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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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January 2011 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery Safe in Pregnancy

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Overnight closed-loop insulin delivery appears to be safe among pregnant women, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Nocturia Is a Predictive Factor of Mortality

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturia is a strong predictive factor of mortality in men and women younger than 65, with a dose-response pattern of increased mortality risk with increasing number of nightly voiding episodes, according to a study in the February issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Childhood Trauma Indirectly Tied to Obesity in Women

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience childhood trauma and go on to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) as adults, may be more likely to have weight problems, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Traumatic Stress.

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Menopausal Symptoms Linked to Lower Risk of Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience menopausal symptoms and have increased intensity of hot flushes have a reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Aortic Dissection Rare in Pregnancy With Bicuspid AV

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection is rare in women with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) who are pregnant, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Gynecologic Oncologists Improve Patient Survival Rates

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with high-risk endometrial cancer, who are under the care of gynecologic oncologists, have improved survival rates, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Abortion May Not Increase Psychiatric Problems

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women do not appear more likely to seek out psychiatric help after a first-trimester abortion than before one, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Breast Implants May Be Associated With Rare Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Saline or silicone gel-filled breast implants may be associated with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today. The agency requested that health care professionals report any confirmed cases of the disease in women with implants.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Antioxidant Supplementation May Improve Male Fertility

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Antioxidant supplementation in subfertile men may increase the likelihood of pregnancy and live births for couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques, according to a review published online Jan. 19 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Recombinant Human Prolactin Increases Milk Volume

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with recombinant human prolactin (r-hPRL) increases milk volume, induces changes in milk composition similar to those that take place in regular lactogenesis, and increases antimicrobially active oligosaccharide concentrations for women who have both prolactin deficiency and lactation insufficiency, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Physicians Lacking Intrauterine Contraception Knowledge

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Family physicians have training and knowledge gaps that result in missed opportunities to offer intrauterine contraception (IUC) as a form of birth control to eligible patients, according to a study published online Dec. 3 in Contraception.

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False-Positive Mammogram Results Affect Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive false-positive results from routine breast cancer screenings may experience a low quality of life and feelings of anxiety for at least one year, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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Smoking Tied to Modest Increase in Breast Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Active smoking has a modest effect on the risk of developing breast cancer, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lowering BP in Women Reduces Heart Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- High systolic blood pressure (BP) appears to be a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular events in women middle-aged and older, and many of these events are potentially preventable with lowered BP, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Hypertension.

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Long-Term Decline in Abortion Incidence Stalls

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term decline in abortion incidence appears to have leveled off, and antiabortion harassment among providers is high in some regions, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health.

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Anti-Estrogens May Slow Lung Cancer Progression

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women with breast cancer who are treated with anti-estrogens have a lower lung cancer mortality rate than the general population, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Cancer.

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Breast Calcification May ID Worsening Kidney Disease

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Breast arterial calcification may have a role as a specific marker of medial vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is significantly increased in end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), according to a study published online Jan. 21 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Maternal Grief May Predict Infant Attachment Security

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Resolution of maternal grief following the experience of preterm birth, and the subsequent quality of maternal interactions, have important implications for attachment security development in premature infants, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Radiotherapy Increases Risk of Death From Cardiac Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Radiotherapy may increase the long-term risk of death from cardiovascular disease, especially in women with left-sided breast cancer who are treated with contemporary tangential breast or chest-wall radiotherapy, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Genetics May Contribute to Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Rare variants in genes associated with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism are found in some women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, according to research published in the Jan. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Detecting Occult Lymph Node Metastases Has Little Benefit

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Occult metastases are prognostic variables in patients with breast cancer who have negative sentinel lymph node biopsies, but the difference in five-year outcome is very small, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Basal-Like Breast CA Equally Aggressive for Different Races

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Basal-like breast cancer is not more aggressive among African-American individuals than whites; however, in patients with luminal A cancer, African-American women experience worse outcomes, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

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Escitalopram Successfully Reduces Hot Flashes

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Menopausal women treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram have fewer, and less severe, hot flashes than women taking a placebo, according to a study published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Severe Maternal Psoriasis Linked to Low Birth Weight

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women with severe psoriasis are 1.4 times more likely to have a low birth weight (LBW) infant, but mild psoriasis is not related to an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Western Diet Linked to Aggressive Breast Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A Western diet high in fat and cholesterol may be linked to larger, faster-growing tumors that metastasize more easily in mice predisposed to breast cancer, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Pathology.

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Adjuvant Breast Cancer Therapies Offer Similar Survival

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adjuvant breast cancer therapy with an aromatase inhibitor (exemestane) alone, or used following tamoxifen, offers similar disease-free survival rates but different side-effect profiles, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in The Lancet.

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Updated Osteoporosis Screening Recommendations Issued

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has issued an updated statement recommending that women aged 65 years or older, and younger women with an increased risk of fractures, should be screened for osteoporosis; the statement has been published online Jan. 17 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Chemical Exposure Tied to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women with occupational exposure to phthalates or pesticides appear to have a higher risk of adverse fertility and pregnancy outcomes, including prolonged time to pregnancy (TTP) and lower birth weight, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Female Urinary Problems Improve After Gastric Banding

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who lose weight after laparoscopic gastric band (LGB) surgery have significant improvements in symptoms of urinary incontinence (UI), particularly stress incontinence, but urge incontinence worsens, according to research published in the January issue of BJU International.

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Breast-Feeding Recommendations Challenged

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In light of new evidence, the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation to exclusively breast-feed for six months has been called into question, according to an analysis published online Jan. 13 in BMJ.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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MRI During Chemotherapy IDs Subtypes of Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to monitor response during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), and it is effective in triple-negative or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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High Cost of Hospitalization for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory treatment, either in emergency rooms or outpatient clinics, was more cost-effective than hospitalizing teen girls with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

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Cost of Cancer Care May Increase 39 Percent by 2020

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates and projections of the medical cost of cancer care in the United States through 2020 indicate that this cost may increase by at least 27 percent and potentially up to 39 percent, according to research published online Jan. 12 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Multiplexed Maternal Plasma Sequencing Detects Trisomy 21

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Multiplexed maternal plasma DNA sequencing analysis could be used in high-risk pregnancies to rule out fetal trisomy 21, rendering invasive diagnostic procedures unnecessary if referrals are based on sequencing results, according to a study published Jan. 11 in BMJ.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Quality-of-Life Reporting Methodology May Fall Short

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Quality-of-life (QOL) measurements are frequently taken into account in trials for breast cancer, but an updated review and analysis of the literature suggests the reporting methodology has room for improvement; the research has been published online Jan. 7 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Absence of Macrosomia May Be Predicted by Two Sonograms

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The absence of fetal overgrowth in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) was found to be reliably predicted by two serial sonographic abdominal circumference measurements, according to research published in the January issue of Diabetes Care.

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Closely Spaced Pregnancies May Raise Odds of Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Second-born children born after an interpregnancy interval (IPI) of less than one year appear to be at a substantially higher risk of autism than those with IPIs of at least 36 months, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Male Circumcision Reduces HPV Transmission

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-negative individuals, male circumcision appears to reduce the transmission of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to female partners, according to research published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet.

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Behavioral Interventions in Youths Lower STI Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive behavioral interventions in adolescents can decrease risky sexual behavior and prevent incident sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to research published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Iniparib Increases Survival in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of iniparib, a poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, to chemotherapy appears to increase survival and improve clinical benefit in patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, according to research published online Jan. 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bevacizumab Tied to Congestive Heart Failure Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bevacizumab appears to be associated with a significantly increased risk of congestive heart failure (CHF) among patients with breast cancer, according to research published online Jan. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Estrogen May Promote Spread of Head and Neck Cancer

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen appears to induce the expression of genes that ultimately promote the development of head and neck cancers, according to research published in the January issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

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