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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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February 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: March 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for February 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cigarette Smoking Associated With Congenital Heart Defects

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women who smoke cigarettes during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase their offspring's risk for congenital heart defects (CHDs), according to research published online Feb. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Edarbi Approved for Treatment of Hypertension

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Edarbi (azilsartan medoxomil) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with hypertension.

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Guidance Given for Antipyretic Use in Febrile Children

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Antipyretics should be used judiciously when treating children with fever, and the goal should be the child's comfort rather than normal temperature, according to a clinical report published online Feb. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Less Cerebral Oxygenation Seen in Prone-Sleeping Infants

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants experience decreased cerebral oxygenation while sleeping on their stomachs, which may give insight into the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome associated with prone sleeping, according to research published online Feb. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Trial Results May Have Influenced PSA Testing Trend

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing of men for prostate cancer appears to have declined slightly since the 2009 publication of trials with conflicting findings on the effect of PSA testing on mortality, according to research published online Feb. 28 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Adequate Breast-Feeding Tied to Less Childhood Adiposity

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adequate breast-feeding of a baby exposed to diabetes in utero may protect against childhood adiposity, according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Peer Support Services Improve Depressive Symptoms

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Peer support interventions decrease symptoms of depression more than usual care alone, and at least as much as group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), according to a meta-analysis published in the January/February issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Educational Intervention for Skin Self-Examination Effective

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) are receptive to performing skin self-examinations (SSE) and acting on recommendations from an education intervention when they discover a concerning skin lesion, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Distress Before Fertility Treatment Not Tied to Outcome

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The emotional distress some women experience prior to undergoing fertility treatment appears to have no bearing on the likelihood that the treatment will result in a successful pregnancy, according to a literature analysis published Feb. 23 in BMJ.

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Androgenic Alopecia Tied to Prostate Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) - Early-onset androgenic alopecia is associated with the development of prostate cancer later in life, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in the Annals of Oncology.

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Cardiovascular Risk Factors Linked to Hearing Impairment

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular risk factors may play an important role in age-related hearing dysfunction, a common condition in middle-aged adults, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Denosumab May Delay Skeletal-Related Events

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Denosumab prevents skeletal-related events for longer than zoledronic acid in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases, according to research published online Feb. 25 in The Lancet.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity No Indication for Biopsy

FRIDAY, Feb. 25 (HealthDay News) -- A current guideline on early detection of prostate cancer, which recommends biopsy based on high prostate-specific antigen (PSA) velocity even without other indications, may lead to many unnecessary biopsies, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Return to Work Delayed After Lumbar Fusion

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar fusion surgery is associated with poor return to work (RTW) status, as well as increased disability, opiate use, reoperations, and complications, according to research published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Dietary Patterns May Influence Kidney Health

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A diet high in red and processed meats and sweets may lead to microalbuminuria and rapid kidney function decline, but a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains may protect against rapid estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decline, according to research published in the February issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.

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Equations Predict Quadriceps Strength in Knee Osteoarthritis

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Predictive equations can be used to assess maximal quadriceps strength in individuals who have osteoarthritis in a knee joint, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Intensive Diabetes Treatment May Slow Atherosclerosis

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive treatment of type 1 diabetes slows the progression of atherosclerosis during a 12-year period after therapy, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes.

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Eating Breakfast Tied to Lower BMI in Postpartum Teens

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Postpartum teens who eat breakfast on most days consume fewer calories from snacks and sweetened drinks, and have a lower body mass index (BMI) than those who tend to skip breakfast, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Early Appendectomy Favored in Youths

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children with perforated appendicitis who undergo an appendectomy within 24 hours of hospital admission spend significantly less time away from normal activities and experience fewer adverse events compared to those who undergo removal six to eight weeks after diagnosis, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Later Onset of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Revealed

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The trend toward the earlier onset of childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) is undergoing a statistically significant reversal in Sweden, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes.

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Air Pollution Is Important Trigger of Heart Attacks

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution triggers about the same number of myocardial infarctions as individual risk factors such as physical exertion and alcohol and coffee consumption, according to research published online Feb. 24 in The Lancet.

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Melanoma May Affect Women's Quality of Life More Than Men's

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma has a greater impact on health-related quality of life for women than for men, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Family Mealtime Interaction Affects Children's Health

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The health of children with persistent asthma is linked to the quality of social interaction with their families during mealtime, according to a study published in the January/February issue of Child Development.

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Microbial Exposure May Protect Against Asthma

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be an inverse relationship between asthma and exposure to a wide variety of microbes, according to comparative analyses of children who grow up on farms and those who do not; the results have been published in the Feb. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Underweight Tied to Higher Death Risk in All Asian Groups

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Among all Asian populations, underweight is associated with a substantially increased risk of death, but the excess death risk related to a high body mass index (BMI) is seen only among East Asians, according to the results of a large pooled analysis published in the Feb. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Distinctions Found Between Types of Hemoglobin H Disease

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with hemoglobin H disease caused by hemoglobin H Constant Spring (HCS) appear to be at much higher risk for poor outcomes than those whose disease is caused by deletion of three out of four α-globin genes (HbH), according to research published in the Feb. 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Brain Waves Used to Identify Autism Disorders in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new noninvasive test, using the standard electroencephalogram (EEG) to compute modified multiscale entropy (mMSE), may be a useful predictor of an infant's risk for autism, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in BMC Medicine.

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Bupropion Improves Sexual Function in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes who are treated with bupropion (BU) for major depressive disorder (MDD) show significant improvement in sexual function, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Ultrasound Detects Silent Enthesitis in Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasonography with power Doppler (US-PD) may detect clinically silent enthesitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and other enthesitis-related arthritis, according to research published online Feb. 10 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Herpes Zoster Risk Tied to COPD

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially those using oral steroids, are at increased risk of developing herpes zoster, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Nitroglycerin Strengthens Bones in Older Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Nitroglycerin ointment appears to increase bone mineral density (BMD) and decrease bone resorption in postmenopausal women when administered daily, according to research published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Review Finds Alcohol Intake Tied to Lower Heart Disease Risk

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Light to moderate alcohol consumption appears to have a protective effect against cardiovascular disease, according to two meta-analyses published online Feb. 22 in BMJ.

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Type 1 Diabetes Tied to Shorter Breast-Feeding Duration

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Although mothers with type 1 diabetes are less likely to partially or exclusively breast-feed at two months, diabetes is not an independent risk factor for the initiation and maintenance of breast-feeding, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Breast Cancer History Lowers Accuracy of Mammogram

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mammography screening for breast cancer may be less accurate among women with a personal history of breast cancer (PHBC), despite a higher underlying cancer rate, relative to women without PHBC, according to a study published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Prolonged Bisphosphonate Use Tied to Fracture Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bisphosphonate therapy lasting more than five years is associated with an increased risk of subtrochanteric or femoral shaft fractures in older women, according to a study published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Aspirin May Lower Type 2 Diabetes Atherosclerosis Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Low-dose aspirin therapy may lower the risk of atherosclerotic events in patients with type 2 diabetes with mild renal dysfunction, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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FDA Issues Label Changes for Antipsychotic Drug Class

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care providers that the Pregnancy section of drug labels for the entire class of antipsychotic drugs has been updated. The new drug labels include additional and consistent information regarding the potential risk for abnormal muscle movements (extrapyramidal signs [EPS]) and withdrawal symptoms among newborns whose mothers received the drugs in the third trimester of pregnancy.

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Structured Self-Monitoring Improves Glycemic Control

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Structured self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) improves glycemic control in patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes who do not use insulin, according to a study published in the February issue of Diabetes Care.

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Children With Hepatitis C May Benefit From Ribavirin

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG) plus ribavirin is better than PEG plus placebo for treating children infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Stent Thrombosis Most Likely to Occur in Early Morning

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery stent thrombosis tends to follow circadian and seasonal fluctuations, occurring most frequently in the early morning and during the summer, according to a study published in the February issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions.

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Office-Based Tests Identify Unsafe Drivers After Stroke

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Several office-based tests on road safety can be administered to post-stroke patients to identify those individuals at risk of failing an on-road evaluation, according to a review published in the February issue of Neurology.

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Gastric Bypass, Duodenum Exclusion Effective in Diabetes

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Gastric bypass surgery with duodenum exclusion is more likely than sleeve gastrectomy without duodenum exclusion to result in remission of type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Surgery. According to a related article in the same issue, laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has a better risk-benefit profile than laparoscopic gastric banding.

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Obesity Independently Tied to Risk of Fatal Heart Attack

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is independently associated with fatal coronary heart disease (CHD), irrespective of other known biological or social risk factors, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Heart.

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Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid Beneficial for Children

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) fitting can be beneficial for children with bilateral or unilateral conductive hearing loss, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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New Therapy for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to standard therapy, quadruple therapy is better at eliminating Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in adults and should be considered as the first-line treatment in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in The Lancet.

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Multiple Concussions in Youth Tied to Various Issues

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- High school athletes with a history of multiple concussions appear to have more cognitive, physical, and sleep problems, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Neurosurgery.

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Many Young Drinkers Get Drinks From Home

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- About 709,000 adolescents aged 12 to 14 in the United States report drinking in the last month, and a substantial number of them get their alcohol from family or at home, according to new research released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Increasing Triglycerides Tied to Ischemic Stroke Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with an increasing risk of ischemic stroke in both men and women, and high cholesterol levels are associated with ischemic stroke risk in men only, according to research published online Feb. 18 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Videos Accessible on YouTube

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) videos on YouTube are accessible to the general public and are positively rated and frequently viewed, according to a study published online Feb. 21 in Pediatrics.

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Immunosuppressants Benefit Children With Liver Failure

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who have liver failure respond well to immunosuppression therapy and can delay or avoid liver transplants, according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Fostamatinib Safe, Not Effective in Rheumatoid Arthritis

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Fostamatinib disodium (R788), an oral spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is safe but ineffective for treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who failed biologic therapies, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Long Maternal Working Hours Linked to Children's BMI

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in the total time that a mother is employed is associated with an increase in her child's body mass index (BMI), according to a study published in the January/February issue of Child Development.

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Teen Drinking May Lead to Adult Alcohol Dependence

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that higher alcohol consumption in late adolescence continues into adulthood and is associated with alcohol-related problems such as dependence, according to a literature review published online Feb. 8 in PLoS Medicine.

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Considerable Lack of Test Result Follow-Up in Hospitals

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Failure to follow up on test results is a considerable problem, which can negatively impact patient health, according to a review published in the February issue of BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Hyperprolactinemia Diagnosis Sufficient With Single Test

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- One serum blood test is sufficient to diagnose hyperprolactinemia, and dynamic testing of prolactin secretion should be avoided, according to new guidelines published in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Low Pay for New Female Doctors Tied to Gender, Not Job

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, male physicians who were newly trained in New York State made an average of $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Different Therapies Improve Chronic Fatigue Outcomes

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For chronic fatigue patients, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) may moderately improve outcomes when added to specialist medical care (SMC), according to research published online Feb. 18 in The Lancet.

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Decreased Glaucoma Risk Seen in Obese Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity in women is linked to increased intraocular pressure and a reduced risk of developing open-angle glaucoma (OAG), according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Insomnia in Arthritis Tied to Pain, Depression Ups Risk

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep disturbances are more prevalent among adults with arthritis compared to those without the disease, with the greatest risk affecting those with anxiety and depression, according to a study published in the February issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Pediatric Kingella Kingae Cases Require Vigilance

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the subtle clinical presentation of Kingella kingae (K. kingae) infection, it is increasingly becoming recognized as a common cause of pediatric diseases, highlighting the importance of a high index of suspicion, according to a review published online Feb. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Exercise Improves Executive Function in Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is associated with improved executive function and mathematical achievement in children, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Psychology.

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Noninvasive Method Accurately Identifies Trisomy 21

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Plasma DNA sequencing using circulating cell-free fetal (ccff) DNA can be used as an accurate noninvasive method of detecting trisomy 21, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Alcohol Intoxication Increases Sleep Disruption in Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol intoxication elevates subjective sleepiness and disrupts sleep objectively in women more than in men, regardless of family history of alcoholism, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Quality of Diabetes Social Networking Sites Varies

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The quality and safety of diabetes social networking (SN) sites vary, but observed better practice indicates that improvement is possible, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

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Warfarin Lot Being Recalled Due to Mislabeled Bottle

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Upsher-Smith Laboratories Inc. is voluntarily recalling a single lot of warfarin after one bottle labeled to contain 3 mg tablets was found to contain 10 mg tablets, the company and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration have announced.

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FDA Warns Against Terbutaline for Preterm Labor

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Injectable terbutaline should not be used for prevention or prolonged treatment of preterm labor in pregnant women because of the potential for serious maternal heart problems and death, according to a warning issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The agency also warned that oral terbutaline should not be used for prevention or any treatment of preterm labor because of similar safety concerns and the fact that it has not been shown to be effective.

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CDC: U.S. Influenza Activity Rates Up Since Mid-December

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza activity rates began increasing in mid-December 2010, and influenza-related hospitalizations have been highest among very young children and the elderly, according to a report in the Feb. 18 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Oral Bisphosphonates May Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of oral bisphosphonates for more than one year in postmenopausal women is associated with a 59 percent decrease in the relative risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Number of Pediatric Injuries Involving Cribs Fairly High

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For every 10,000 children younger than 2 years in the United States, there are slightly more than 12 injuries related to cribs, playpens, and bassinets that result in an emergency department visit each year, according to research published online Feb. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Gallstones Linked to Increased Risk of Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with ultrasound documented gallstone disease or evidence of cholecystectomy have increased mortality from all causes and increased mortality related to cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Earlier Puberty Tied to Greater Bone Mass

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Bone mass and bone density in healthy adolescent males and females are inversely related to the age at which puberty starts, according to research published in the January issue of The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Raised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Risk for Smokers

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with an increased risk for those who started smoking at a younger age, according to a study published in the February issue of Archives of Neurology.

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Analgesic Efficacy Altered by Patient Beliefs

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An individual's expectation of a drug's effect influences both its therapeutic efficacy and the pain-related brain pathways that are activated during treatment, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Leisure Inactivity Levels Highest in U.S. South, Appalachia

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Levels of leisure-time inactivity vary around the country, but the proportion of U.S. adults who do not engage in physical activity outside of work is highest -- nearly 30 percent -- in parts of the South and Appalachia, according to estimates released Feb. 16 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Bevacizumab Monotherapy Effective for Infant Retinopathy

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Bevacizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, appears to be more beneficial for zone I stage 3+ retinopathy of prematurity than laser treatment, though more research is needed to determine the therapy's safety, according to research published in the Feb. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New U.S. Report on the Nation's Health 2010 Released

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics' 34th annual report, presenting the latest information on health status and determinants, utilization of health care, health care resources, expenditures, and a special feature on death and dying, was published Feb. 16.

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Mammogram Sensitivity Varies by Week of Menstrual Cycle

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Premenopausal women who schedule regular mammograms may benefit by undergoing screening during the first week of their menstrual cycle, according to research published in the February issue of Radiology.

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Zinc May Reduce Duration and Severity of Common Cold

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Zinc taken within 24 hours of common cold symptoms reduces symptom duration and severity; and preventive zinc therapy in children reduces cold incidence, missing school, and antibiotic prescriptions, according to a review published online Feb. 16 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Child Outpatient Pneumonia Rates Unaffected by Vaccine

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Despite introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2000, incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) did not change between 1997 and 2004, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Cardiac Resynchronization Aids Less Symptomatic Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), which reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with advanced heart failure, also reduces mortality and frequency of heart failure-related hospitalizations in patients with milder heart failure, according to a review published online Feb. 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Increased Errors With Liquid Medications and Inhalers

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The administration of medicines in liquid form, or by devices such as inhalers, injections, or transdermals, is associated with a significantly increased likelihood of errors, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Hospital Readmissions Higher for Blacks Than for Whites

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks tend to have a higher level of hospital readmissions than whites, and, in children, a small percentage of patients with recurrent admissions make up a fairly large proportion of overall admissions, according to two articles published in the Feb. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Dementia Risk Increases With Severity of Hearing Loss

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is independently associated with incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Higher Bilirubin Tied to Lower Respiratory Disease Risk

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with bilirubin levels in the normal range, an increased level is associated with a reduced risk of respiratory disease and all-cause death, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Blood-Borne Infection Risk Dropping Among Drug Users

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) declined from 1988 to 2008, while infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has decreased but is still significant, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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MRI With Mammography Useful for High-Risk Women

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- When used together with mammography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a useful screening tool for high-risk women who have undergone chest irradiation, according to research published online Feb. 15 in Radiology.

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Most Recalled Medical Devices Given Lenient Approval

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical devices recalled from 2005 to 2009 for risk of serious health hazard or death were approved by the less strict 510(k) process intended for devices considered low or moderate risk, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Disease Prevention Guidelines for Women Updated

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Practical medical advice that works in the "real world," taking into account personal and socioeconomic realities, may more successfully prevent cardiovascular disease in women than recommendations based only on research findings, according to an update to the American Heart Association (AHA) guideline for the prevention of cardiovascular disease in women, published online Feb. 14 in Circulation.

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Developmental Delays More Likely in Late Preterm Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm infants are more likely than term infants to have mental or physical developmental delays and poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes, according to research published online Feb. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity, Arthritis Shorten Quality-Adjusted Life-Years

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of quality-adjusted life-years are lost due to knee osteoarthritis and obesity, with a disproportionate number of black and Hispanic women affected, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Abnormal Hand Control May Indicate ADHD Severity

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Hand movement control measurements can be used in determining the severity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to two studies published in the Feb. 15 issue of Neurology.

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Corticosteroid Effective Asthma Rescue Addition

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled corticosteroids as rescue medication with albuterol may be a useful step-down strategy for children with well-controlled, mild asthma as it is more effective at reducing exacerbations than is use of rescue albuterol alone in this population, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in The Lancet.

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Dietary Fiber Consumption Linked to Reduced Mortality

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary fiber consumption is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause death in both men and women, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New Drug Offers Alternative to Warfarin

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) and the American Heart Association (AHA) have issued an updated guideline, describing the newly approved medication dabigatran as an alternative to warfarin for patients with atrial fibrillation who need anticoagulation therapy; the guideline update has been published online Feb. 14 in Circulation.

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Researchers Explore Nature of Difficult Clinical Encounters

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Both patients and physicians can bring qualities to a clinical encounter that result in its being perceived as difficult, and patients involved in these types of encounters have worse short-term outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Different Black Box Warnings Common in Same-Class Drugs

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Labeling differences of black box warnings (BBWs) in drugs of the same class are common and affect perceptions of safety of similar agents, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Undefined Liver Failure Linked to Acetaminophen

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) from an uncertain cause have a relatively high prevalence of unrecognized acetaminophen toxicity, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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Increase Seen in Pediatric Running Injuries

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A growing number of children are injuring themselves while running, suggesting a need for scientific, evidence-based research to create guidelines that will help reduce pediatric running-related injuries, according to a study in the February issue of Clinical Pediatrics.

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