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Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

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February 2011 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: March 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for February 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Type of Radiation Used Affects Response in Anal Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with anal canal squamous cell carcinoma (SCCA), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is associated with less toxicity, fewer and shorter treatment breaks, and good overall survival (OS) and locoregional control (LRC) compared with conventional radiotherapy (CRT), according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Cancer.

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Radioembolization Promising in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) have similar survival times whether they are treated with chemoembolization or radioembolization with Yttrium-90, but radioembolization results in less toxicity and longer time-to-progression, according to a study in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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Raised Risk of Pulmonary Embolism in Specific Cancers

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is significantly higher for outpatients with central nervous system (CNS), pancreatic, upper gastrointestinal, and lung/pleural malignancies, and lower for hematological and breast malignancies, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Cancer.

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Esophageal Eosinophilic Infiltration Responsive to PPI Rx

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy may bring about remission of esophageal eosinophilic infiltration (EEI), calling into question the use of EEI as a histological tool to diagnose eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Livers of Live or Dead Donors Offer Similar Survival

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrence and survival outcomes are similar for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following living donor liver transplant (LDLT) and deceased donor liver transplant (DDLT), according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Hepatology.

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Children With Hepatitis C May Benefit From Ribavirin

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of pegylated interferon (PEG) plus ribavirin is better than PEG plus placebo for treating children infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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New Therapy for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to standard therapy, quadruple therapy is better at eliminating Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in adults and should be considered as the first-line treatment in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in The Lancet.

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Immunosuppressants Benefit Children With Liver Failure

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) who have liver failure respond well to immunosuppression therapy and can delay or avoid liver transplants, according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Low Pay for New Female Doctors Tied to Gender, Not Job

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, male physicians who were newly trained in New York State made an average of $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Oral Bisphosphonates May Lower Colorectal Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of oral bisphosphonates for more than one year in postmenopausal women is associated with a 59 percent decrease in the relative risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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People Who Weigh Less Now Qualify for Gastric Device

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The Lap-Band gastric banding device has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people who are less obese than previous candidates, device maker Allergan said.

Lap-Band device

Gallstones Linked to Increased Risk of Death

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with ultrasound documented gallstone disease or evidence of cholecystectomy have increased mortality from all causes and increased mortality related to cardiovascular disease and cancer, according to a study published in the February issue of Gastroenterology.

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New U.S. Report on the Nation's Health 2010 Released

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics' 34th annual report, presenting the latest information on health status and determinants, utilization of health care, health care resources, expenditures, and a special feature on death and dying, was published Feb. 16.

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Steroids Up Risk of Bowel Perforation in Arthritis Patients

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients treated with glucocorticoids or with a history of diverticulitis have increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) perforation, according to a study in the February issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Blood-Borne Infection Risk Dropping Among Drug Users

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) declined from 1988 to 2008, while infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has decreased but is still significant, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Most Recalled Medical Devices Given Lenient Approval

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical devices recalled from 2005 to 2009 for risk of serious health hazard or death were approved by the less strict 510(k) process intended for devices considered low or moderate risk, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Researchers Explore Nature of Difficult Clinical Encounters

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Both patients and physicians can bring qualities to a clinical encounter that result in its being perceived as difficult, and patients involved in these types of encounters have worse short-term outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Undefined Liver Failure Linked to Acetaminophen

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with acute liver failure (ALF) from an uncertain cause have a relatively high prevalence of unrecognized acetaminophen toxicity, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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Enteric Sickness in Schools Often Has Foodborne Source

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Outbreaks of gastrointestinal illnesses among students frequently stem from a foodborne source and are mostly bacterial in nature; hand washing is often recommended to prevent outbreaks, according to a study published in the December issue of the Journal of School Health.

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Drugs Promising for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The results of two phase 3, randomized controlled trials suggest that two therapies, sunitinib and everolimus, hold promise in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors; the findings of these trials have been published in the Feb. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Public Sector Plays Big Role in Drug Research

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Public-sector research institutions (PSRIs) appear to play a bigger role in drug discovery than was previously thought, contributing to the discovery of about 10 to 20 percent of drugs approved for new drug applications since 1990, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Capsule Endoscopy Improves Crohn's Disease Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients without endoscopic or clinical suspicion of stenosis, capsule endoscopy (CE) demonstrates improved sensitivity for detection of Crohn's disease (CD) in the terminal ileum and superior diagnosis in the proximal small bowel, according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Nonalcoholic Liver Disease Rate Exceeds Past Estimates

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is higher than previously estimated, with Hispanics and those with diabetes at the highest risk, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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Cirrhosis Patients at Increased Risk of Extrahepatic Cancer

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with liver cirrhosis have more than double the risk of developing extrahepatic cancer than the general population, and they also have a significantly increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a study published in the February issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Hydrolyzed Wheat Flour Foods Safe for Celiac Disease Patients

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Baked goods made from hydrolyzed wheat flour and manufactured with sourdough lactobacilli and fungal proteases do not appear toxic to patients with celiac disease, according to a study published in the January issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation Tied to Pancreatitis Risk

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pancreatic-sufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) carrying genotypes associated with mild phenotypes appear to be at an increased risk of developing pancreatitis as compared to patients with the disease carrying genotypes associated with moderate-severe phenotypes, according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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HIV Does Not Impact Survival After Liver Transplant

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- HIV status does not impair the likelihood of survival after liver transplant for liver cancer, according to a study published in the February issue of Hepatology.

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Fidaxomicin Reduces C. difficile Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Fidaxomicin, a macrocyclic antibiotic, may offer greater protection than vancomycin against recurrence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection associated with non-North American Pulsed Field type 1 strains, and rates of clinical cure after fidaxomicin treatment are noninferior to those after vancomycin treatment, according to research published in the Feb. 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bone Mass, Bone Formation Reduced in Quiescent Crohn's

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Bone analysis reveals a reduction in bone mass characterized by trabecular thinning and bone loss caused by reduced bone formation in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease (CD), according to a study published in the January issue of Gastroenterology.

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