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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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February 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: March 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for February 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cigarette Smoking Associated With Congenital Heart Defects

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who smoke cigarettes during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase their offspring's risk for congenital heart defects (CHDs), according to research published online Feb. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Edarbi Approved for Treatment of Hypertension

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Edarbi (azilsartan medoxomil) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with hypertension.

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Cardiovascular Risk Factors Linked to Hearing Impairment

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk factors may play an important role in age-related hearing dysfunction, a common condition in middle-aged adults, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Raised Risk of Pulmonary Embolism in Specific Cancers

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is significantly higher for outpatients with central nervous system (CNS), pancreatic, upper gastrointestinal, and lung/pleural malignancies, and lower for hematological and breast malignancies, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Cancer.

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Intensive Diabetes Treatment May Slow Atherosclerosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes slows the progression of atherosclerosis during a 12-year period after therapy, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes.

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Air Pollution Is Important Trigger of Heart Attacks

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution triggers about the same number of myocardial infarctions as individual risk factors such as physical exertion and alcohol and coffee consumption, according to research published online Feb. 24 in The Lancet.

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Review Finds Alcohol Intake Tied to Lower Heart Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Light to moderate alcohol consumption appears to have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to two meta-analyses published online Feb. 22 in BMJ.

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Aspirin May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Atherosclerosis Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin therapy may lower the risk of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes with mild renal dysfunction, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Stent Thrombosis Most Likely to Occur in Early Morning

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery stent thrombosis tends to follow circadian and seasonal fluctuations, occurring most frequently in the early morning and during the summer, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Office-Based Tests Identify Unsafe Drivers After Stroke

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Several office-based tests on road safety can be administered to post-stroke patients to identify those individuals at risk of failing an on-road evaluation, according to a review published in the February issue of Neurology.

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Obesity Independently Tied to Risk of Fatal Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is independently associated with fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), irrespective of other known biological or social risk factors, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Heart.

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Increasing Triglycerides Tied to Ischemic Stroke Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with an increasing risk of ischemic stroke in both men and women, and high cholesterol levels are associated with ischemic stroke risk in men only, according to research published online Feb. 18 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Considerable Lack of Test Result Follow-Up in Hospitals

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Failure to follow up on test results is a considerable problem, which can negatively impact patient health, according to a review published in the February issue of BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Low Pay for New Female Doctors Tied to Gender, Not Job

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, male physicians who were newly trained in New York State made an average of $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Warfarin Lot Being Recalled Due to Mislabeled Bottle

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Upsher-Smith Laboratories Inc. is voluntarily recalling a single lot of warfarin after one bottle labeled to contain 3 mg tablets was found to contain 10 mg tablets, the company and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have announced.

More Information

New Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral Strategies Beneficial

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A combined approach of automatic referral and communication with patients achieves the highest reported rates of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) utilization, according to a study published in the Feb. 14 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New U.S. Report on the Nation's Health 2010 Released

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics' 34th annual report, presenting the latest information on health status and determinants, utilization of health care, health care resources, expenditures, and a special feature on death and dying, was published Feb. 16.

More Information

Thoracic Spine Screw Shift May Endanger the Aorta

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Thoracic pedicle screws, used in surgical correction of scoliosis, may shift over time due to structural failure of bone, making the aorta susceptible to irritation or penetration from laterally oriented or breached screws, according to a study published in the Feb. 1 issue of Spine.

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Cardiac Resynchronization Aids Less Symptomatic Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), which reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced heart failure, also reduces mortality and frequency of heart failure-related hospitalizations in patients with milder heart failure, according to a review published online Feb. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Most Recalled Medical Devices Given Lenient Approval

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical devices recalled from 2005 to 2009 for risk of serious health hazard or death were approved by the less strict 510(k) process intended for devices considered low or moderate risk, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Disease Prevention Guidelines for Women Updated

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Practical medical advice that works in the "real world," taking into account personal and socioeconomic realities, may more successfully prevent cardiovascular disease in women than recommendations based only on research findings, according to an update to the American Heart Association (AHA) guideline for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in women, published online Feb. 14 in Circulation.

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Dietary Fiber Consumption Linked to Reduced Mortality

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary fiber consumption is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause death in both men and women, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New Drug Offers Alternative to Warfarin

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have issued an updated guideline, describing the newly approved medication dabigatran as an alternative to warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation who need anticoagulation therapy; the guideline update has been published online Feb. 14 in Circulation.

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Researchers Explore Nature of Difficult Clinical Encounters

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Both patients and physicians can bring qualities to a clinical encounter that result in its being perceived as difficult, and patients involved in these types of encounters have worse short-term outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Too Much, Too Little Sleep Affects Cardio Outcomes

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Both short and long sleep duration are associated with increased risk for cardiovascular events, according to research published online Feb. 7 in the European Heart Journal.

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CDC: Smoking Prevalence in Minnesota Down

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In Minnesota, tobacco control efforts to limit the harm caused by tobacco use appear to have substantially reduced the state's smoking prevalence, according to data published in the Feb. 11 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin May Not Prevent Thrombosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) - Low-dose low-molecular-weight-heparin (LMWH) does not effectively prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in high-risk pregnant women, according to a study published online Jan. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Hemodynamic Monitoring Affects Heart Failure Admissions

THURSDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- New York Heart Association (NYHA) class III heart failure patients managed by a wireless implantable hemodynamic monitoring (W-IHM) system require fewer hospitalizations, according to a study published online Feb. 10 in The Lancet.

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Systemic Vasculitis Cardiac Risk Factors Identified

THURSDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients diagnosed with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and microscopic polyangiitis (MPA) are at greater cardiovascular (CV) risk, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Few Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Get Lipids Screen

THURSDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Primary lipid screening was carried out in less than half of eligible rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, many of whom see their rheumatologist as often or more than their primary care provider (PCP), according to a study published online Jan. 18 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Public Sector Plays Big Role in Drug Research

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Public-sector research institutions (PSRIs) appear to play a bigger role in drug discovery than was previously thought, contributing to the discovery of about 10 to 20 percent of drugs approved for new drug applications since 1990, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Elevated Biomarkers Predict Mortality Post-Bypass Surgery

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increased levels of creatine-kinase (CK-MB) and troponin in the first 24 hours after coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery are associated with increased intermediate and long-term mortality, according to a review published in the Feb. 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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MRI-Compatible Pacemaker Approved

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The first heart pacemaker designed to be used safely during certain MRI exams has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

this approval

Nurses' Work Burden Linked to Patient Mortality

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Long work hours among nurses are associated with an increased patient risk of acute myocardial infarction and mortality from pneumonia, according to research published in the January/February issue of Nursing Research.

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Metabolic Syndrome Doesn't Affect Female Sexual Function

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome appears to have little impact on sexual function in middle- to old-aged women, according to a study published online Jan. 14 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Radiation Exposure After Heart Attack May Raise Cancer Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Acute myocardial infarction patients exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation for cardiac imaging or therapeutic procedures may be at an increased risk for developing cancer, according to research published online Feb. 7 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Shows Gender Link

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is more effective at reducing heart failure events and mortality in women than in men, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Hasten Cognitive Decline

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components appear to have a deleterious effect on cognitive function in older adults, according to research published online Feb. 2 in Neurology.

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More Screen Time Linked to Slower Heart Rate Recovery

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged screen-viewing time appears to slow the rate at which the heart returns to normal after exertion, according to research published online Jan. 17 in Heart Asia.

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Incidence of ST-Segment Elevation MI Decreasing

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence rate of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has decreased in recent years, as has long-term mortality in patients with STEMI and non-STEMI, according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

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Stroke-Related Mortality Lower for Blacks Than Whites

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have lower mortality rates than whites following acute ischemic stroke, and they are more likely to receive life-sustaining interventions, according to research published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Global Obesity Prevalence Nearly Double 1980 Levels

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although many of the world's regions have experienced falling blood pressure and cholesterol levels, the prevalence of obesity has nearly doubled since 1980; three papers documenting trends in these health indicators have been published online Feb. 4 in The Lancet.

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Rare Stroke Affects Pregnant and Postpartum Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has compiled a series of evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and specifically for its management during pregnancy and postpartum, detailed in a statement published online Feb. 3 in Stroke.

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Among Statin Users, Smoking Cessation Deserves Emphasis

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients taking statins for coronary heart disease (CHD), smokers are still more likely to suffer a major cardiovascular event (MCVE), when compared with nonsmokers, according to a study published in the Jan. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Pediatric Stroke Survivors Have Lower Quality of Life

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in terms of overall well-being of pediatric stroke survivors is lower compared with healthy controls, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Arterial and Joint Calcifications May Have Genetic Basis

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers may have identified a genetic basis for symptomatic arterial and joint calcifications, according to research published in the Feb. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Maternal Stroke Associated With Heart Disease in Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Female patients who have acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are more likely to have a familial history of stroke in a female first-degree relative (FDR) than a male FDR, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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Half With Hypertension Don't Have it Controlled

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one-half of Americans with hypertension and two-thirds with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) do not have their condition under control, with individuals lacking health insurance having the lowest rates of control, according to two reports published in the Feb. 1 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Gastric Bypass Surgery Improves Cardiac Function

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Marked weight loss after gastric bypass surgery (GBS) is associated with reversal of unfavorable cardiac remodeling and improved left and right ventricular function, according to a study published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Periodontal Disease, hs-CRP Synergistic in Hypertension

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- In middle-aged adults with untreated hypertension, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and periodontal disease have a synergistic effect on levels of urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR), according to a study published in the January issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Increased Mobility Loss in Women With Arterial Disease

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have faster functional decline and increased mobility loss compared to men, according to a study published in the Feb. 8 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Guidelines for Carotid, Vertebral Artery Disease Issued

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association, American Stroke Association, American College of Cardiology, and other groups have issued guidelines for screening and care of extracranial carotid and vertebral artery disease; the guidelines have been published online Jan. 31 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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