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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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February 2011 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: March 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for February 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Edarbi Approved for Treatment of Hypertension

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Edarbi (azilsartan medoxomil) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with hypertension.

high blood pressure

Less Cerebral Oxygenation Seen in Prone-Sleeping Infants

MONDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants experience decreased cerebral oxygenation while sleeping on their stomachs, which may give insight into the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome associated with prone sleeping, according to research published online Feb. 28 in Pediatrics.

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Raised Risk of Pulmonary Embolism in Specific Cancers

THURSDAY, Feb. 24 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) is significantly higher for outpatients with central nervous system (CNS), pancreatic, upper gastrointestinal, and lung/pleural malignancies, and lower for hematological and breast malignancies, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in Cancer.

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Brain Waves Used to Identify Autism Disorders in Infants

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new noninvasive test, using the standard electroencephalogram (EEG) to compute modified multiscale entropy (mMSE), may be a useful predictor of an infant's risk for autism, according to a study published online Feb. 22 in BMC Medicine.

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Cell Phone Use Increases Regional Brain Activity

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Acute cell phone use affects brain glucose metabolism in the area nearest to the phone's antenna, according to a study published in the Feb. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Office-Based Tests Identify Unsafe Drivers After Stroke

TUESDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Several office-based tests on road safety can be administered to post-stroke patients to identify those individuals at risk of failing an on-road evaluation, according to a review published in the February issue of Neurology.

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Multiple Concussions in Youth Tied to Various Issues

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- High school athletes with a history of multiple concussions appear to have more cognitive, physical, and sleep problems, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in Neurosurgery.

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Increasing Triglycerides Tied to Ischemic Stroke Risk

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing levels of nonfasting triglycerides are associated with an increasing risk of ischemic stroke in both men and women, and high cholesterol levels are associated with ischemic stroke risk in men only, according to research published online Feb. 18 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Low Pay for New Female Doctors Tied to Gender, Not Job

MONDAY, Feb. 21 (HealthDay News) -- In 2008, male physicians who were newly trained in New York State made an average of $16,819 more than newly trained female physicians, compared to a $3,600 difference in 1999, according to a study published in the February issue of Health Affairs.

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Different Therapies Improve Chronic Fatigue Outcomes

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For chronic fatigue patients, cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) may moderately improve outcomes when added to specialist medical care (SMC), according to research published online Feb. 18 in The Lancet.

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Exercise Improves Executive Function in Children

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is associated with improved executive function and mathematical achievement in children, according to a study published in the January issue of Health Psychology.

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Alcohol Intoxication Increases Sleep Disruption in Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol intoxication elevates subjective sleepiness and disrupts sleep objectively in women more than in men, regardless of family history of alcoholism, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Raised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Risk for Smokers

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with an increased risk for those who started smoking at a younger age, according to a study published in the February issue of Archives of Neurology.

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Analgesic Efficacy Altered by Patient Beliefs

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- An individual's expectation of a drug's effect influences both its therapeutic efficacy and the pain-related brain pathways that are activated during treatment, according to a study published in the Feb. 16 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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New U.S. Report on the Nation's Health 2010 Released

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics' 34th annual report, presenting the latest information on health status and determinants, utilization of health care, health care resources, expenditures, and a special feature on death and dying, was published Feb. 16.

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Dementia Risk Increases With Severity of Hearing Loss

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is independently associated with incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Most Recalled Medical Devices Given Lenient Approval

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical devices recalled from 2005 to 2009 for risk of serious health hazard or death were approved by the less strict 510(k) process intended for devices considered low or moderate risk, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Developmental Delays More Likely in Late Preterm Infants

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Late preterm infants are more likely than term infants to have mental or physical developmental delays and poorer neurodevelopmental outcomes, according to research published online Feb. 14 in Pediatrics.

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Abnormal Hand Control May Indicate ADHD Severity

TUESDAY, Feb. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Hand movement control measurements can be used in determining the severity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to two studies published in the Feb. 15 issue of Neurology.

Abstract - MacNeil
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Abstract - Gilbert
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Researchers Explore Nature of Difficult Clinical Encounters

MONDAY, Feb. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Both patients and physicians can bring qualities to a clinical encounter that result in its being perceived as difficult, and patients involved in these types of encounters have worse short-term outcomes, according to research published online Jan. 25 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Cerebrospinal Drainage Not Tied to Multiple Sclerosis

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- There does not appear to be a cause-effect relationship between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published in the January issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Antipsychotic Drugs May Reduce Brain Tissue Volume

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The use of antipsychotic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia appears to have a modest, but measurable influence on brain tissue loss over time, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Surgery for Migraines Has Long-Lasting Positive Impact

FRIDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term follow-up indicates that surgical manipulation of migraine trigger sites can reduce the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraines, according to a study published in the February issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Post-High School Adults With Autism Use Fewer Services

THURSDAY, Feb. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A large percentage of young adults with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not use services after leaving high school; service rates vary according to race and socio-economic status, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Drugs Promising for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The results of two phase 3, randomized controlled trials suggest that two therapies, sunitinib and everolimus, hold promise in the treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors; the findings of these trials have been published in the Feb. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Yao (subscription or payment may be required)
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Public Sector Plays Big Role in Drug Research

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Public-sector research institutions (PSRIs) appear to play a bigger role in drug discovery than was previously thought, contributing to the discovery of about 10 to 20 percent of drugs approved for new drug applications since 1990, according to research published in the Feb. 10 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Prenatal Myelomeningocele Surgery Improves Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal surgery for myelomeningocele decreases the need for shunting and improves motor outcomes at 30 months, though it is linked to an increased risk of preterm delivery and uterine dehiscence at delivery, according to a study published online Feb. 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Preterm Birth Linked to Impaired Memory

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who were born preterm have an increased risk of impaired executive function and memory, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Pediatrics.

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Black Box Warnings Linked to Reduced Antipsychotic Use

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of atypical antipsychotic drugs for neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia began to decline in 2003, and was temporally associated with the Food and Drug Administration black box advisory, according to a study published in the February issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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ADHD Often Linked to Other Mental Health Disorders

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely to have other mental health or neurodevelopmental conditions, and their social and educational functions worsen with more comorbidities, according to a study published online Feb. 7 in Pediatrics.

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More Sunlight May Reduce Risk of First Demyelination Events

TUESDAY, Feb. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sun exposure and vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels) may play independent roles in reducing the risk of first demyelinating events (FDE), according to a study in the Feb. 8 issue of Neurology.

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Metabolic Syndrome May Hasten Cognitive Decline

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its individual components appear to have a deleterious effect on cognitive function in older adults, according to research published online Feb. 2 in Neurology.

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Allergies May Protect Against Glioma

MONDAY, Feb. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Allergies may be protective against gliomas, with an inverse relationship between the number of allergies and the risk of developing a glioma, according to a study in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Impulse Control Disorders Exacerbate Parkinson's Disease

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) who suffer from impulse control disorder (ICD) are more likely to have psychiatric and cognitive impairment, which manifest as functional impairment, depression, anxiety, increased obsessionality, novelty-seeking, and impulsivity, according to a study published online Jan. 10 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Stroke-Related Mortality Lower for Blacks Than Whites

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Blacks have lower mortality rates than whites following acute ischemic stroke, and they are more likely to receive life-sustaining interventions, according to research published in the Feb. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Restricted Diet Can Identify Food-Induced ADHD

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary restriction may be a useful tool in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children, according to research published in the Feb. 5 issue of The Lancet.

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Rare Stroke Affects Pregnant and Postpartum Women

FRIDAY, Feb. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The American Heart Association (AHA) has compiled a series of evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT), and specifically for its management during pregnancy and postpartum, detailed in a statement published online Feb. 3 in Stroke.

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More Than 5 Percent of Elderly Have Cognitive Disorders

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- More than 5 percent of the 38.7 million U.S. individuals aged 65 years and older in 2007 reported having one or more cognitive disorders, according to a January statistical brief from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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Pediatric Stroke Survivors Have Lower Quality of Life

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in terms of overall well-being of pediatric stroke survivors is lower compared with healthy controls, according to a study published online Jan. 24 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Screening Test Feasible

THURSDAY, Feb. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A new blood-based assay can detect minute amounts of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) prions in human blood, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in The Lancet.

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Five New Parkinson's Disease Genetic Variants Identified

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Eleven genetic variants have been implicated in the risk of Parkinson's disease, including six previously identified variants and five newly discovered variants, according to research published online Feb. 2 in The Lancet.

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Maternal Stroke Associated With Heart Disease in Women

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Female patients who have acute coronary syndrome (ACS) are more likely to have a familial history of stroke in a female first-degree relative (FDR) than a male FDR, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

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Cause of Fever in Febrile Seizures Needs to Be Identified

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians evaluating infants or young children following a simple febrile seizure should focus on identifying the cause of the fever, according to new guidelines published in the February issue of Pediatrics.

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Long-Term Sequelae Affect Childhood Meningitis Survivors

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis may have long-term academic and behavioral limitations, and other long-term sequelae, according to a review published in the January issue of The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

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Exercise May Reduce Memory Loss in Older Adults

TUESDAY, Feb. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic conditioning may prevent hippocampus shrinking and memory loss in older adults, according to research published online Jan. 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Abstract
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