Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Infections | AIDS | Pharmacy | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

CROI: Rectal Gel May Guard Against HIV

Last Updated: February 28, 2011.

 

Early phase study shows tenovofir has antiviral effect when applied rectally for a week

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Tenofovir gel, developed to protect against HIV during vaginal sex, appears to have a strong antiviral effect when used in the rectum, according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, held from Feb. 27 to March 2 in Boston.

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Tenofovir gel, developed to protect against HIV during vaginal sex, appears to have a strong antiviral effect when used in the rectum, according to a study presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections, held from Feb. 27 to March 2 in Boston.

Peter Anton, M.D., the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues tested tenofovir gel and oral tenofovir in 18 sexually abstinent, HIV-negative men and women to compare the anti-HIV activity of a single dose of oral tenofovir to a single dose of rectally-applied tenofovir; the second regimen of the trial compared one-week rectal application of tenofovir gel or a placebo gel.

The researchers found that the single dose of tenofovir gel had a slight, but not statistically significant antiviral effect, while the single oral dose of tenofovir offered no protection. HIV was, however, significantly inhibited in the patients who applied the gel daily for a week compared with those who used the placebo gel.

"These kinds of efforts early in the development phase of rectal microbicides can give us insight into a particular product's potential efficacy, which enables us to better design and hasten the pace of future clinical trials," Anton said in a statement.

Both the oral and topical formulations of tenofovir were developed by Gilead Sciences Inc. and CONRAD. Gilead and CONRAD provided study products free of charge.

Press Release
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Edarbi Approved for Treatment of Hypertension Next: Cigarette Smoking Associated With Congenital Heart Defects

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.