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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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March 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: April 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for March 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Skeletal Immaturity Does Not Affect Broken Bones' Healing

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- People who break both the radius and ulna before reaching skeletal maturity heal just as well as those who are skeletally mature, and subjective measures of illness may be more predictive of degree of disability than objective measures of impairment, according to research published in the March 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Visual Stimuli Linked to Itching in Atopic Dermatitis

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic dermatitis patients report higher itch intensity and scratch more frequently upon watching itch videos, according to a study published online March 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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U.S. Birth Rate Declined 4 Percent from 2007 to 2009

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- After peaking at 4,316,233 births in 2007, the birth rate in the United States fell 4 percent by 2009, and a provisional count in 2010 indicates the number is continuing to decline, according to a March data brief released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Tetanus Cases Rare but Some Populations More Vulnerable

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Tetanus cases and fatalities in the United States have decreased by more than 95 percent and more than 99 percent, respectively, since the disease became reportable in 1947, but sporadic cases do still occur, and some populations are more at risk for contracting the potentially life-threatening disease, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Early Rehabilitation Post-Knee Arthroplasty Beneficial

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Starting rehabilitation within 24 hours of total knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis reduces the average hospital stay and the requisite number of sessions to achieve autonomy and normal gait and balance, according to a study published online March 7 in Clinical Rehabilitation.

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Race/Ethnicity Linked to Risk of Antenatal Depression

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Asian/Pacific Islander women are more likely to experience antenatal depression than non-Hispanic whites, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Heart Defect in Children Related to Migraine With Aura

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of patent foramen ovale (PFO), a common defect in the wall between the two upper chambers of the heart, is significantly greater in children who have migraines with aura, according to a study published online March 31 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Osteoarthritis Patients Show Increased Pain Sensitivity

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA) are more sensitive to experimental pain at multiple body sites compared to healthy controls, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Areas With More Surgeons Have Fewer Car Crash Deaths

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Areas with more surgeons available have fewer deaths from motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), according to a study published online March 29 in the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

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Suicide in Musculoskeletal Patients at Older Age

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide victims who have back pain or other musculoskeletal diseases (MSD) are older than those without MSD, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Growth Hormone Increases Adult Height in Turner's

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with growth hormone may result in greater adult height for girls with Turner's syndrome, and the addition of low-dose estrogen to the treatment regimen may further improve results, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Unmet Health Care Needs in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Double informant data indicate that a considerable percentage of adult survivors of childhood central nervous system tumors have long-term unmet health care needs (HCNs), according to a study published online March 8 in Cancer.

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Medical Abortion by Certified Nurses Safe and Effective

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Medical abortions by midlevel providers (MLPs), up to nine weeks gestation, are as safe and effective as those provided by doctors, according to a study published online March 31 in The Lancet.

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Exercise Plus Dieting Superior in Older Obese Individuals

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Dieting plus exercise may be better than either alone for improvement in physical function in older adults who are obese, according to research published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Negligence Litigation Against Nursing Homes Assessed

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- High-quality nursing homes are sued for negligence only marginally less than low-performing nursing homes, according to an article published in the March 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Two-Thirds of U.S. Residents Get Sufficient Vitamin D

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- About two-thirds of the U.S. population takes in sufficient amounts of vitamin D, but 8 percent may be at risk for vitamin D deficiency, according to a March data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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FDA: Store Pradaxa Only in Original Containers

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The anticoagulant dabigatran etexilate mesylate (Pradaxa), a direct thrombin inhibitor, should be dispensed and stored only in its original bottle or blister package because exposure to moisture may cause product breakdown and loss of potency, according to an alert issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Pacifier Use Does Not Affect Breast-Feeding Duration

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pacifier use in healthy, full-term newborns, introduced before or after breast-feeding is established, has little impact on the prevalence or duration of breast-feeding up to four months, according to a review published online in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Changes Seen in Incidence of ESRD From Lupus Nephritis

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- For children with lupus nephritis (LN)-associated end-stage renal disease (ESRD), disparities in treatment and mortality exist by several demographic characteristics; also, incidence rates have increased in younger patients and in African-Americans since 1995, according to two articles published online March 28 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Safflower Oil Improves Glycemia, Inflammation, Lipids

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Supplementation with safflower (SAF) oil improves glycemia, inflammation, and blood lipids compared to treatment with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in postmenopausal obese women, according to a study published online Jan. 12 in Clinical Nutrition.

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Online Health Records Less Used by Minorities, Poor

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Online personal health records (PHRs) are less frequently used by racial or ethnic minorities and patients with low annual income, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Discharge to Skilled Nursing Facilities Linked to Death

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with heart failure discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) have an increased risk for rehospitalization and death, according to a study published online March 29 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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High Number of 'Medalists' Free From Diabetes Complications

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- The relatively high proportion of patients with type 1 diabetes for 50 years or more without complications indicates the presence of protective factors, according to a study published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

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Insulin Delivery System Recalled by Roche

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- ACCU-CHEK FlexLink Plus infusion sets are being recalled by their manufacturer, Roche, because the tube used for inserting the set may become kinked or bent, which could result in the under-delivery or no delivery of insulin, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

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Inadequacies Identified in HIV Health Care Provision

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- The health system is inadequately prepared for the challenges of addressing the health needs of HIV-positive individuals, according to the report "HIV Screening and Access to Care," published online March 17 by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

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Air Pollution May Compromise Lung Transplant Patients

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Lung transplant patients who have high exposure to traffic-related air pollution may be at increased risk for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and death, according to research published online March 23 in Thorax.

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Four-Dose Rabies Prevention Vaccine Schedule Endorsed

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention committee has proposed a reduced schedule for prophylactic rabies vaccine, and the recommendations have been endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, according to a policy statement published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

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PSA Screening Predicted by Age, Life Expectancy

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Age and life expectancy are strong predictors of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening, which appears to be administered excessively to older men with limited life expectancy, according to research published online March 28 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Ethnicity Tied to Worry About Breast Cancer Recurrence

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Race and ethnicity have a significant impact on the amount women with breast cancer worry about recurrence, with less acculturated Latina women being especially susceptible to high levels of worry, according to a study published online March 28 in Cancer.

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Cannabis Use Tied to Poor Cognitive Function in MS

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis use among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated with negative impacts on cognitive function, according to a study published in the March 29 issue of Neurology.

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Radiation Risk From Airport Full-Body Scanners Limited

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Full-body scanners being deployed by the Transportation Security Administration in airports throughout the United States do not appear to increase risks related to radiation exposure, according to a special article published online March 28 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Conflicts of Interest Abound in Cardiology Guidelines

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Conflicts of interest (COIs) are prevalent in cardiology clinical practice guidelines, but there is still a substantial number of experienced expert guideline writers and reviewers without COIs, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Ambulatory BP Helps Identify Resistant Hypertension

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful prognosis tool to differentiate between true and white coat resistant hypertension, according to a study published online March 28 in Hypertension.

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Elevated Risk Factors Linked to Atrial Fibrillation

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- More than half the burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) results from having one or more elevated cardiovascular risk factors and is theoretically preventable, according to a study published online March 28 in Circulation.

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Bariatric Surgery Weight Loss Tied to Migraine Improvement

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Severely obese people who suffer from migraines experience improvement in their headaches after losing a significant amount of weight following bariatric surgery, according to a study published in the March 29 issue of Neurology.

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Decline Seen in Global Youth Mortality Over Last 50 Years

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall mortality declined substantially between 1955 and 2004 in children aged 14 years or younger and in females aged 15 to 24, but a smaller decline was evident for males aged 15 to 24 years, according to a study published online March 29 in The Lancet.

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Complementary Treatment of Colic Lacks Evidence

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence supporting the notion that complementary and alternative medicines may be useful for curing infantile colic is limited and of poor quality, according to a systematic review published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

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Guidelines Provided for Deep Vein Thrombosis Management

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Blood thinners should not be the only therapy considered for patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), according to a scientific statement published online March 21 in Circulation.

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Cardiac Risk Management Improves After Calcium Scan

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery calcium (CAC) scanning provides better risk factor control in coronary artery disease (CAD) without increasing downstream medical costs, according to a study published online March 23 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Citalopram, Finasteride Potentially Mislabeled

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of citalopram, an antidepressant, and finasteride, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, are being recalled by Greenstone LLC due to possible mislabeling of the bottles, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

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ADHD Linked to Greater Creative Achievement

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) attain more real-world creative achievement and have different creative styles compared to non-ADHD individuals, according to a study published in the April issue of Personality and Individual Differences.

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Almost Two-Thirds of Older Adults Have Hearing Loss

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two-thirds of older Americans experience hearing loss, and it is most strongly associated with age, gender, and race, according to a study published online Feb. 27 in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A.

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New Report Issued on Impact of Teen Social Media Use

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Using social media, such as Facebook and MySpace, is among the most common activities for children and adolescents today, and pediatricians are encouraged to help parents understand and address both the positive and negative effects, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics report published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

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Catechin-Caffeine and Caffeine Alone Increase Energy Use

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Catechin-caffeine mixtures -- such as those found in green tea -- and caffeine-only supplementation increase daily energy expenditure, but only catechin-caffeine mixtures significantly increase daily fat oxidation, according to a meta-analysis published online March 2 in Obesity Reviews.

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Bariatric Surgery Linked to Bone Density Loss in Teens

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who undergo bariatric surgery have reductions in bone mineral density (BMD), although the level is still within the age-appropriate norm, according to a study published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

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Poorer Health Outcomes for Elderly in Public Housing

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Elders residing in public housing have poor self-rated health status as well as increased prevalence of fatigue and comorbid conditions compared to those who live in the community, according to a study published in the Winter issue of Ethnicity & Disease.

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High Blood Pressure Tied to Rapid Gait Slowing in Elderly

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- High blood pressure in well-functioning older adults accelerates gait slowing over an extended period, even when hypertension is well controlled or develops later in life, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Mild Psychological Distress Associated With Disability

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Even mild psychological distress can result in long-term disability, according to a population-based study published online March 21 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Depression Tied to Worse Arthritic Knee Pain in Elderly

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who have minimal to moderate radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have an increased likelihood of having more severe symptoms if they have coexisting depression, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Surgeon Enthusiasm for Spinal Surgery Drives Rates

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical rates for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine (DDLS) are mainly affected by surgeon enthusiasm for surgery and not by disease prevalence or community resources, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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Use of Strategies to Reduce Risk of Opioid Misuse Is Low

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of opioid risk-reduction strategies by primary care physicians is limited, even among patients at particular risk of misuse, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Fracture Rates Slightly Higher in HIV Patients

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- People with HIV infection have a higher bone fracture rate compared to the general U.S. population, according to a study published online March 10 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Imatinib Improves Survival in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in complete cytogenetic remission (CCyR) for two years after starting imatinib have similar survival to that of the general population, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Heart Attack Risk Doubles After Transient Ischemic Attack

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The average annual incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) after transient ischemic attack (TIA) is approximately double that of the general population, according to a study published online 24 March in Stroke.

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U.S. Shingles Vaccine Approval Expanded

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- The Zostavax shingles vaccine is now approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for people aged 50 and older.

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Tuberculosis Rates in United States at All-Time Low

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of tuberculosis (TB) infection in the United States continues to decline, but the goal of elimination has not been met, and the infection disproportionately affects foreign-born individuals and ethnic minorities, according to a report published in the March 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Knee Replacement Improves Level of Physical Activity

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- People who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA) for osteoarthritis experience substantial improvements in the level of physical activity within the first year after surgery, but their activity level is not correlated with clinical outcome, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Menthol Cigarette Smokers Have Lower Cancer Rates

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Menthol and non-menthol cigarette smokers have similar quitting rates, but menthol smokers have lower lung cancer incidence and mortality, according to a study published online March 23 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Maternal Anemia Associated With Childhood Wheezing

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal anemia during pregnancy is linked with wheezing and asthma in early childhood, according to a study published in the February issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Safety Programs Boost Staff Perception of Safety Culture

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetrics patient safety programs can improve staff perceptions of safety and the safety culture, according to a study published in the March issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Thromboembolism May Recur With Residual Vein Obstruction

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with provoked or unprovoked deep vein thrombosis (DVT), residual vein obstruction (RVO) is associated with a slight increase in the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE) but does not seem to predict recurrent VTE in patients with unprovoked DVT following discontinuation of anticoagulation therapy, according to a meta-analysis published online March 7 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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High Alcohol Intake Not Tied to Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Higher alcohol consumption is associated with an increased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) but not with esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) or adjacent tumors of the esophagogastric junction (EGJA), according to research published online March 14 in Gut.

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Acne Impacts Adolescents' Quality of Life

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who suffer from acne are more likely to have a lower quality of life and psychological disorders, including anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation, according to research published in the January issue of the Dermatology Online Journal.

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Reduced Hours for Trainees Has Had Little Effect in U.S.

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing work hours for doctors in training to less than 80 per week has had little impact on patient outcomes or postgraduate training in the United States, according to a literature review published online March 22 in BMJ.

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Drug Reduces Rate of Conversion to Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Pioglitazone effectively reduces conversion to type 2 diabetes in people with impaired glucose tolerance, though it may also lead to weight gain and edema, according to research published in the March 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mercury Exposure and CVD Not Associated

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to mercury does not appear to increase the risk of stroke, coronary heart disease, or total cardiovascular disease, according to research published in the March 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Tiotropium Shows Edge Over Salmeterol for COPD

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Tiotropium, an anticholinergic drug, appears to be more effective than salmeterol in preventing exacerbations in patients with moderate or worse chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research published in the March 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Rheumatic Disease Patients Require Two Flu Vaccine Doses

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases require two doses of flu vaccine to achieve the same antibody response as one dose elicits in controls, which may be due in part to the influence of specific disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), according to a study published online March 7 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Shorter Closure Time for in Vitro Adult Platelet Transfusion

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Transfusion of adult platelets into neonatal blood results in shorter platelet function analyzer closure time compared with neonatal platelets, according to a study published online Feb. 14 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Qigong Comparable to Exercise for Treating Neck Pain

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic neck pain, Qigong is comparable to exercise therapy and superior to no treatment, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Spine.

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Bariatric Surgery in Youth Warrants Caution

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in older children may result in significant weight loss and improvement in quality of life, though long-term data on safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness are limited, according to a literature review published online March 3 in Clinical Obesity.

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Rapid Assessment Identifies Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- A novel two-hour accelerated diagnosis protocol (ADP) appears quite accurate in identifying patients with chest pains who are at low risk for a major adverse cardiac event and could probably be discharged early, according to research published online March 23 in The Lancet.

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Chronic Otitis Media Associated With Changes in Taste

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Children with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME) have different taste thresholds, which may be associated with their increased body mass index (BMI), according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Episodic Physical or Sexual Activity Linked to MI

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Episodic physical and sexual activity is associated with an increased risk of acute cardiac events, especially myocardial infarction (MI), although the risk is attenuated by increased habitual activity, according to a meta-analysis published in the March 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fibrate Use Rises in U.S. but Remains Stable in Canada

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Fibrate use has increased steadily in the United States but remains stable in Canada, according to a study published in the March 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Long-Term Weight Loss After Laparoscopic Gastric Banding

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the success of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) for morbid obesity in terms of long-term weight loss, follow-up suggests poor outcomes, according to a study published online March 21 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Increased Melanoma Incidence Tied to Socioeconomic Status

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- High socioeconomic status (SES) and exposure to ultraviolet-radiation (UV-R) are associated with increased malignant melanoma incidence among adolescent girls and young women, according to a study published online March 21 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Pelvic Asymmetry Identified in Cerebral Palsy Patients

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with cerebral palsy (CP) often exhibit transverse pelvic asymmetry, which is most prominent above the acetabulum and more frequent in patients with windswept hips, according to a study published online March 10 in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics.

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HIV Tropism Testing Guidelines Established

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- The European Consensus Group on the clinical management of tropism testing has established guidelines for tropism testing prior to the initiation of maraviroc therapy for HIV; the guidelines have been published online March 22 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Hearing Loss Diagnosed Earlier With Mandatory Screening

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Children born after the introduction of mandatory universal newborn hearing screenings (UNHS) have hearing loss diagnosed and cochlear implants at a younger age, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Multiple Sclerosis Slows After Stem Cell Transplant

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with active lesions who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved progression-free survival compared to patients without active lesions, according to a study published in the March 22 issue of Neurology.

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Atomoxetine of Limited Value in Young Children With ADHD

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For 5- and 6-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), atomoxetine is generally well tolerated and reduces core ADHD symptoms, but it fails to translate to overall clinical and functional improvement, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatrics.

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Family-Mediated Therapy Improves Outcome of Stroke

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- In addition to routine physical therapy, family-mediated exercise (FAME) therapy significantly improves patient recovery after an acute stroke, according to a study published in the March 1 issue of Stroke.

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Combination Therapy Given to Elderly Without Indications

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Combination therapy of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers is often prescribed without established indications, and is associated with an elevated risk of adverse renal outcomes compared to monotherapy, according to a study published online March 21 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Chronic Widespread Pain Not Linked to Physical Trauma

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Physically traumatic events are not associated with the development of chronic widespread pain (CWP), although being involved in a road accident may confer a modestly increased risk, according to a study published online March 21 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Oral Vaccine May Prevent Half of Cholera Episodes

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The currently available oral cholera vaccine may prevent 50 to 60 percent of cholera episodes in the first two years after vaccination, but its effectiveness is unlikely to last beyond three years, according to a review published in the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews.

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Taiwanese With Diabetes at Higher Risk of Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of prostate cancer among men in Taiwan is increasing, and men with diabetes are at an increased risk of prostate cancer, according to research published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

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Group B Strep Still Main Cause of Neonatal Meningitis

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Group B streptococci (GBS) is still the dominant cause of neonatal bacterial meningitis, whereas Escherichia coli (E. coli) is the most common cause among preterm infants, according to a study published in the March issue of The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal.

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Suppressive Therapy Manages Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Clopidogrel hypersensitivity, which affects up to 6 percent of patients, may be successfully managed using corticosteroids and antihistamines, without interrupting drug therapy, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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AAP Updates Recommendations on Car Seat Use

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- In a policy statement and technical report published online March 21 in Pediatrics, the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated their recommendations on best practices for the use of car seats and seat belts for children from birth through adolescence.

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Majority of Parents Approve of Smoke Exposure Testing

MONDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents, both smokers and nonsmokers, want their children tested for tobacco-smoke exposure as part of their children's health care settings, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatrics.

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Neck Disability Index Estimates SF-6D Utility Scores

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with cervical degenerative disorders, Short Form-6D (SF-6D) utilities can be estimated using a Neck Disability Index (NDI) regression model, according to a study published online March 15 in Spine.

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Mental Health Negatively Affected by Poor-Quality Jobs

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Gaining employment improves mental health only for jobs of good psychosocial quality; whereas, jobs with poor psychosocial quality may detrimentally affect mental health, according to a study published online March 14 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Diabetes Drug Linked to Increased Cardiovascular Risk

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes who take rosiglitazone are at greater risk of congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction (MI), and death, compared to those who take pioglitazone, according to a meta-analysis published online March 17 in BMJ.

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Once-Daily Sildenafil Reduces Raynaud's Attack Frequency

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Modified-release sildenafil reduces frequency of attacks in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) secondary to limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (lcSSc), and is generally well tolerated, according to a study published in the March issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Artesunate Provides Superior Treatment for Severe Malaria

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of severe malaria with artesunate is superior to quinine for both adults and children, according to a review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Inflammatory Marker Tied to Colorectal Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Higher plasma levels of the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR-2) appear to be associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) among women, with anti-inflammatory drugs reducing the risk of CRC among women with high baseline sTNFR-2 levels, according to a study publis

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