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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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January 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Improvement of Behavioral Effects of Fragile X Syndrome

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Evaluation of a selective metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) inhibitor in treating fragile X Syndrome (FXS) indicates improvement in patients with a fully methylated fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene, according to a study published in the Jan. 5 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Childhood Trauma Indirectly Tied to Obesity in Women

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Women who experience childhood trauma and go on to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) as adults, may be more likely to have weight problems, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Traumatic Stress.

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Adult ADHD Linked to Lewy Body Dementia

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with symptoms of attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at increased risk of developing dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), according to a study published in the January issue of the European Journal of Neurology.

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Deep Brain Stimulation Stalls Parkinson's Progression

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who are effectively treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS), the natural progression of the disease's motor symptoms appears to stabilize over time, according to a study published in the November issue of the International Journal of Neuroscience.

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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy May Reduce Heart Disease

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may decrease the risk of recurrent acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Brain Response to Rectal Distension Different in IBS

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) experience greater brain activation in regions associated with emotional arousal and endogenous pain modulation when subjected to rectal distension, compared to controls, according to a meta-analysis published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Abortion May Not Increase Psychiatric Problems

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Women do not appear more likely to seek out psychiatric help after a first-trimester abortion than before one, according to research published in the Jan. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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False-Positive Mammogram Results Affect Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive false-positive results from routine breast cancer screenings may experience a low quality of life and feelings of anxiety for at least one year, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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Viibryd Approved for Major Depressive Disorder

MONDAY, Jan. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Viibryd (vilazodone hydrochloride) tablets have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults.

National Institute of Mental Health

Suicide Risk, Accidental Death Increased in Fibromyalgia

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from fibromyalgia do not appear to be at increased risk for mortality, but the risk of death as a result of suicide and accidents is increased, according to a study in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Depression in Cancer Patients Less Common Than Thought

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Depression and anxiety may be less common in cancer patients than previously thought, but mood disorders still occur in a substantial number of patients in various hospital settings, according to research published online Jan. 19 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Predeployment Screen Linked to Fewer Mental Health Issues

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Predeployment mental health screening in soldiers is associated with reductions in occupationally impairing mental health problems, fewer medical evacuations due to mental health reasons, and less suicidal ideation while deployed, according to a study published online Jan. 18 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Maternal Grief May Predict Infant Attachment Security

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Resolution of maternal grief following the experience of preterm birth, and the subsequent quality of maternal interactions, have important implications for attachment security development in premature infants, according to a study published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Depression Linked to Poor Outcomes for Cardiac Patients

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Worsening symptoms of depression are associated with a poor prognosis in patients with heart failure, and routine assessment of these patients may help guide appropriate medical management, according to a study in the Jan. 25 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Surgeons Suffer From Suicidal Ideation, Burnout

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A cross-sectional survey of surgeons identified increased rates of suicidal ideation (SI), burnout, and depression, and suggests that surgeons are reluctant to seek professional help, according to a study published in the January issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Pathological Gaming Tied to Depression, Anxiety in Kids

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Pathological gaming is not simply a symptom of comorbid disorders, and can last for years, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Exercise Helps Patients With Heart Failure Fight Depression

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Structured exercise training (ET) may decrease depressive symptoms, resulting in improved long-term survival, in patients with heart failure, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Spine Specialists May Not Recognize Patients' Distress

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Spinal surgeons relying on their clinical impression often do not accurately identify patients in psychological distress, according to a study published in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Commentary (subscription or payment may be required)

Optimism May Protect Teens From Depression

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Optimistic thinking may provide protection against some adolescent health risks, including depressive symptoms and substance use, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Advance Directives Less Likely for Mentally Ill Residents

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Among residents of U.S. nursing homes, those with serious mental illness are less likely to have written medical advance directives, according to research published in the January issue of Psychiatric Services.

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Mom's Depression Lowers Epileptic Child's Quality of Life

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Depressive symptoms in mothers negatively impact health-related quality of life (HRQL) of their children with new-onset epilepsy during the first 24 months from diagnosis, according to research published online Nov. 3 in Epilepsia.

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Cancer Patients' Sleep Issues Linked to Smoking, Anxiety

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients should be assessed for sleep disturbances, anxiety, smoking, and alcohol consumption, according to a study published in the January issue of Journal of Addictions Nursing.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

Full Text - Hyman
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Bright Light Treatment Improves Nonseasonal Depressive Disorder

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Bright light treatment (BLT) may improve mood, sleep efficiency, and melatonin level in older adults with major depressive disorder (MDD), but adding a cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, to antidepressant treatment may have no benefit in preventing cognitive impairment, according to two studies published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Lieverse
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Abstract - Reynolds
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Back Pain Tied to Psychological Well-Being in Teens

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Systematic physical activity and control of psychological profile should decrease low back pain (LBP) frequency and intensity in adolescents, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Medications Thwart Smokers' Cravings

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Varenicline and bupropion appear to influence brain pathways associated with cue-induced cravings in smokers, according to two articles published online Jan. 6 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Franklin
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Abstract - Culbertson
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Depression/Diabetes Combo May Raise Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The combined presence of depression and diabetes mellitus among older women appears to be associated with a particularly increased risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Familial Alcoholism Risk May Be Linked to Obesity

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Familial alcoholism risk appears to be associated with obesity, especially among women, according to research published in the December issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Concussion May Have Little Long-Term Effect on Soldiers

TUESDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appears to be strongly related to psychosocial outcomes and postconcussive symptoms in soldiers a year after they return from Iraq, concussion/mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) seems to have little impact on these outcomes after PTSD is accounted for, according to research published in the January issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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