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Immune-Mediated Diseases May Up Thromboembolism Risk

Last Updated: January 27, 2011.

 

Risk of venous thromboembolism higher in hospitalized patients with these diseases

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People admitted to the hospital with immune-mediated diseases may have a higher risk of getting venous thromboembolism, according to research published online Jan. 10 in BMC Medicine.

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- People admitted to the hospital with immune-mediated diseases may have a higher risk of getting venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to research published online Jan. 10 in BMC Medicine.

Sreeram V. Ramagopalan, D.Phil., of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, and colleagues analyzed databases of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death certificates for the Oxford Record Linkage Study area from 1968 to 1998 (ORLS1) and 1999 to 2008 (ORLS2) and the whole of England (1999 to 2008). The researchers compared immune-mediated disease cohorts with comparison cohorts to determine rate ratios for VTE.

The researchers found that risk of VTE was significantly higher in all three cohorts in people with a hospital admission record for autoimmune hemolytic anemia, chronic active hepatitis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, myxedema, pemphigus/pemphigoid, polyarteritis nodosa, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Some diseases had higher rate ratios than others did; for example, the rate ratios for SLE were 3.61, 4.60, and 3.71 in ORLS1, ORLS2, and the England cohort, respectively.

"Our data suggest that patients with selected immune-mediated disease may need to be considered for thromboprophylaxis," the authors write.

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