according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Acute Myocardial Infarction Rise Linked to Economic Crisis

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- As the economy slowed in 2008 and 2009, the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) increased, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: Flu Outbreak in Georgia Signifies Start of Flu Season

MONDAY, Dec. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Georgia appears to be experiencing an influenza outbreak, mostly among school-aged children and caused by the influenza B strain, which can be well controlled with this season's influenza vaccine, according to a Dec. 3 press briefing by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Fecal Bacteria Post-RYGB Reflect Metabolic Change

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Intestinal microbiology rapidly changes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adapting to the starvation-like environment, with increases in some bacteria reflecting decreasing obesity-related inflammation and some changes differing by diabetes status, according to research published in the December issue of Diabetes.

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Updated Guidelines for the Prevention of Stroke Issued

FRIDAY, Dec. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association has released new guidelines for the primary prevention of strokes. The guidelines have been published online Dec. 2 in Stroke.

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High Stress of Crohn's Disease Associated With Flare-Ups

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) associated with the burden of having Crohn's disease appears to be linked to disease exacerbations, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in Frontline Gastroenterology.

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Chronic Pesticide Exposure Tied to Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic pesticide exposure appears to be associated with an increased risk of long-term cognitive decline and possibly evolution toward dementia, according to a study published online Nov. 22 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Repeated Miscarriage Spikes Heart Attack Risk

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have had more than three miscarriages have nearly nine times greater risk of having a myocardial infarction (MI) later in life than women who have not had a miscarriage, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in Heart.

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Burnout Driving Away Many Emergency Physicians

THURSDAY, Dec. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts between work and family and poor on-the-job teamwork contribute to burnout and drive many physicians, particularly emergency physicians, to want to leave their profession, according to a study published online Dec. 1 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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All-Cause Mortality Lowest With BMI of 20 to 24.9

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- All-cause mortality is lowest for adults with a body mass index (BMI) of 20.0 to 24.9 kg/m², and the risk is more than doubled for those who are extremely obese, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverage Consumption Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial increases in the consumption of caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) among young adults have emerged as a public health problem, and the issue requires further investigation with well-controlled experimental trials and survey research, according to research published online Nov. 30 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Evaluation Improves Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Delayed assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients appears to be associated with more joint destruction and a lower probability of a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-free remission, but there is still a delay to assessment of at least 12 weeks in more than two-thirds of patients, according to a study published in the December issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Bloodstream Infections Tied to Excess Mortality in ICU

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Health-care-associated bloodstream infections and pneumonia appear to be strongly associated with increased mortality among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), according to a study published online Dec. 1 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Spironolactone Improves LV Function in Early CKD

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Spironolactone improves markers of regional left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in patients with early chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to research published in the Nov. 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
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PAD Performance Measures Developed

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The Peripheral Artery Disease Performance Measures Writing Committee recently issued performance measures for adults with peripheral artery disease (PAD). The measures have been published online Nov. 29 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Sleeping Problems Associated With Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- People who have trouble sleeping, particularly those with loud snoring, may be at increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, according to research published in the Dec. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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CDC: HIV Testing Among Adults Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The number of adults ever tested for HIV is increasing, though nearly one-third of diagnoses still occur during late stages of disease, according to a report published in the Nov. 30 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Neck Pain Is Often Part of More Widespread Pain

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who report neck pain generally report additional pain in other body sites and reduced functioning associated with this widespread pain, according to research published in the Nov. 1 issue of Spine.

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Variations in U.K. Referral Patterns Examined

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Referral inequalities in the United Kingdom are more apparent for conditions that are not life threatening and when there is an absence of explicit guidelines, and for older patients, according to research published online Nov. 30 in BMJ.

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Integrated Care Cost-Effective for Low Back Pain

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 1 (HealthDay News) -- An integrated care program that incorporates workplace ergonomics appears to be a cost-effective alternative to usual care for individuals sick listed due to chronic low back pain, according to research published online Nov. 30 in BMJ.

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