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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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March 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: April 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for March 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Visual Stimuli Linked to Itching in Atopic Dermatitis

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Atopic dermatitis patients report higher itch intensity and scratch more frequently upon watching itch videos, according to a study published online March 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Race/Ethnicity Linked to Risk of Antenatal Depression

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Black and Asian/Pacific Islander women are more likely to experience antenatal depression than non-Hispanic whites, according to a study published online Jan. 31 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Suicide in Musculoskeletal Patients at Older Age

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Suicide victims who have back pain or other musculoskeletal diseases (MSD) are older than those without MSD, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Unmet Health Care Needs in Survivors of Childhood Cancer

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Double informant data indicate that a considerable percentage of adult survivors of childhood central nervous system tumors have long-term unmet health care needs (HCNs), according to a study published online March 8 in Cancer.

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Impact of Social Anxiety Therapy Seen in Brain Waves

THURSDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Psychotherapy is associated with improved neural functioning in socially anxious adults, according to a study published online March 4 in Psychological Science.

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Online Health Records Less Used by Minorities, Poor

WEDNESDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Online personal health records (PHRs) are less frequently used by racial or ethnic minorities and patients with low annual income, according to a study published in the March 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Ethnicity Tied to Worry About Breast Cancer Recurrence

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Race and ethnicity have a significant impact on the amount women with breast cancer worry about recurrence, with less acculturated Latina women being especially susceptible to high levels of worry, according to a study published online March 28 in Cancer.

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Cannabis Use Tied to Poor Cognitive Function in MS

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis use among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is associated with negative impacts on cognitive function, according to a study published in the March 29 issue of Neurology.

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Decline Seen in Global Youth Mortality Over Last 50 Years

TUESDAY, March 29 (HealthDay News) -- Overall mortality declined substantially between 1955 and 2004 in children aged 14 years or younger and in females aged 15 to 24, but a smaller decline was evident for males aged 15 to 24 years, according to a study published online March 29 in The Lancet.

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Citalopram, Finasteride Potentially Mislabeled

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of citalopram, an antidepressant, and finasteride, used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, are being recalled by Greenstone LLC due to possible mislabeling of the bottles, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced.

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ADHD Linked to Greater Creative Achievement

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) attain more real-world creative achievement and have different creative styles compared to non-ADHD individuals, according to a study published in the April issue of Personality and Individual Differences.

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New Report Issued on Impact of Teen Social Media Use

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Using social media, such as Facebook and MySpace, is among the most common activities for children and adolescents today, and pediatricians are encouraged to help parents understand and address both the positive and negative effects, according to an American Academy of Pediatrics report published online March 28 in Pediatrics.

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Poorer Health Outcomes for Elderly in Public Housing

MONDAY, March 28 (HealthDay News) -- Elders residing in public housing have poor self-rated health status as well as increased prevalence of fatigue and comorbid conditions compared to those who live in the community, according to a study published in the Winter issue of Ethnicity & Disease.

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Mild Psychological Distress Associated With Disability

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Even mild psychological distress can result in long-term disability, according to a population-based study published online March 21 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Depression Tied to Worse Arthritic Knee Pain in Elderly

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who have minimal to moderate radiographic evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) have an increased likelihood of having more severe symptoms if they have coexisting depression, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Use of Strategies to Reduce Risk of Opioid Misuse Is Low

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of opioid risk-reduction strategies by primary care physicians is limited, even among patients at particular risk of misuse, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Libido Unaffected by Endocrine Therapy in Breast Cancer

FRIDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual desire in patients with breast cancer is not affected by adjuvant endocrine therapy, but is significantly reduced in those women with chemotherapy- or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist-induced menopause, according to a study published online March 2 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Acne Impacts Adolescents' Quality of Life

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who suffer from acne are more likely to have a lower quality of life and psychological disorders, including anxiety, depression, and suicide ideation, according to research published in the January issue of the Dermatology Online Journal.

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Reduced Hours for Trainees Has Had Little Effect in U.S.

THURSDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Reducing work hours for doctors in training to less than 80 per week has had little impact on patient outcomes or postgraduate training in the United States, according to a literature review published online March 22 in BMJ.

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Bariatric Surgery in Youth Warrants Caution

WEDNESDAY, March 23 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery in older children may result in significant weight loss and improvement in quality of life, though long-term data on safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness are limited, according to a literature review published online March 3 in Clinical Obesity.

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Atomoxetine of Limited Value in Young Children With ADHD

TUESDAY, March 22 (HealthDay News) -- For 5- and 6-year-old children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), atomoxetine is generally well tolerated and reduces core ADHD symptoms, but it fails to translate to overall clinical and functional improvement, according to a study published online March 21 in Pediatrics.

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Mental Health Negatively Affected by Poor-Quality Jobs

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Gaining employment improves mental health only for jobs of good psychosocial quality; whereas, jobs with poor psychosocial quality may detrimentally affect mental health, according to a study published online March 14 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Premenstrual Mood Swings May Worsen Bipolar Disorder

FRIDAY, March 18 (HealthDay News) -- Women with bipolar disorder who experience premenstrual exacerbation of their symptoms are more likely to have a worse course of illness, a shorter time to relapse, and more severe symptoms, according to a study published online Feb. 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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5α-Reductase Inhibitors Tied to Adverse Male Sexual Health

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- 5α-reductase inhibitors (5α-RIs), used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and hair loss in men, may cause persistent erectile dysfunction, depression, and loss of libido, even after discontinuing the medication, according to a review published in the March issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Professional Values of U.S. and U.K. Doctors Examined

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- A core of professional values exists among doctors in the United States and the United Kingdom, though significant differences exist in how these values are expressed and prioritized, according to a study published online March 7 in BMJ Quality & Safety.

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Depression in Blacks Varies With Socioeconomic Status

THURSDAY, March 17 (HealthDay News) -- African-American men at both extremes of the socioeconomic spectrum are more likely to suffer from a major depressive episode (MDE); whereas African-American women with the lowest incomes are at greater risk of MDE, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

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Short Nurse Staffing Linked to Higher Patient Mortality

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patient mortality appears to be higher when nurse staffing falls eight or more hours below target level and during nursing shifts when patient turnover is high, according to research published in the March 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Death Rate Reaches All-Time Low

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- The age-adjusted death rate for the United States has fallen for 10 straight years and has reached an all-time low of 741 per 100,000, or 2,436,682 deaths, in 2009, down 2.3 percent from 2008, according to a new report issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Alzheimer's Disease Preceded by Cognitive Decline

WEDNESDAY, March 16 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease is preceded by five or six years of rapid cognitive decline in multiple functions, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Heavy Smoking Prevalence Decline Greatest in California

TUESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- Between 1965 and 2007, the prevalence of high-intensity smoking declined in California and in the remaining states, according to a study published in the March 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Post-Stroke Depression Severity Increases Dependency

TUESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- People who suffer from depression after a stroke are more likely to be dependent if they have more comorbidities, had a more severe stroke, or had increased baseline depression severity, according to a study published in the March 15 issue of Neurology.

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Fathers' Negative Parenting Behavior Linked to Depression

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Depressed fathers are less likely to demonstrate positive parental behavior toward their 1-year-old children, and more likely to display negative parenting behavior, according to a study published online March 14 in Pediatrics.

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Drug-Related Poisonings Highest in Young Children

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency department visits for unintentional drug-related poisonings in the United States are highest among children age 0 to 5 and more prominent in rural areas, and young women have the highest rate of drug-related poisonings with suicidal intent, according to research published online March 3 in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

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Daytime Sleep Offers Cardiovascular Benefits

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Daytime sleep may have cardiovascular benefits, including accelerated cardiovascular recovery from psychological stress, according to research published online Feb. 26 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Menopausal Symptoms Improve After Acupuncture Treatment

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture may be an effective alternative therapy for reducing menopausal complaints, especially the severity of hot flushes, according to a study published in the March issue of Acupuncture in Medicine.

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Depression Linked to Adverse Renal Disease Outcomes

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Symptoms of depression are associated with subsequent adverse outcomes in patients with renal disease, according to a study published online March 10 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Depression Care in Hospital May Improve Cardiac Outcomes

THURSDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with depression and cardiac illness, managing depression during hospitalization improves mental health outcomes and may also improve medical outcomes after intervention, according to a study published online March 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Ethnic Differences Seen in Academic Measures for U.K. Docs

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- United Kingdom-trained physicians and medical students with ethnic minority backgrounds tend to underperform academically compared to their white peers, according to a meta-analysis published online March 8 in BMJ.

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Most Youth With Chronic Illness Finish High School

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Most young adults growing up with a chronic illness graduate high school and have employment, but those with chronic illnesses other than asthma have worse educational and vocational outcomes, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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International Similarities Reported in Bipolar Disorders

WEDNESDAY, March 9 (HealthDay News) -- Severity, impact, and comorbidity patterns of bipolar spectrum disorders (BPS) are similar internationally, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Pharmacological Meta-Analyses Rarely Report Disclosures

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Meta-analyses of pharmacological treatments rarely include information addressing primary study funding and conflicts of interest (COIs) of the authors for the included randomized control trials (RCTs), according to a study published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Link Found Between Cognitive Function, Neighborhood

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Growing old in a psychosocially hazardous neighborhood may have a diminishing effect on cognitive functioning in people with the ε4 variant of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene, according to research published in the March issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Cereal Tastes Better When Box Features Cartoon Characters

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Cereal tastes better to children when its packaging features recognizable media characters, according to a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Higher Than Expected Eating Disorders Prevalence in Teens

TUESDAY, March 8 (HealthDay News) -- Eating disorders and subthreshold eating conditions are prevalent in the general adolescent population and are associated with other psychiatric disorders, role impairment, and suicidality, according to a study published online March 7 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Corrective Lumbar Fusion Offers Modest Improvement

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing lumbar fusion to revise a prior surgery have modest health-related quality of life improvements, according to a study published in the Feb. 15 issue of Spine.

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Abuser's Gender Affects Head Trauma Outcome in Youth

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- Male perpetrators of abusive head trauma in children are more likely to confess and be convicted, and their victims are more likely to have more serious presentations and worse outcomes, according to a study published online March 7 in Pediatrics.

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Widespread Communication Technology Use Before Sleep

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is widespread use of communication devices, especially laptops and cell phones, in the hour before going to bed, according to the 2011 Sleep in America® Poll released by the National Sleep Foundation.

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Majority of Locked-In Syndrome Patients Happy

MONDAY, March 7 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of self-assessed patients with locked-in syndrome (LIS) say they are happy, according to a study published online Feb. 23 in BMJ Open.

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Growing Up With Illness Impairs Education and Income

FRIDAY, March 4 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults who grow up with chronic illness may succeed socially, but are more likely to have inferior educational and economic outcomes, according to a study published online Feb. 4 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Depression Tied to Lower Priority of Care in Heart Attack

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Heart attack patients with a documented history of depression in their charts may be triaged to lower priority of care than patients with no documented history of depression, and they are more likely to have worse associated performance on quality indicators, according to research published online Feb. 28 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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CDC: More Than One-Third of Americans Lack Sleep

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-third of Americans do not get adequate sleep on a daily basis, which affects activities of daily living -- particularly resulting in an inability to concentrate on actions, according to two reports in the March 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Sexual Behavior in U.S. Adults Little Changed Since 2002

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Most adults in the United States have experienced vaginal sex, but the number of younger adults reporting no sexual contact has increased since 2002, according to the March issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Health Statistics Report.

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Injectable Risperidone No Better Than Oral Antipsychotics

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with oral antipsychotics, long-acting injectable risperidone does not appear to improve outcomes in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and it is associated with more injection site and extrapyramidal adverse effects, according to the results of a long-term trial published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Proxy Decision Makers May Have Lasting Emotional Burden

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Surrogates who make treatment decisions for incapacitated adults often suffer a negative emotional effect that may last months, or sometimes even years, according to a literature review published in the March 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Cannabis Use in Youth Ups Incident Psychosis Risk

THURSDAY, March 3 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis use among youth is associated with an increased risk of later incident psychotic symptoms, with continued cannabis use increasing the risk for persistent psychotic symptoms, according to a study published online March 1 in BMJ.

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Role of Diabetes in Premature Death Is Substantial

WEDNESDAY, March 2 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes is substantially associated with premature mortality from cancers, infectious diseases, external causes, intentional self-harm, and degenerative disorders, according to research published in the March 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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