Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Allergy | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

AAD: Atopic Dermatitis Precursor for Food Allergies

Last Updated: February 08, 2011.

 

Guidelines suggest children <5 years with atopic dermatitis should be evaluated for food allergies

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Atopic dermatitis appears to be a strong precursor for food allergies rather than a consequence of them, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology, held from Feb. 4 to 8 in New Orleans.

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic dermatitis appears to be a strong precursor for food allergies rather than a consequence of them, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology, held from Feb. 4 to 8 in New Orleans.

Jon M. Hanifin, M.D., of the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, discussed the link between atopic dermatitis and food allergies, as well as the new food allergy guidelines issued in December 2010 by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).

In a five-year multi-center study, Hanifin and colleagues found that 15 percent of infants aged 3 to 18 months with mild cases of atopic dermatitis had definite food allergies, with those with more severe atopic dermatitis having a higher incidence of developing food allergies. Hanifin noted that, in most cases, children experience atopic dermatitis before food allergies. According to the new NIAID guidelines, children less than 5 years of age with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis should be considered for food allergy evaluation for milk, egg, peanut, wheat, and soy, if the child has persistent atopic dermatitis despite optimized management and topical therapy and/or has a reliable history of an immediate reaction after ingestion of a specific food.

"Considering that 6 to 10 percent of children have atopic dermatitis and that up to one-third of those individuals may have documented food allergy, the number of these children affected by food allergies may be significant. In most cases, patients experience atopic dermatitis before food allergies, so it is important for parents of infants and small children affected by this skin condition to be aware of the risk of food allergies," Hanifin said in a statement.

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Faster Preemie Weight Gain Tied to Better Lung Function Next: AAD: Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Incidence in U.S. Rising

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.