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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Ease of Angiography Similar in Right and Left Radial Route

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The success and difficulty of transradial coronary angiography are similar for both right and left radial artery approaches, according to research published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Air Filters May Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of high efficiency particle air (HEPA) filters may help to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease associated with air pollution exposure, according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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C-Reactive Protein Level Does Not Modify Statin Benefit

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration does not alter the benefit of statin therapy for high-risk patients, according to a study published online Jan. 28 in The Lancet.

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Aortic Dissection Rare in Pregnancy With Bicuspid AV

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection is rare in women with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) who are pregnant, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Low Birth Weight Impacts Adult Arterial Proportions

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intima-media thickness (IMT) in young adults born with very low birth weight (VLBW) may be linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy May Reduce Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may decrease the risk of recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Failure Patients in General Wards Have Worse Prognosis

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart failure who are admitted to general hospital wards are at an increased risk of mortality compared to those admitted to cardiology wards, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Heart.

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Immune-Mediated Diseases May Up Thromboembolism Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- People admitted to the hospital with immune-mediated diseases may have a higher risk of getting venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to research published online Jan. 10 in BMC Medicine.

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Smoking Explains Much of Europe's Mortality Gender Gap

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking appears to account for 40 to 60 percent of the gender gap in mortality across Europe, according to research published online Jan. 12 in Tobacco Control.

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Financial Incentive Has No Effect on Hypertension Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Introduction of pay for performance had no effect on the processes of care or on hypertension-related clinical outcomes in the United Kingdom, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in BMJ.

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Ventricular Tachycardia More Common in Public Settings

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia happens more frequently when cardiac arrests are witnessed in a public setting as opposed to at home, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Traffic Noise Tied to Increased Stroke Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to residential road traffic noise is associated with an increased risk of stroke in people older than 64.5 years of age, according to a study published online Jan. 25 in the European Heart Journal.

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Parental History Independently Predicts Myocardial Infarction

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Parental history (PH) of myocardial infarction (MI) is an independent predictor of future MI, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Contrast-Stress Echocardiography Predicts Coronary Syndromes

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise-electrocardiogram testing may not accurately predict the risk of a cardiovascular event in patients with nondiagnostic electrocardiographic findings and normal 12-hour cardiac troponin levels, as compared to contrast-stress echocardiograms, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Stroke Center Admission Likely Improves Patient Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Admission of patients with acute ischemic stroke to a designated stroke center may lower mortality and improve use of thrombolytic therapy, and the occurrence of stroke among patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery appears to be declining despite increases in patient risk profiles, according to two studies published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Tarakji
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Abstract - Xian
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Extra Implanted Defibrillator Shocks Raise Mortality

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Inappropriate shocks by implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are associated with a higher mortality risk, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Projected Heart Disease Care Costs to Triple by 2030

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- If current rates continue, the cost of treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) is likely to increase three-fold within the next two decades, according to a policy statement published online Jan. 24 in Circulation.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Lowers Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Deep brain stimulation (DBS) may offer a new strategy for treating refractory hypertension, according to findings described in a case report published in the Jan. 25 issue of Neurology.

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Lowering BP in Women Reduces Heart Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High systolic blood pressure (BP) appears to be a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular events in women middle-aged and older, and many of these events are potentially preventable with lowered BP, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Hypertension.

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Noncalcified, Mixed Coronary Plaques Predict CAD Outcome

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of noncalcified and mixed coronary plaques in patients with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with worse long-term clinical outcomes, independent of other risk factors, according to a study in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Insufficient Sleep Increases Health Risk in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter sleep duration and more variable sleep patterns are associated with adverse metabolic outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Pharmacist Involvement Improves Disease Management

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- When pharmacists are added to primary care teams, patients with type 2 diabetes achieve better blood pressure control, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Atrial Fibrillation Risk Increased by Alcohol Intake

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a meta-analysis published in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Elevation of Serum Uric Acid Level Associated With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Elevation of serum uric acid (SUA) levels is associated with an increased risk of developing new-onset diabetes in hypertensive patients, according to results from a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Storytelling Intervention Helps Uncontrolled Hypertension

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Storytelling intervention may result in blood pressure reduction in black patients with uncontrolled hypertension, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Apolipoprotein A-I Synthesis Inducer Moderately Successful

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of a novel oral inducer of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) synthesis appears to result in increases of apoA-I levels and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, according to research published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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In Busy Hospitals, Congestive Heart Failure Outcomes Better

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Experience with treating congestive heart failure, as measured by hospital volume, is associated with decreased mortality and fewer readmissions; but the cost per patient is higher, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cardiovascular Risk Clustering in Adolescents Useful

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk clustering -- the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors -- may indicate abnormal vascular function in adolescents and can be a reliable tool for use in clinical practice, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Quitting Antiplatelets Early After Stents Tied to CV Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Early discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy in patients following drug-eluting stent implantation is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, including stent thrombosis and death, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Wireless Remote Monitoring Benefits ICD Recipients

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators with wireless remote monitoring and automatic clinician alerts appear to significantly reduce the time it takes to reach a clinical decision after a clinical event compared with scheduled in-office visits and may also reduce length of hospital stay, according to research published online Jan. 19 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Radiotherapy Increases Risk of Death From Cardiac Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Radiotherapy may increase the long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, especially in women with left-sided breast cancer who are treated with contemporary tangential breast or chest-wall radiotherapy, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Rise in Stroke Patients With Comorbid HIV

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. hospitals are treating significantly more stroke patients who have co-existing HIV infections, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in Neurology.

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Mild Lesions Can Be Predictive of Cardiovascular Events

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Angiographically mild lesions identified in patients who presented with acute coronary syndrome and underwent percutaneous coronary intervention may have characteristics that are predictive of cardiovascular events, according to a study published in the Jan. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Evidence Limited on Statins for Primary Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- There is not enough evidence to support the widespread use of statins in individuals with no history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a review published in The Cochrane Library.

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Fruit and Vegetable Intake Lowers Risk of Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of mortality from ischemic heart disease (IHD), according to a study published online Jan. 18 in the European Heart Journal.

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Depression Linked to Poor Outcomes for Cardiac Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Worsening symptoms of depression are associated with a poor prognosis in patients with heart failure, and routine assessment of these patients may help guide appropriate medical management, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Macrolides Mixed With BP Drugs Can Lead to Hypotension

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Simultaneous use of calcium-channel blockers and some macrolide antibiotics may result in hypotension, which may require hospital admission, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Genetic Predisposition for Coronary Artery Disease ID'd

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Certain genetic profiles appear to increase the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and of myocardial infarction in individuals with CAD, according to an analysis of two genome-wide association studies published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

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FDA: Severe Liver Injury Tied to Dronedarone (Multaq)

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients of the risk of acute liver failure associated with the heart medication dronedarone (Multaq).

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Exenatide Reduces CVD Risk for Patients With Diabetes

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from type 2 diabetes who are treated with exenatide have a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and hospitalization, according to a study published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Low Medication Adherence After Myocardial Infarction

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term adherence to medications following myocardial infarction (MI) in elderly patients is poor, and it is significantly worse among those with kidney dysfunction, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Increased in Liver Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of liver transplant recipients develop post-transplantation metabolic syndrome (PTMS), putting them at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Exercise Helps Patients With Heart Failure Fight Depression

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Structured exercise training (ET) may decrease depressive symptoms, resulting in improved long-term survival, in patients with heart failure, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Metrics Proposed to Monitor Care at Stroke Centers

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association has proposed a set of metrics intended to provide a framework for standard data collection at comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs). These metrics, published online Jan. 13 in Stroke, will help monitor quality of care in these centers and may lead to the development of national performance standards.

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Atrial Fibrillation on the Rise in Hemodialysis Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) diagnosed in American patients who receive hemodialysis is rising and is associated with considerably increased mortality, according to research published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Mediterranean Diet May Help Prevent Diabetes

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Non-calorie-restricted Mediterranean diets (MedDiets) high in unsaturated fat can help prevent diabetes onset in people at high cardiovascular risk, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Combination Therapy Bests Monotherapy for BP Control

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- In individuals with high blood pressure, a combination drug therapy given initially appears to result in better blood pressure control than monotherapy, and patients who undergo the two-drug treatment after taking the single-drug therapy also experience better blood pressure outcomes, though not at the same level as those who began with the combination treatment, according to research published online Jan. 13 in The Lancet.

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Prolonged Sitting Associated With Adverse Health Markers

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged periods of sedentary time without breaks are associated with worse indicators of cardio-metabolic function and inflammation, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the European Heart Journal.

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Mutation Raises HDL, Lowers Efflux From Macrophages

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic mutation can cause increased high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels and reduced cholesterol efflux from macrophages in its carriers, and the capacity for HDL to accept cholesterol from macrophages may be predictive of the risk of coronary artery disease, according to two articles published in the Jan. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Analysis Supports Cardiovascular Concern With NSAIDs

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may increase the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death, according to a meta-analysis published Jan. 11 in BMJ.

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Radial Artery, Saphenous Vein Yield Same Results After CABG

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Using a radial artery graft instead of a saphenous vein graft in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery does not result in greater one-year patency, according to research published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Candesartan Associated With Lower Mortality Than Losartan

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among heart failure patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, those taking candesartan had a lower one-year and five-year mortality risk than those taking losartan, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prolonged Screen Time Linked to Cardiovascular Disease

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged screen-based entertainment is associated with an increase in overall mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, according to a study published in the Jan. 18 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Teen Sugar Intake May Raise Cardiovascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption during adolescence may correlate with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

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Aspirin Use in High-Risk Individuals Is Suboptimal

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Among individuals at increased or high risk for coronary heart disease, fewer blacks, Hispanics, and Chinese adhere to a regular aspirin regimen than do whites, and regular aspirin use overall is relatively low, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Parents' Smoking Is a Risk Factor for Children's High BP

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to other familial and environmental risk factors, parental smoking is an independent risk factor for higher blood pressure in healthy preschool children, according to research published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

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Statins May Be Inadvisable After Hemorrhagic Stroke

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular events may be inadvisable in patients with a high risk of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Renal Function Predicts Heart Failure Outcome

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for heart failure who have resulting worsened renal function (WRF) face increased long-term mortality and rehospitalization risks, especially if renal function does not recover by initial discharge, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Recurrence More Likely for First Troponin-Negative MI Patients

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) whose first troponin test is negative are more likely to undergo less aggressive pharmacotherapy and twice as likely to have a recurrent myocardial infarction (MI) at six months than patients with positive troponin tests, according to research published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Readmissions, Reintervention Slightly Higher With EVAR

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Reinterventions and readmissions are modestly higher after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) compared with open repair, and may diminish long-term survival, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

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New 10-Year Risk Score for Atrial Fibrillation Developed

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A 10-year risk score for new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) in both blacks and whites has been developed; the research has been published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Less Educated STEMI Patients Have Worse Outcomes

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Lower socioeconomic status (SES), as measured by years of education, may be predictive of poorer clinical outcomes in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to research published in the Jan. 11 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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FDA: AngioSculpt PTA Balloon Catheter Platform Recalled

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals of a recall of AngioScore Inc.'s AngioSculpt Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty (PTA) Scoring Balloon Catheter OTW 0.018" Platform, as a design defect may result in retained device fragments or significant arterial injury that could result in death or the need for additional surgical intervention.

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Invasive Strategy Can Reduce Mortality in Elderly With MI

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Applying the invasive strategy of coronary angiography to older patients with acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) complicated by cardiogenic shock reduces in-hospital and six-month mortality rates, according to research published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Heart Failure Patients Benefit From n-3 PUFA Treatment

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic heart failure due to nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy have improved left ventricular (LV) functionality after treatment with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) according to results from a study published online Jan. 5 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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FDA: Equivalence Reviews Required for Tobacco Products

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today that certain tobacco products, including cigarettes, roll-your-own tobacco, and all smokeless products, introduced or changed in the United States after Feb. 15, 2007, must be reviewed by the agency. In its newly published guidance, the agency says that any company marketing a tobacco product must prove that the product is "substantially equivalent" to products commercially available on Feb. 15, 2007.

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Bevacizumab Tied to Congestive Heart Failure Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bevacizumab appears to be associated with a significantly increased risk of congestive heart failure (CHF) among patients with breast cancer, according to research published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Depression/Diabetes Combo May Raise Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The combined presence of depression and diabetes mellitus among older women appears to be associated with a particularly increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Lifestyle Affects Lipid Levels in Transition to Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors such as weight gain, smoking, and loss of fitness influence the development of risk levels for blood lipid and lipoprotein as people transition from youth to adulthood, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Minorities May Be Operated on by Lower-Performing Surgeons

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Minority patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are more likely to be operated on by cardiac surgeons with higher risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs), according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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ICD Use Common in Patients Lacking Implantation Criteria

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- More than a fifth of patients who receive an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) do not meet evidence-based criteria for the intervention, according to research published in the Jan. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cerebral Oxygen Predicts Risks in Cardiac Surgery Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Low preoperative cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2) may be predictive of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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