Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Gastroenterology | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pharmacy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Bulking Agent Injections Effective in Fecal Incontinence

Last Updated: March 18, 2011.

 

Dextranomer in stabilized hyaluronic acid injected into anal mucosa reduces fecal incontinence

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A transanal submucosal injection of dextranomer in stabilized hyaluronic acid is an effective treatment for fecal incontinence, according to a study published in the March 19 issue of The Lancet.

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- A transanal submucosal injection of dextranomer in stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) is an effective treatment for fecal incontinence, according to a study published in the March 19 issue of The Lancet.

Wilhelm Graf, Ph.D., from the Akademiska Sjukhuset in Uppsala, Sweden, and colleagues assessed the efficacy of transanal submucosal injections of NASHA Dx for the treatment of fecal incontinence. Of the 206 patients, aged 18 to 75 years, with fecal incontinence who were included in the study, 136 were randomly assigned to receive transanal submucosal injections of NASHA Dx and 70 received sham. The severity of fecal incontinence and quality of life were assessed at six months by clinical assessments and patient diaries. A 50 percent or greater reduction in the number of incontinence episodes was the primary end point of the study. Patients in the active treatment group were still being followed up at the time of publication.

The investigators found that 52 percent of patients who received NASHA Dx experienced a 50 percent or more reduction in the number of incontinence episodes compared to 31 percent of patients who received sham treatment (odds ratio, 2.36). A total of 128 treatment-related adverse events were recorded, including one rectal abscess and one prostatic abscess, both of which were serious.

"Submucosal injection of NASHA Dx provided a substantial improvement in incontinence symptoms when compared with baseline and with sham treatment," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with Q-Med AB, which funded the study.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: CDC: HIV Transmitted Through Living Kidney Donation Next: Stem Cells Linked to Functional Recovery of Heart Post MI

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.