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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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January 2011 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: February 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for January 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Radiofrequency Ablation, Surgery Equal in Small HCC

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Overall survival is comparable for patients with small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with surgical resection (SR) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA), according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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New Device May Help Surgeons Resect Brain Tumors

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed optical touch pointer (OTP) used to differentiate between healthy tissue and tumor tissue by means of fiber-optic fluorescence spectroscopy can help surgeons during resection of malignant brain tumors, according to a study published in the January issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Further Surgery for Adjacent Segment Disease Varies

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The annual incidence and predicted 10-year prevalence of further surgery for adjacent segment disease (ASD) after lumbar arthrodesis are 2.5 and 22.2 percent, respectively, though rates vary substantially based on identified risk factors, according to a study published in the January issue of The Spine Journal.

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Face Transplant Costs Similar to Multiple Reconstructions

MONDAY, Jan. 31 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of facial transplant is similar to multiple conventional reconstructions, according to a case report of the first U.S. face transplant published in the February issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Aortic Dissection Rare in Pregnancy With Bicuspid AV

FRIDAY, Jan. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Aortic dissection is rare in women with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) who are pregnant, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Live Donor Kidney Transport Likely Safe

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Live donor kidneys that are transported for transplant function just as well as do kidneys removed and transplanted on site, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases Ups Survival

THURSDAY, Jan. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Two-stage resection (TSR) is associated with good outcomes for patients with advanced colorectal liver metastases (CLM) compared to those treated nonsurgically, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Treatments for Spine Infection After Surgery Assessed

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Anterior spine infection may occur following posterior pedicle screw instrumentation but can be successfully treated with combined posterior surgery and anterior debridement with fusion, according to a study published in the January issue of The Spine Journal.

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Electronic Health Records May Not Improve Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic health records (EHRs) and clinical decision support (CDS) do not appear to improve the quality of clinical care, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Stroke Center Admission Likely Improves Patient Outcomes

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Admission of patients with acute ischemic stroke to a designated stroke center may lower mortality and improve use of thrombolytic therapy, and the occurrence of stroke among patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery appears to be declining despite increases in patient risk profiles, according to two studies published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Tarakji
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Abstract - Xian
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False-Positive Mammogram Results Affect Quality of Life

TUESDAY, Jan. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Women who receive false-positive results from routine breast cancer screenings may experience a low quality of life and feelings of anxiety for at least one year, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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Sleep Study May Predict Post-Op Issues in Children

FRIDAY, Jan. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The use of polysomnography (PSG) prior to adenotonsillectomy may be useful in predicting which patients are at increased risk for postoperative respiratory complications following adenotonsillectomy, according to a study published in the January issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Vulnerable Populations Have Poor Access to Trauma Care

THURSDAY, Jan. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Difficult access to trauma care is not uncommon among specific segments of the U.S. population, and warfarin use in trauma patients has increased and is associated with a higher mortality risk, according to two articles published in the January issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract - Hsia/Shen
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Abstract - Dossett
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Surgeons Suffer From Suicidal Ideation, Burnout

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 19 (HealthDay News) -- A cross-sectional survey of surgeons identified increased rates of suicidal ideation (SI), burnout, and depression, and suggests that surgeons are reluctant to seek professional help, according to a study published in the January issue of Archives of Surgery.

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Measures Predicting Vision Post Cataract Surgery Validated

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in visual acuity and function after cataract surgery may be predicted using visual acuity (VA) and the visual function index-14 (VF-14) test, according to a study published in the January issue of Ophthalmology.

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Predictors of Discharge Status After Cystectomy Identified

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Predictors of discharge status after radical cystectomy (RC) include sociodemographic factors, preoperative performance status, comorbidities, and perioperative factors, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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New Practice Guidelines for Pediatric Tonsillectomy Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based guidelines surrounding the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy have been published in a supplement to the January issue of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery.

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Female Urinary Problems Improve After Gastric Banding

MONDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Women who lose weight after laparoscopic gastric band (LGB) surgery have significant improvements in symptoms of urinary incontinence (UI), particularly stress incontinence, but urge incontinence worsens, according to research published in the January issue of BJU International.

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Multimodal Analgesia Important in Spine Surgery

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A multimodal analgesic therapy is important during preoperative visits of minimally invasive spine surgery patients, according to a review of methods published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

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Metabolic Syndrome Increased in Liver Transplant Recipients

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of liver transplant recipients develop post-transplantation metabolic syndrome (PTMS), putting them at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Poor Pre-Op Nutrition Tied to Mortality Risk After Cystectomy

FRIDAY, Jan. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Nutritional deficiency, as measured by preoperative weight loss, serum albumin, and body mass index (BMI), is a strong predictor of poor overall survival and 90-day mortality in patients undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) for urothelial carcinoma, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.

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CDC Report Highlights Important Health Disparities

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Among Americans, disparities in income, race and ethnicity, gender, and other social attributes have an impact on whether an individual is healthy or ill or will die prematurely, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, released as a supplement to the Jan. 14 issue of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Organ Donors From Mortalities in Neonatal ICUs Identified

THURSDAY, Jan. 13 (HealthDay News) -- The identification of theoretically eligible infant donors in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is described in a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Behavioral Therapy Reduces Incontinence After Surgery

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral therapy may help to significantly reduce persistent postprostatectomy incontinence, according to a study published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Radial Artery, Saphenous Vein Yield Same Results After CABG

TUESDAY, Jan. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Using a radial artery graft instead of a saphenous vein graft in patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery does not result in greater one-year patency, according to research published in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Burnout Levels Particularly High in Residents

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of burnout and risk for burnout are high in physicians, particularly residents, and more than a quarter of anesthesiology chairs meet criteria for high burnout, according to two articles published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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Prehospital Intravenous Fluids May Harm Trauma Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Trauma patients receiving prehospital intravenous fluid have a higher mortality rate than those who do not, according to a study published online Dec. 20 in the Annals of Surgery.

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Readmissions, Reintervention Slightly Higher With EVAR

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Reinterventions and readmissions are modestly higher after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair (EVAR) compared with open repair, and may diminish long-term survival, according to research published in the January issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

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Male Circumcision Reduces HPV Transmission

FRIDAY, Jan. 7 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-negative individuals, male circumcision appears to reduce the transmission of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to female partners, according to research published online Jan. 7 in The Lancet.

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Medical, Surgical Treatment of Pancreatic Necrosis Compared

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Conservative primary treatment of infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN) with antibiotics and percutaneous drainage has a higher 10-year survival rate than does surgical necrosectomy, according to a study published in the December issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Two Surgeries Have Similar Fusion, Complication Rates

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The open and minimally-invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (open TLIF and mTLIF) procedures have similar and relatively high fusion rates, and their complication rates are similar as well, according to a meta-analysis published in the Dec. 15 issue of Spine.

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Invasive Strategy Can Reduce Mortality in Elderly With MI

THURSDAY, Jan. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Applying the invasive strategy of coronary angiography to older patients with acute myocardial infarctions (AMIs) complicated by cardiogenic shock reduces in-hospital and six-month mortality rates, according to research published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Researchers Define Spine Surgery Complications

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have developed a practical definition of complications in spine surgery but have determined that further work in assessing complications is necessary; their research has been published in the December issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Minorities May Be Operated on by Lower-Performing Surgeons

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Minority patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) are more likely to be operated on by cardiac surgeons with higher risk-adjusted mortality rates (RAMRs), according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Cerebral Oxygen Predicts Risks in Cardiac Surgery Patients

MONDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Low preoperative cerebral oxygen saturation (ScO2) may be predictive of adverse outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, according to research published in the January issue of Anesthesiology.

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