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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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July 2008 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: August 01, 2008.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for July 2008. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pregestational Diabetes Raises Birth Defect Risk

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women with pregestational diabetes mellitus are more likely than pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus to have a child with birth defects, according to a report published online July 31 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Drugs Mimic Exercise and Increase Endurance

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Two drugs can increase exercise endurance in mice by reprogramming their muscles, according to research published online July 31 in Cell. One drug is effective only in conjunction with exercise while the other is effective even in sedentary mice.

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Deportation Linked to More HIV Infection in Male Mexicans

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The likelihood of HIV infection among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico depends on gender and how long they have lived in Tijuana, with a higher prevalence among males deported from the United States, according to the results of a study published online July 29 in PLoS ONE.

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Glomerular Filtration Screening Should Not Be Universal

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) should not be used to universally screen for chronic kidney disease and should be restricted to high-risk groups due to the potential to falsely diagnose women and particularly the elderly, according to two articles published online July 30 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Abstract - Glassock
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Abstract - Melamed
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Two Different Breast Cancer Screening Programs Compared

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although the organized, population-based screening program in Norway has a longer screening interval, opportunistic mammography screening in Vermont achieves similar outcomes, according to a report published online July 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Joint Replacement Linked to Cardiac Complications

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Among total joint replacement surgery patients, two new risk factors -- revision surgery and bilateral joint replacement -- as well as traditional risk factors increase odds of cardiac complications, according to an article published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Device May Decrease Musculoskeletal Procedure Pain

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- A reciprocating procedure device decreases patient's pain during musculoskeletal procedures, improves outcomes and may decrease needlestick injuries to health care workers, according to an article published in the July issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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United States' AIDS Relief Plan at Crossroads

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has achieved dramatic results so far, thanks to a strong results-oriented focus and sense of urgency, but as Congress reauthorizes funding for the program, it must consider where it goes from here, according to an article published online July 30 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Adverse Outcomes in IVF Babies Analyzed

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Babies conceived spontaneously and as a result of assisted fertilization by the same woman have similar risks of adverse outcomes, meaning that adverse outcomes among assisted fertilization babies may be attributable to the underlying causes of infertility rather than the fertility treatment itself, according to a report published online July 31 in The Lancet.

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Endothelial Function Linked to Cardio Risk in Sedentary

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Endothelial function is significantly associated with cardiovascular risk in women in sedentary professions, with cardiorespiratory fitness being the best predictor of endothelial function, according to study findings published in the Aug. 1 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Genetic Factor Studied in Susceptibility to Migraine

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Carriers of the MTHFR 677C>T genotype who have migraines with aura are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to research published online July 30 in Neurology.

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Mouse Model of Postpartum Depression Developed

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Mice lacking a major target of neurosteroid hormones, which have been implicated in various psychiatric and neurological disorders, display abnormal postpartum behavior and may be a useful model for postpartum depression, researchers report in the July 31 issue of Neuron.

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Bone Marker Linked to Death in Dialysis Patients

THURSDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- High or rising levels of alkaline phosphatase, a marker of bone turnover, are associated with a higher risk of death in patients undergoing dialysis, according to the results of a study published online July 30 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Cyclosporine May Reduce Size of Infarct After Heart Attack

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The use of cyclosporine immediately before percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with myocardial infarction may be associated with a smaller infarct, according to research from the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Smoke-Free Scotland Has Less Acute Coronary Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- After legislation banning smoking in public places was introduced in Scotland, there was a decrease in the number of hospital admissions for acute coronary syndrome, of which 67 percent was accounted for by nonsmokers, according to a study in the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Higher Statin Dose Beneficial in Metabolic Syndrome

WEDNESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- A higher dose of atorvastatin is more effective than a lower dose in reducing biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with metabolic syndrome, according to a study in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Microbicidal HIV Prevention Trial Halted Early

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Cellulose sulfate gel -- investigated as a vaginal microbicide against HIV -- didn't reduce HIV infections and may have even increased the risk in a sample of women, according to research published in the July 31 New England Journal of Medicine.

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Heavier Patients Visiting Cardiac Catheterization Labs

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients weighing as much as 550 pounds are now being seen in cardiovascular catheterization laboratories, creating logistical and safety challenges, according to a study in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Increased Hip Bone Density Linked to Breast Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- In postmenopausal women, hip bone mineral density predicts breast cancer risk independently of the Gail score, suggesting that the two measurements could be used together to better quantify the risk, according to a study published online July 29 in Cancer.

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Nurses Approach Issue of ER Overcrowding

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Staff participation, such as deciding on the criteria for the closure of a hospital emergency department waiting room, is an effective way to conduct research into operational change, according to a study published in the August issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Childhood Cancer Survivors Less Likely to Smoke

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- English childhood cancer survivors are significantly less likely to smoke than the general British population, according to an article published online July 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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FDA Approves First Generic Divalproex Sodium

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved generic versions of Depakote delayed-release tablets (divalproex sodium) for the first time, according to a press release issued by the FDA this week.

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Androgen-Deprivation Therapy May Harm Cognition

WEDNESDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- In men with prostate cancer, androgen-deprivation therapy may be associated with subtle but significant cognitive declines, according to a study published online July 29 in Cancer.

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Heart Failure Hospitalizations at Nearly 4 Million

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalizations for heart failure in the United States increased from 1979 to nearly 4 million in 2004, with more hospitalizations for the elderly and increased costs to Medicare and Medicaid, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Hepatitis C Doesn't Impair CD4 Recovery in HIV Context

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Coinfection with hepatitis C virus does not reduce CD4 recovery in subjects with HIV who are receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy, according to research published in the July AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses.

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Total Knee Arthroplasty Has Long-Term Benefits

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- The physical function benefits of total knee arthroplasty to treat osteoarthritis are sustained beyond five years and are seen in both obese and non-obese patients, according to the results of a study published online July 29 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Endocarditis Discouraged

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Antibiotic prophylaxis should no longer routinely be given to prevent infective endocarditis in patients undergoing dental and other medical procedures, according to updated guidelines published online July 28 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The guidelines were jointly developed by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

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Marine-Derived n-3 Fatty Acids, Atherosclerosis Level Linked

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Marine-derived n-3 fatty acids are associated with decreased intima-media thickness of the carotid artery but not coronary artery calcification in Japanese men, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Statin Use May Decrease Cognitive Impairment

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use is associated with a significant decline in dementia and other cognitive impairment, according to the July 29 issue of Neurology.

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Elevated Cardiac Biomarkers Linked to Higher Mortality

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Apparently healthy older adults with elevated levels of at least one of two plasma biomarkers of cardiovascular disease have a higher risk of death from cardiac and noncardiac causes, according to a study in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Kids' Cancer Survival Low in Many Countries

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Annual per-capita government health expenditures are associated with survival of children with cancer in 10 low- and middle-income countries, and half of these countries offer very poor chances of survival for these children, according to research published in the August issue of The Lancet Oncology.

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Heart Medications Can Affect Heart Imaging

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Heart medications can modify the results of stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) by reducing or eliminating ischemia, according to a review in the Aug. 5 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Dementia Linked to Both High and Low Thyrotropin Levels

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Abnormal thyrotropin levels in women are associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Blood-Based Biomarkers of Prostate Cancer Identified

TUESDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Blood levels of small RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) can distinguish men with prostate cancer from healthy men, according to a study in the July 29 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Hearing Loss More Prevalent Than Previously Reported

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of hearing loss is greater than previously reported, and hearing loss prevention needs to be implemented early, according to an article published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Exercise Is Key for Long-Term Weight Loss

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Sustaining a 10 percent or more weight loss requires fairly high levels of physical activity in combination with reduced energy intake, according to an article published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes-Diet Link Examined in Trio of Studies

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of fruits and vegetables may decrease the risk of diabetes mellitus, while increased consumption of fruit drinks may increase risk, and diets low in fat have no effect on development of diabetes, according to three articles published in the July 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Harding Abstract
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Palmer Abstract
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Fatal Medication Errors Surge Since 1983

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate due to fatal medication errors rose sharply between 1983 and 2004, with particularly steep increases in incidents in the home and deaths from a combination of medications and alcohol or street drugs, according to research published in the July 28 Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Link Needs More Research

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the link between sleep-disordered breathing and cardiovascular disease, more research is needed to explain how these two conditions interact so that sleep medicine specialists and cardiologists can develop a consensus concerning best practice, according to an American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation scientific statement published online July 28 in Circulation.

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Osteoarthritis Increases in British Columbia Sample

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1996 and 2004, the incidence of osteoarthritis rose in British Columbia, Canada, because of aging of the population and other factors, according to research published online June 24 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Taser Injuries Require Preparation in ERs

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Given law enforcement officers' growing use of Tasers and accumulating accounts of deaths from the electroshock devices, emergency nurses and other care providers need to be prepared to handle Taser-related injuries, according to a paper in the August Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Collagen Treatment for Arthritis Holds Appeal

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Oral administration of chicken type II collagen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis resulted in decreased pain and morning stiffness and other beneficial outcomes, according to research published in the July 15 Arthritis Care & Research.

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Medical Errors Have Impact After Hospital Discharge

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Medical errors affect patients in the months after hospital discharge as well as during their hospital stays, leading to excess costs, deaths and hospital readmissions, according to a study published online July 25 in Health Services Research.

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Caffeine Use Still Widespread in Elite Athletes

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) no longer bans caffeine in sports, questions remain on the eve of the Beijing Olympics as to caffeine's real and perceived efficacy in enhancing athletic performance, according to a commentary published in July in BMJ Clinical Evidence.

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Fecal Occult Blood Tests Offer Different Results

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The use of an immunochemical fecal occult blood test (I-FOBT) resulted in higher participation and detection rates for advanced adenomas and cancer than use of a guaiac-based fecal occult blood test (G-FOBT), according to research published in the July Gastroenterology.

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Dementia Rate May Be Underestimated in Some Areas

MONDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Usage of the DSM-IV may markedly underestimate the prevalence of dementia in less developed areas of the world, according to research published online July 28 in The Lancet.

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Nevirapine Dosing Studied in Breast-Feeding Moms with HIV

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- In HIV-infected mothers, risk of HIV transmission to their uninfected breast-feeding infants may be reduced by a prolonged postpartum course of nevirapine, according to an article published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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HIV Transmission Possible Despite Effective Treatment

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- While individual risk of HIV transmission per sexual encounter is fairly small when one partner is effectively treated and the other is seronegative, the rate of transmission over large numbers of sexual encounters may be substantial, according to research published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

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West Nile Virus Cases Reported in 14 States

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- There were 43 cases of West Nile virus reported from 14 states this year up to July 22, according to a report published in the July 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Elderly Sleep Fewer Hours Than Younger People

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The elderly have a lower tendency to sleep during the day and sleep about 1.5 hours less per day than younger people, which could have implications for age-related insomnia, researchers report in the Aug. 5 issue of Current Biology.

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Timing Is Crucial in Measles Vaccination

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The age at which the protective effect of maternal measles antibodies wears off varies widely from region to region and should be taken into account when formulating optimum immunization strategies, according to an editorial published online July 24 in BMJ.

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HIV Survival Increases with Antiretroviral Therapy

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Significant declines in mortality and an increase in life expectancy have been seen among HIV-positive patients using combination antiretroviral therapy, according to study findings published in the July 26 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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White, Middle-Aged Males Most Likely Group to Exercise

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The demographic pattern of participation in exercise and sports changed between 1997 and 2006 in England, with fewer young men exercising and more participation by middle-aged and older adults, according to an article published online July 25 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
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Teledermatology Improves Skin Cancer Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- In the management of skin cancer, teledermatology referral leads to clinical outcomes that equal or even surpass those of conventional referral, according to a report published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Non-Pharmaceutical Fentanyl Linked to Overdose Deaths

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Illicitly manufactured non-pharmaceutical fentanyl was associated with 1,013 deaths in six U.S. counties or states from April 2005 to March 2007, according to a report published in the July 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Population Policy Key to Environmental Protection

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Controlling population growth by providing better access to contraception could help combat global warming by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the human strain on the world's resources, according to an editorial published online July 24 in BMJ.

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On-Site Vaccination Utilized to Control Pertussis Outbreak

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- A school-based vaccination clinic was set up to control an outbreak of pertussis in a Cook County, Ill., high school after multiple recommendations to get vaccinated went unheeded, according to a report published in the July 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vacuum-Assisted Wound Closure Improves Healing

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC) may assist wound healing in spinal procedures complicated by wound infections, according to a report the July issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

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Protein Involved in Regulating Body Clock

FRIDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- The SIRT1 protein is involved in regulating the body clock by controlling the expression of circadian genes and interacting with an important core regulator of the cellular circadian clock machinery, according to two studies in the July 25 issue of Cell.

Abstract- Nakahata
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Abstract - Asher
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Free Plasma Homocysteine Predicts Recurrent Heart Events

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Free plasma homocysteine levels are a significant and independent risk factor for recurrent cardiovascular events for hospitalized patients, while total plasma homocysteine levels have no predictive value, according to an article published in the July 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Tuberculosis Screenings Urged for Psoriasis Patients

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Before psoriasis patients are treated with systemic and biologic agents, they should be screened and treated for latent tuberculosis infections, according to a National Psoriasis Foundation consensus statement published in the August issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Postmenopausal Estrogen May Increase Reflux Symptoms

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Estrogen therapy in postmenopausal women may slightly increase the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux, according to research published in the July issue of Gastroenterology.

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Receptor Activation Inhibits Prostate Cancer Growth

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The liver X receptor (LXR), which had previously been shown to sense cholesterol metabolites, can also reduce androgen production and inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells, according to research published in the August issue of Endocrinology.

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New Laser Technique May Reduce Acne Scars

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with acne scars, ablative fractional resurfacing with a novel 30-watt laser that combines carbon dioxide ablation with a fractional photothermolysis system may significantly improve facial appearance with minimal side effects, according to study findings published in the August issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Drug Restores Heart Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Treating obese mice with Captopril, an inhibitor of the renin-angiotensin system, restores insulin sensitivity in their hearts but does not affect insulin levels or glucose tolerance, researchers report in the August issue of Endocrinology.

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Statin Use May Benefit Kidney Transplant Patients

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- In kidney transplant patients, statin use may be associated with prolonged survival, according to research published online July 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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High Soy Intake Linked to Low Sperm Counts

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Men who consume high levels of soy-containing foods tend to have lower sperm counts, with no effect on sperm motility or morphology, according to research published online July 23 in Human Reproduction.

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Timing of Lymph Node Dissection Studied in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The timing of axillary lymph node dissection does not affect the number of lymph nodes recovered or long-term complications in patients with breast cancer that has metastasized to the sentinel lymph nodes, according to a report in the July 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Treatment Guidelines Issued for Pre-Diabetic Patients

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pre-diabetes may need aggressive lifestyle management, medication, or both to reduce their risk of developing overt diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a Consensus Statement released July 23 in Washington, D.C., by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

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Mitral Regurgitation Therapy Needs Clarification

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Mitral valve repair is the preferred therapy for primary mitral regurgitation, but indications for surgery in secondary mitral regurgitation are less certain, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Accredited Hospitals Give Better Care for Heart Attack

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals with Society of Chest Pain Centers' accreditation are more likely than non-accredited hospitals to comply with Medicare and Medicaid core measures for acute myocardial infarction, according to a report published in the July 15 issue of the American Journal of Cardiology.

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Oxidation Found to Have Role in Cell-Death Alerts

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The different immune system responses following necrosis or apoptosis of cells is influenced by high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) that may be released by the dying cells, as well as by reactive oxygen species (ROS), according to research published in the July 18 issue of Immunity.

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Cognitive Function Poorer with Coronary Heart Disease

THURSDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary heart disease is associated with poor cognitive performance in middle age, with greater declines in cognitive function among men with increased time since first coronary event, according to an article published online July 22 in the European Heart Journal.

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Raltegravir Beneficial in Drug-Resistant HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with drug-resistant HIV, treatment with raltegravir -- an integrase inhibitor -- in combination with optimized background therapy leads to significantly improved viral suppression, according to two studies published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Steigbigel
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'Tier 4' Drugs Raise Questions About Affordability

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The emergence of a fourth tier of copayment for expensive drugs calls into question how Americans are going to handle the rising costs of health care, according to a perspective article in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Genes Implicated in Myopathy in Individuals on Simvastatin

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Variants in the SLC01B1 gene, which plays a role in the hepatic uptake of statins, may raise the risk of myopathy in individuals taking simvastatin, according to research published online July 23 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sorafenib Beneficial in Advanced Liver Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with sorafenib -- an oral multikinase inhibitor -- may benefit patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma, according to research published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Consequences of Genetic Non-Discrimination Act Examined

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- The Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA), recently signed into U.S. law, creates a troublesome distinction between those at genetic risk for a disease and those with other characteristics that predispose them to a condition, according to a perspective article published in the July 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Spinal Cord Neural Stem Cells Migrate into Injury

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A population of neural stem cells lining the central canal of the spinal cord in mice migrate into injured spinal cord and contribute to scar formation, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of PLoS Biology.

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Adjuvant Treatment Improves Pancreatic Cancer Survival

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Four new studies show that the addition of chemotherapy and radiation before or after surgery for pancreatic cancer can improve survival, according to an editorial in the July 20 issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Abstract - Corsini
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Non-Invasive Tests Superior for Predicting Cardiac Events

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A disease score developed from completion of several non-invasive tests may better predict future cardiac events than a risk factor assessment such as the Framingham 10-year risk scores, researchers report in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Memory and Central Auditory Function Related

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A stepwise decline in central auditory function was noted when comparing patients with mild memory impairment and no dementia to Alzheimer's patients with memory loss, according to an article published in the July issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Strong Arguments For and Against Sun's Role in Melanoma

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Whether or not sun exposure is a major cause of melanoma is the subject of two opposing view Head to Head articles, published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Physicians to Get Bonus for Electronic Prescribing

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Doctors using an electronic prescriptions system will be eligible for a bonus from Medicare from 2009 onwards for four years, according to U.S. health officials.

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Risk-Prediction Tool Identifies In-Hospital Mortality Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Application of a risk-prediction algorithm may help identify congestive heart failure patients at high risk of in-hospital mortality, according to an article published in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Drug Abuse Adds to Scotland's Excess Mortality

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of the excess mortality rate in Scotland versus England is due to drug-related deaths, according to a study published online July 22 in BMJ.

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Genetic Variation May Raise HIV Risk in African Americans

WEDNESDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic variation that provides protection from Plasmodium vivax malaria appears to increase susceptibility to HIV infection, according to research published in the July 17 issue of Cell Host & Microbe.

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Shifts in Focus Could Reduce Tuberculosis

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Focusing on some foreign-born individuals with latent tuberculosis infection may represent one of the more effective options for improving TB control in this group in the United States, and a framework of strategic activities in HIV care programs could address pressing global concerns related to TB, according to two studies in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Cain
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Abstract - Havlir
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Sildenafil May Help Women Treated for Depression

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Among women taking serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression, sildenafil may help relieve sexual dysfunction associated with the use of the antidepressants, according to research published in the July 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Treatment for Infertile Men Looks Promising

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- For infertile men with varicoceles, embolization improves sperm count and motility and may aid in pregnancy, researchers report in the August issue of Radiology.

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Drugs Can Reduce Discomfort During Mammography

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Premedication with lidocaine can help reduce discomfort in women who expect pain during mammography screening and make it more likely they will continue to undergo regular screening, according to a report released online July 22 in advance of publication in the September issue of Radiology.

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Gender Affects Heart's Response to Obesity

TUESDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Myocardial metabolic responses to obesity significantly vary by gender, according to the results of a study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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