Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

January 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Long Febrile Seizures Linked to Developmental Delays

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A prolonged first febrile seizure is likely to occur at a younger age and is associated with developmental delay, according to a study published online Jan. 11 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Birth Weight Impacts Adult Arterial Proportions

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intima-media thickness (IMT) in young adults born with very low birth weight (VLBW) may be linked to an increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diet May Be to Blame for Rise in Asthma Prevalence

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of asthma is increasing rapidly, and diet has emerged in the last 15 years as a possible culprit. Researchers explore the relationship between diet and asthma in two articles published in the February issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract - Allan/Devereux
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Arvaniti
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Targeting Parents Leads to Sustained Child Weight Loss

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Approaches that specifically target parents can result in significant weight loss in moderately obese prepubertal children, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Recombinant Human Prolactin Increases Milk Volume

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with recombinant human prolactin (r-hPRL) increases milk volume, induces changes in milk composition similar to those that take place in regular lactogenesis, and increases antimicrobially active oligosaccharide concentrations for women who have both prolactin deficiency and lactation insufficiency, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Allegra Approved for Over-the-Counter Sale

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sanofi-Aventis' prescription non-drowsy antihistamine, Allegra (fexofenadine), has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for over-the-counter sale, the company said Tuesday.

National Library of Medicine

Rotavirus Vaccination Prevents Hospital-Acquired Infection

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of community-based rotavirus vaccination is linked to a reduction in the number of children who are hospitalized with community-acquired rotavirus infection, and may prevent hospitalized children from getting infected with rotavirus, according to research published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Substantial Source of Dosing Error Found for Pediatric Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Current equipment does not permit accurate volume measurements of less than 0.1 mL; consequently there is a substantial risk of dosing error in intravenous medication doses that require small volumes to be administered to pediatric patients, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Biologics Effective, but Pricy, to Treat Juvenile Arthritis

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Biologics are more effective than methotrexate (MTX) in achieving a short-term response in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who have had previous suboptimal response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, according to research published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Insufficient Sleep Increases Health Risk in Children

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Shorter sleep duration and more variable sleep patterns are associated with adverse metabolic outcomes, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Amputation Level Affects Energy Expenditure in Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children with a below-knee amputation are able to maintain normal walking speed without significantly increasing their energy cost, whereas those with above-knee amputations walk slower and expend more energy, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sleep Study May Predict Post-Op Issues in Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The use of polysomnography (PSG) prior to adenotonsillectomy may be useful in predicting which patients are at increased risk for postoperative respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy, according to a study published in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiovascular Risk Clustering in Adolescents Useful

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk clustering -- the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors -- may indicate abnormal vascular function in adolescents and can be a reliable tool for use in clinical practice, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Reported Influenza-Like Illness Widespread in 2009-10

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A relatively large proportion of the U.S. population reported experiencing symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) during the 2009 to 2010 influenza season, and many of them reported seeking health care for those symptoms, according to data published in the Jan. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Maternal Grief May Predict Infant Attachment Security

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Resolution of maternal grief following the experience of preterm birth, and the subsequent quality of maternal interactions, have important implications for attachment security development in premature infants, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bisphosphonates May Improve Survival in Duchenne MD

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- When combined with steroid treatment, bisphosphonate use may improve survival rates in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Malaria Vaccine Offers Children Long-Lasting Protection

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The lead candidate malaria vaccine, RTS,S/AS01E, offers long-lasting protection against clinical malaria in healthy African children, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Natroba Approved for Head Lice

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Natroba (spinosad) Topical Suspension 0.9 percent has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat head lice in people aged 4 years and older.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

HIV Transmission During Breast-Feeding Can Be Reduced

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Triple antiretroviral prophylaxis given during late pregnancy and breast-feeding reduces the risk of HIV transmission to infants, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Severe Maternal Psoriasis Linked to Low Birth Weight

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women with severe psoriasis are 1.4 times more likely to have a low birth weight (LBW) infant, but mild psoriasis is not related to an increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
Full Text

Breast-Feeding Linked to Increased Strength in Teens

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding duration may play a role in determining adolescent lower-body explosive strength, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Repeated Acetaminophen Can Cause Infant Liver Failure

TUESDAY, Jan. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Acetaminophen is generally considered child-safe, but repeated doses in infants can result in acute liver failure, according to a case report published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Community Intervention May Improve Newborn Survival

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Community-based interventions led by trained "lady health workers" (LHWs) have the potential to reduce the neonatal mortality rate in Pakistan, according to research published online Jan. 15 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

More Cigarette Ad Exposure Leads to More Teen Smoking

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to cigarette advertisements, but not other advertisements, is associated with initiation of adolescent smoking, according a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pathological Gaming Tied to Depression, Anxiety in Kids

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pathological gaming is not simply a symptom of comorbid disorders, and can last for years, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Practice Guidelines for Pediatric Tonsillectomy Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based guidelines surrounding the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy have been published in a supplement to the January issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text

Breast-Feeding Recommendations Challenged

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In light of new evidence, the 2001 World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation to exclusively breast-feed for six months has been called into question, according to an analysis published online Jan. 13 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Income Black Moms Often Provide Solid Foods Early

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Early complementary feeding (CF) appears to be highly prevalent among low-income, black, first-time mothers, with maternal perception of infant temperament, breast-feeding, and maternal obesity as well as depression significantly associated with early CF, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

More Information

Organ Donors From Mortalities in Neonatal ICUs Identified

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The identification of theoretically eligible infant donors in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is described in a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Optimism May Protect Teens From Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Optimistic thinking may provide protection against some adolescent health risks, including depressive symptoms and substance use, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text

High Cost of Hospitalization for Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory treatment, either in emergency rooms or outpatient clinics, was more cost-effective than hospitalizing teen girls with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), according to a study published online Nov. 5 in Sexually Transmitted Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Antibiotics Benefit Acute Ear Infections in Young Children

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children with acute otitis media appear to benefit from antimicrobial treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanate, according to two articles published in the Jan. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Tahtinen
Full Text
Abstract - Hoberman
Full Text

CDC: 8 Percent of Individuals in U.S. Have Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- More than 8 percent of people in the United States have asthma, and the condition is associated with substantial loss of work and school days as well as increases in emergency department visits and hospitalizations, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Reports.

More Information

Bottle Rockets Tied to Significant Ocular Injuries

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Bottle rockets are associated with significant ocular injuries among children and adolescents, including permanent loss of vision, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Mom's Depression Lowers Epileptic Child's Quality of Life

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms in mothers negatively impact health-related quality of life (HRQL) of their children with new-onset epilepsy during the first 24 months from diagnosis, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Teen Sugar Intake May Raise Cardiovascular Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Added sugar consumption during adolescence may correlate with several risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Corticosteroid Use May Shorten Children's Hospital Stays

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of adjunct corticosteroids in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with shortened lengths of stay (LOS) in the hospital, especially those patients who receive concomitant β-agonist therapy, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parents' Smoking Is a Risk Factor for Children's High BP

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to other familial and environmental risk factors, parental smoking is an independent risk factor for higher blood pressure in healthy preschool children, according to research published online Jan. 10 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

Full Text - Hyman
Full Text - de Oliveira
Editorial

For Teen Athletes, Concussion Symptoms Differ by Gender

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- High school-age boys and girls tend to present with different symptoms after a concussion, but their recovery time is the same, according to research published in the January/February issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

Abstract
Full Text

Closely Spaced Pregnancies May Raise Odds of Autism

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Second-born children born after an interpregnancy interval (IPI) of less than one year appear to be at a substantially higher risk of autism than those with IPIs of at least 36 months, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Fish-Oil Lipid Emulsion Lowers Retinopathy Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Administration of a fish-oil-based lipid emulsion in very-low-birth-weight infants may be useful for prophylaxis of severe retinopathy, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Scoliosis Screening Costs in Hong Kong, Rochester Similar

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The costs of an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis school screening program in Hong Kong are comparable with the costs of student screening in Rochester, Minn., the only other location that has undergone a comparable screening program evaluation, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Parenting Programs Improve Childhood Development

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric primary care interventions may offer an important opportunity for reducing media exposure in young children and increasing parent-child interactions in low-socioeconomic-status families, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract 1
Full Text
Abstract 2
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Back Pain Tied to Psychological Well-Being in Teens

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Systematic physical activity and control of psychological profile should decrease low back pain (LBP) frequency and intensity in adolescents, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Behavioral Interventions in Youths Lower STI Risk

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive behavioral interventions in adolescents can decrease risky sexual behavior and prevent incident sexually transmitted infections (STIs), according to research published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Imaging With Ionizing Radiation Common in Children

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of diagnostic imaging procedures with ionizing radiation appears to be common among children, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lifestyle Affects Lipid Levels in Transition to Adulthood

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle factors such as weight gain, smoking, and loss of fitness influence the development of risk levels for blood lipid and lipoprotein as people transition from youth to adulthood, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Self-Reported Seat Belt Use in U.S. Has Risen

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Seat belt use has increased nationally, particularly in states with primary enforcement laws, and nonfatal motor vehicle-occupant injuries treated in emergency departments have declined, though they still affect a substantial number of people, according to a report in the Jan. 4 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

FDA: Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution Recalled

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and The Ritedose Corporation have notified health care professionals and consumers of a voluntary recall of 0.083 percent Albuterol Sulfate Inhalation Solution, 3 mL in 25, 30, and 60 unit dose vials, as the 2.5 mg/3 mL single use vials are embossed with the incorrect concentration of 0.5 mg/3 mL. This may pose a health risk to patients, which could result in temporary and medically reversible events or even life-threatening events and death.

More Information

Many Babies, Toddlers Obese or at Risk of Being So

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, a substantial proportion of children between the ages of 9 months and 2 years are obese or at risk of being so, according to research published in the January/February issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitalizations Fall After Varicella Vaccination Program

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The number and rate of varicella-related hospitalizations declined significantly after implementation of a one-dose varicella vaccination program in 1995, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Clostridium Difficile Infection Up in Hospitalized Children

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) appears to be increasing among hospitalized children, with especially high risk among children with inflammatory bowel disease or other conditions requiring antibiotics or immunosuppression, according to a study published online Jan. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: January 2011 Briefing - Orthopedics Next: January 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.