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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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June 2008 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: July 01, 2008.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for June 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Gastric Bypass May Raise Risk of Kidney Stones

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Morbidly obese patients who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are at risk of developing kidney stones as early as three months after surgery, researchers report in the June issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Waist Size Determines Cardiovascular Disease Risk

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Waist circumference is effective in determining the risk of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, and is as effective as body mass index (BMI) in identifying individuals with cardiovascular risk factors, according to the results of a study published in the July 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: Diabetes Prevalence on the Rise in the United States

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of diabetes in the United States rose more than 3 million in roughly two years, according to data released June 24 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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Sexually Transmitted Infections Rising Among Older Adults

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1996 and 2003, the rate of sexually transmitted infections other than HIV more than doubled among people older than age 45 in the United Kingdom, according to a report published online June 27 in Sexually Transmitted Infections.

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Physical Activity Improves Children's Metabolic Health

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- In pre-pubertal schoolchildren in the United Kingdom, sustained physical activity above the government-recommended intensity of three metabolic equivalents of thermogenesis for 60 minutes per day is associated with improved metabolic health without affecting body mass index (BMI). But fewer than half of boys and only one in eight girls meet this guideline, according to the results of a study published online June 30 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Medicaid Mental Services Increase with More Funding

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Increased funding of Medicaid mental health services and expansion of Medicaid's Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) program in California resulted in increased delivery of mental health services, especially in rural areas and communities historically receiving low levels of funding, according to study findings published in the June issue of Medical Care.

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Drug Therapy Found Effective in Crohn's Disease

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents are effective in treating both luminal and fistulizing Crohn's disease but further safety studies need to be done, according to an article published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Declining Hospitalizations for Bleeding Esophageal Varices

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- While the incidence of esophageal bleeding may be declining due to primary and secondary prophylaxis, the pervasiveness of portal hypertension is leading to an increased incidence of non-bleeding esophageal varices, according to an article published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Gastroenterology Malpractice Claims Analyzed

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- While the procedural nature of gastroenterology leads to a perception of increased legal risk, there are relatively few malpractice claims and payments, according to an article published in the June issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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CDC: 2007-2008 Rotavirus Season Unusually Mild

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- The 2007-2008 rotavirus season began three months later than usual and has been significantly milder, suggesting that 2006 recommendations for infants to be vaccinated at ages 2 months, 4 months and 6 months with the RotaTeq vaccine may be having an impact, according to an interim report issued June 25 in the early release edition of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Exercise-Related Cardiac Arrest Survival Poor in Youth

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Incidents of exercise-related sudden cardiac arrest in youths in the United States have generally resulted in poor survival during the past seven years, although a trend toward improved survival has developed recently, researchers report in the June issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Sudden Hearing Loss Linked to Increased Stroke Risk

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- After an acute episode of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), individuals have an increased risk of stroke, according to research published online June 26 in the journal Stroke.

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Higher Albuminuria Levels Associated with Hypertension

MONDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Having a higher albumin/creatinine ratio -- even if it's in the range considered "normal" -- is associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension in women without diabetes, according to a report published online June 25 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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One in Eight Taiwanese Has Chronic Kidney Disease

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- About 12 percent of the Taiwanese population has chronic kidney disease, which nearly doubles their risk of death, though most are unaware that they have the disorder, researchers report in the June 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Program Improves Outcomes in Pregnant Substance Abusers

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Perinatal outcomes are significantly better when women with substance abuse problems receive treatment integrated with prenatal visits, according to research published online June 26 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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U.K. Doctors Must Change View of National Health Service

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- As the U.K.'s National Health Service reaches its 60th anniversary, its doctors should revise their vision of the organization from one primarily based on the employee/employer relationship to grapple with the true scale of the challenges that the NHS faces, according to an opinion piece published in the June 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Clean Water for All Can Cut Global Disease Burden

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Safe supplies of drinking water, along with improved sanitation and hygiene, could reduce the global burden in disease by 9.1 percent and reduce it by 15 percent in the 32 worst-affected countries, according to an editorial published in the June 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Most Heterosexual HIV Spread in Africa Within Couples

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of heterosexually acquired HIV transmission in urban Zambia and Rwanda occurs within married or cohabitating couples, suggesting that voluntary counseling or testing for couples is needed, according to a report in the June 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Merits of International Medical Conferences Debated

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Are international medical conferences an outdated luxury the planet can't afford? That's the subject of a "Head to Head" debate published in the June 28 issue of BMJ.

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Buprenorphine Maintenance Best for Heroin Addicts

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Maintenance treatment of detoxified heroin addicts with buprenorphine is more effective in sustaining abstinence and delaying resumption of heroin use compared with naltrexone or placebo, researchers report in the June 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Guanylyl Cyclase C May Offer Therapeutic Cancer Target

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), which is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and colorectal tumors, may represent a therapeutic target for metastatic colon cancer, according to the results of a study in mice published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Screening Vital for Relatives of Long-QT Patients

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- It is becoming increasingly common for children to be identified with congenital long-QT syndrome because of family screening, and with appropriate therapy, survival is excellent among both probands and non-probands, according to a report published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Silent Infarcts Found in Many Without Stroke History

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- More than 10 percent of subjects without a history of clinical stroke showed at least one silent cerebral infarction on MRI, according to research from a Framingham Offspring Study sample published online June 26 in the journal Stroke.

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Proteins Mediate Inflammatory Response in Arthritis Model

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Two proteins involved in the recognition of pathogens are also involved in the inflammatory response in a mouse model of arthritis, according to study findings published online June 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Improvements Needed for Research Reporting Guidelines

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are dozens of scientific research reporting guidelines and the way in which they are developed is broadly similar, but they also differ in crucial aspects and many developers lack a strategy for the dissemination and implementation of research guides, according to an article published in the June issue of PLoS Medicine.

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Doctors Urged to Take Action on Climate Change

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Just as doctors helped change public attitudes about smoking, they should lead the way in changing attitudes about climate change, according to a Views & Reviews article published June 28 in BMJ.

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Error in CALHM1 Gene Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene CALHM1, found on chromosome 10, may increase the risk of late-onset Alzheimer's disease, researchers report in the June 27 issue of Cell.

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Marijuana Component is Anti-Inflammatory

FRIDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- A compound found in marijuana acts as an anti-inflammatory agent without the psychoactive effects of the drug, according to research published online June 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition.

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Non-Steroidal Drugs Don't Protect Against Melanoma

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) doesn't appear to be associated with a lower risk of melanoma, contrary to data supporting their chemopreventive effects for other site-specific cancers, according to research published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Bisphosphonates Linked to Osteonecrosis of the Jaws

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Because breast cancer patients receiving intravenous bisphosphonates may be at higher risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ), they should receive early referral by oncologists for baseline dental evaluation, according to a report published online June 23 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Video May Help Trim Sexually Transmitted Disease Rates

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- New infections among patients at sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics can be reduced by up to 10 percent by showing a brief educational video in the waiting room, according to an article published in the June issue of PLoS Medicine.

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Mothers Often Engage in Risky Infant Care Practices

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers often engage in infant care practices that increase the risk of sudden infant death, including bed-sharing, placing infants in a prone position for sleep in a bassinet, or cluttering the bassinet with objects that can cause suffocation, according to two studies published online June 26 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Socioeconomic Status Linked to Post-Cancer Mortality

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Low socioeconomic status appears to influence mortality after cancer diagnosis, but community health advocates and patient assistants may help improve the stage of breast cancer diagnosis among a largely underinsured or uninsured population, according to two studies published online June 25 in Cancer.

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Variant Linked to Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- In children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, those with the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val108/158Met polymorphism are more likely to demonstrate poor task-oriented behavior, according to a report published online June 25 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Childhood Intelligence Affects Vascular Dementia Risk

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with vascular dementia are more likely to have had lower cognitive ability scores in childhood than their counterparts without vascular dementia, although there is no association between lower childhood cognitive ability and risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to the results of a study published online June 25 in Neurology.

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High C-Reactive Protein Level Tied to Failed Cardioversion

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Increased levels of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with a greater risk of electrical cardioversion failure in patients with persistent atrial fibrillation, researchers report in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Pain Measurement Tools May Be Too Blunt for Infants

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral assessment may not give an accurate picture of pain in infants because they may process pain at the cortical level and not exhibit any behavioral changes, according to research published in the June issue of PLoS Medicine.

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Screening Tool May Aid Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- A composite tool consisting of a symptom index and the CA-125 blood test identified more than 80 percent of women with early-stage ovarian cancer and may be useful as part of a multi-step screening process for the disease, which is extremely difficult to detect in its early stages, according to study findings published online June 25 in Cancer.

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Rosuvastatin Effective When Taken Twice Weekly

THURSDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Twice-weekly doses of rosuvastatin in patients intolerant of daily statins reduces total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, according to a report published in the June 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Angiotensin II-Receptor Blockers Effective in Marfan's

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Marfan's syndrome, the use of angiotensin II-receptor blockers is associated with a significant decrease in the rate of progressive aortic-root dilation, according to the results of a small study published in the June 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Organ Transplants in Need of Up-Front Consent Policy

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) should create a policy requiring potential organ transplant recipients to go through a comprehensive consent process that allows them to specify whether they'll accept or decline all non-standard organs, according to a Sounding Board feature in the June 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rivaroxaban Found Superior to Enoxaparin

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- In patients undergoing either total hip replacement or total knee replacement, thromboprophylaxis with rivaroxaban is significantly more effective at preventing adverse events than thromboprophylaxis with enoxaparin, according to two studies published in the June 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and one study published online June 25 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Eriksson
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Common Risk Alleles Could Help in Breast Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Assessing a small number of susceptibility alleles could be helpful in identifying women who are genetically at higher risk of breast cancer and make screening programs more efficient, according to the authors of an article in the June 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mouse Model Replicates Some Aspects of Learning Disorders

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A mouse model of tuberous sclerosis, a disorder associated with mental retardation, autism and epilepsy, replicates some aspects of the disorder such as the defects in learning and memory, which can be reversed with a drug, according to study findings published online June 22 in Nature Medicine.

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Source of Cardiomyocyte Progenitors Identified

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A subset of cells present in the epicardium, the epithelial sheet lying over the heart, can migrate into the heart and differentiate into cardiomyocytes, which could be used someday to repair the heart, according to the results of a study published online June 22 in Nature.

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Discovery Points to Factors in Imatinib Resistance

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- LYN kinase may play a role in imatinib resistance in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who don't have BCR-ABL mutations, according to research published in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Cannabinoids Don't Alleviate Acute Nociceptive Pain

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Orally administered cannabis extract did not produce significant analgesic or anti-hyperalgesic effects in two well-established human pain models -- sunburn and intradermal capsaicin -- according to study findings published in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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Imaging Identifies Risk of Recurrent Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A high-resolution imaging method can accurately predict the risk of tumor recurrence in women with invasive breast cancer, researchers report in the July issue of Radiology.

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Pharmaceutical Firms at Cornerstone of Drug Discovery

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Research and development by private sector pharmaceutical companies complements the work of publicly funded research organizations, and they played a crucial role in bringing to market the 35 most important and most commonly prescribed drugs, according to a report published in June in the Manhattan Institute's sixth Medical Progress Report.

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Nurses' Health Study Meets Many Criteria for Success

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- The long-running Nurses' Health Study (NHS) has been successful in terms of three purposes of epidemiology -- discovery of information, development of control and prevention strategies, and delivery of findings -- according to a commentary in the July 2 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Prediction Rule Identifies Risk of Osteoporotic Fracture

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- A prediction rule based on a heel stiffness index and four clinical factors can identify which elderly women are at high risk of osteoporotic fracture, according to a report in the July issue of Radiology.

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Anesthesia Types Used in Combat Injuries Compared

WEDNESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Total intravenous anesthesia, often including ketamine, did not produce better outcomes than volatile gas anesthesia in patients who underwent neurosurgery for combat-related traumatic brain injury, according to a report in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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Radio Frequency Identification May Be Hazardous

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Radio frequency identification can induce potentially hazardous electromagnetic interference in critical care medical equipment, according to research published in the June 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Care Model Improves Blood Pressure Control

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with uncontrolled hypertension can achieve blood pressure control by participating in a new model of care that combines patient Web services, home blood pressure monitoring and pharmacist-assisted care, researchers report in the June 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Outcomes of Drug-Eluting Versus Bare-Metal Stent Analyzed

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The widespread use of drug-eluting stents has decreased the incidence of repeat revascularization but has not increased the risk of death or ST-elevation myocardial infarction compared to the use of bare-metal stents, according to a report published in the June 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Coronary Calcium Score Shows Usefulness in Two Studies

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery calcium (CAC) score was a better predictor for coronary heart disease and total cardiovascular disease than carotid intima-media thickness in middle-aged and older adults, and CAC scoring is effective for stratifying risk even in the elderly, according to studies in the June 23 Archives of Internal Medicine and the July 1 Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Weight Gain Increases Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Weight gain over time increases the risk of developing chronic kidney disease, even in men whose weight is in the normal range, according to the results of a study released online May 21 in advance of publication in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Statins Linked to Rise in Some Oxidized Biomarkers

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of statins in individuals with coronary obstructions leads to increases in oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-100 particles (OxPL/apoB) and malondialdehyde epitopes on apoB particles (MDA/apoB), though these aren't associated with changes in atheroma volume, according to research published in the July 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Guidelines for Treatment of Thrombosis Updated

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) has published updated guidelines for the prevention, treatment and management of thrombosis in populations such as pregnant women, children and hospitalized patients in a supplement to the June issue of Chest.

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Seniors Can Sustain Brain Trauma from Falls

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 8,000 American seniors died in 2005 due to traumatic brain injury sustained as the result of a fall, and almost 56,000 were hospitalized, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published in the June issue of the Journal of Safety Research.

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Overcrowding, Understaffing Stressing Health Care Systems

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital overcrowding and understaffing are putting stress on health care systems and increasing the risk of spreading methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), according to a review in the July issue of The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Automated Imaging Method Identifies Alzheimer's Patients

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- An automated method to measure hippocampal volume can accurately distinguish between patients with Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment or healthy elderly patients, according to research published in the July issue of Radiology.

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Triage Must Comply with Emergency Treatment Act

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- In an emergency department setting, how triage is conducted and who is qualified to conduct triage are two aspects that must comply with the Emergency Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), and compliance is an on-going process, according to an article published in the June issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Preeclampsia May Lead to Decreased Insulin Sensitivity

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of preeclamptic pregnancy respond to increased visceral fat in an enhanced insulin-resistant manner that may be associated with impaired vasodilatation. Also, early-onset preeclampsia is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity later in life, according to the results of a study released online June 23 in advance of publication in the August issue of Hypertension.

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Study Sheds Light on Link Between Smoking, Blood Clots

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smokers show a considerable impairment in thrombin-mediated vascular responses, with inhibition of protease-activated receptor type 1 (PAR-1)-mediated endothelial vasomotor and fibrinolytic ability, according to research published in the July 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Greater Adherence to Healthy Diet Cuts Women's Death Risk

TUESDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women who eat a prudent diet high in vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, poultry and whole grains may have a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular and total mortality compared to women who eat a typical Western diet, according to a report published in the July 15 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Racial Disparities Exist in Colorectal Cancer Screening

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- There are racial disparities in the rate of colorectal cancer screening between different ethnic groups, and interventions are required to mitigate these inequalities, researchers report in the June 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Personal Benefit Motivates Medical Research Participation

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients participated in the Evaluation of Subcutaneous Proleukin (Interleukin-2) in a Randomized International Trial (ESPRIT) study because they hoped to personally benefit from the results, but they also felt a sense of pride in participating to help others, according to a report published in the June 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Subtle Signs Can Reveal Cognitive Decline

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Older community-dwelling adults who have no overt signs of neurological disease but who have multiple subtle neurological abnormalities are at increased risk of cerebrovascular events and mortality, according to study findings published in the June 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Related to Cardiovascular Mortality

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- There is an independent association between low levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality, although a causal link has yet to be established, according to an article published in the June 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Weight Loss Linked to Low Levels of Fat Hormone

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss in obese individuals is associated with changes in brain activity in areas associated with eating behavior that can be reversed by injections of leptin, a hormone secreted by fat cells whose levels appear to fall with weight loss, according to a report published online June 20 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Protein Mediates Damage from Tobacco Pollutants

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Compounds present in cigarette smoke responsible for inflammation of lung nerve endings and respiratory hypersensitivity mediate their effects via an excitatory ion channel, according to a report published online June 20 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Saturated Fat Linked to Poorer Memory, Brain Changes

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- A diet high in cholesterol and saturated fat was associated with memory impairment and hippocampal changes in rats, according to research published in June in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Poor Fitness Linked to Mitochondrial Problems

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with poorer physical fitness, decreased insulin sensitivity, and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, independent of genetic factors, according to the results of a twin study released online May 6 in advance of publication in the American Journal of Physiology - Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation Seen As Healthful

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic whole-body exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation -- principally gamma radiation -- could reduce the incidence of cancer and cancer mortality, according to an article published in the summer issue of the Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons.

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Combined Therapy May Overcome Cancer Drug Resistance

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- A network of signaling is disrupted in cancer cells resistant to gefitinib, and combination treatment with gefitinib and another inhibitor may be able to overcome this resistance, researchers report in the June 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Myelomas Lacking Master Regulator Gene Die

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Myelomas lacking a protein that acts as a master regulator of gene expression die, regardless of the underlying genetic abnormalities, according to research published online June 22 in Nature.

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Lack of Nursing Faculty Threatens Health Care Quality

MONDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The shrinking pool of experienced nurses and nurse faculty is a direct threat to the quality of health care in the United States, according to an article published in the June issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Peacetime Surveys Estimate War Deaths Over 50 Years

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Using data on sibling deaths reported after the end of conflict, over 5 million people died due to war injuries in 13 countries during the period from 1955 to 2002, a far higher estimate than that obtained through eyewitnesses and media reports, according to a report published online June 19 in BMJ Online First.

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Surveillance Systems Could Reduce Injuries in Children

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The creation of a country-wide injury surveillance system for unintentional child and adolescent injuries could help monitor risk and identify ways to reduce injuries in the United Kingdom, according to an editorial published in the June 21 issue of BMJ.

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Allergies Rampant, Poorly Treated in United Kingdom

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Allergies exert a major expense on society and appear to be rising in prevalence, yet the medical profession in the United Kingdom is handling allergies poorly, according to an editorial published in the June 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Article Examines Use of 'Key Opinion Leaders' in Drug Sales

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Influential doctors known as "key opinion leaders" are paid generous fees to influence their peers to prescribe a company's drugs and may in fact be considered salespeople by the industry, according to an article in the June 21 issue of BMJ.

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Combination Asthma Therapy Compared with Steroids Alone

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Salmeterol plus inhaled corticosteroids may decrease the risk for severe exacerbations, but does not appear to lower the risk of hospitalization, asthma-related deaths or intubations compared with inhaled corticosteroids alone, according to a new meta-analysis published in the July issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Bosentan Beneficial in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, was associated with improvements in pulmonary vascular resistance in patients with mildly symptomatic pulmonary arterial hypertension, according to research published in the June 21 issue of The Lancet.

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Oral Fluid Rapid HIV Test Accuracy Questioned

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Oral fluid testing with the OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test is associated with episodic increases in the number of false-positive results, according to a report published in the June 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Diabetics May Be at Increased Risk of Hearing Loss

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is more prevalent among adult diabetics than among the non-diabetic population, according to the results of a study released online June 17 in advance of publication in the July 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Medical Students Need Consent for 'Intimate' Exams

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Asking medical students to perform "intimate" examinations on anesthetized patients without their informed consent is a violation of basic human rights, according to an editorial in the July issue of Student BMJ.

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Experts Discuss Cardiovascular Risks in HIV/AIDS Patients

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The success of antiretroviral drugs has enabled HIV-infected patients to live longer, but recent studies indicate that they are at higher risk of coronary heart disease, which is now a leading cause of death in this population, according to the proceedings of an American Heart Association scientific conference on the topic, published online June 19 in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

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Statins Benefit Kidney Disease Patients with Dyslipidemia

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with mild-to-moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) are prone to abnormal lipid metabolism, which can be treated effectively with statins, but evidence of statins' effectiveness in hemodialysis patients is inconclusive, researchers report in the June 24 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Teletriage May Reduce Misuse of Emergency Departments

FRIDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- A teletriage program based on standardized guidelines and protocols was potentially helpful in alleviating the chaos in emergency departments caused by misuse by non-emergent cases, according to an article published in the June issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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