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Category: Oncology | Monthly Briefing

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April 2011 Briefing - Hematology & Oncology

Last Updated: May 02, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Hematology & Oncology for April 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Zytiga Approved for Advanced Prostate Cancer

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Zytiga (abiraterone acetate), used in combination with prednisone, has been approved to treat advanced prostate cancer, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in statement.

National Cancer Institute

Bleeding Score Improves Mild Bleeding Disorder Diagnosis

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Use of bleeding assessment tools (BATs) improves the evaluation of patients with suspected mild bleeding disorders (MBD), according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
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Increasing Cancer Burden Projected for Ethnic Minorities

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Consideration of genetic, ethnic, biologic, and sociological factors is necessary to appropriately diagnose and treat cancer in all U.S. subpopulations, according to the President's Cancer Panel 2009 to 2010 report published April 28.

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Wegener's Granulomatosis Tied to Higher Solid Tumor Risk

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- The increased risk of solid malignancies seen in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis treated with etanercept during the Wegener's Granulomatosis Etanercept Trial (WGET) remained increased during long-term post-trial follow-up, according to a study published online April 11 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Strategy Found Effective for Women With Cervical Neoplasia

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a history of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN grade 2 or 3) who have had three consecutive negative cytological smears are at a similar five-year risk of developing cervical cancer or recurrent disease as women in the general population, according to a study published online April 28 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Acute Neurological Toxicity Tied to Overall Survival

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Acute neurological toxicities (NTs) are significantly associated with late NT and overall survival in patients with high-grade gliomas treated with surgery and chemoradiation, according to a study published online April 12 in the British Journal of Cancer.

Abstract
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Monthly Injection Effective for Opioid Dependence

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- A once-monthly injection of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of opioid dependence after detoxification, according to a study published online April 28 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Dose Aspirin Affects Post-Surgery Blood Drainage

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking low-dose aspirin have significantly increased blood drainage and are at increased risk of complications after spinal surgery, even if they stop taking aspirin seven days before surgery, according to a study published in the April issue of The Spine Journal.

Abstract
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Oophorectomy May Not Adversely Affect Health

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Elective bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) with hysterectomy is associated with a lower risk of ovarian cancer than ovarian conservation and hysterectomy, and BSO does not appear to have adverse effects on cardiovascular health, hip fracture, cancer, or total mortality compared with ovarian conservation and hysterectomy, according to research published in the April 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Activated CTNNB1 Linked to Survival in Obese CRC Patients

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Cadherin-associated protein β 1 (CTNNB1) activation is associated with improved colorectal cancer-specific and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m² or more, according to a study published online April 27 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Black Cancer Patients More Willing to Pay to Extend Life

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Black cancer patients are more willing to expend their personal financial resources in order to extend life compared to white cancer patients, according to a study published online April 26 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Preoperative Definition of Basal Cell Cancer Margins Feasible

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of topical methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) as a photosensitizer in conjunction with Wood lamp examination is a feasible method for identifying tumor margins in patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) prior to Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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AAP: Chemical Management Policy Needs Revision

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stating that the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 has failed to protect children, pregnant women, and others from marketplace exposure to harmful chemicals, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends current U.S. chemical management policy be revised, according to a policy report published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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P. falciparum Infection May Confer Long-Term Protection

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Artificially induced immunity against infection with Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) may last for 2.5 years or longer, according to a study published online April 25 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Risk Taking Similar in Very Obese, Normal Weight Teens

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- High school students (HSS) with extreme obesity appear to engage in risky behaviors at a rate similar to that of their healthy weight peers, with higher rates of some high-risk behaviors, according to research published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Smoking Cessation May Prevent Cancer in Liver Recipients

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant recipients who quit smoking after transplantation have a lower incidence of smoking-related malignancies (SRMs) compared with patients who continue smoking, according to a study published in the April issue of Liver Transplantation.

Abstract
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Hypertension Drugs Tied to Risk of Cancer Recurrence

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) appear to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer recurrence in women, while beta blockers (BBs) seem to have a protective effect, according to a study published online April 11 in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.

Abstract
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CDC: Half of States Have Smoke-Free Policies

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive smoke-free policies among U.S. states increased dramatically between 2000 and 2010, making the Healthy People 2020 target of all states having comprehensive smoke-free policies achievable with continued efforts and accelerated efforts in the Southern states, according a report in the April 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pioglitazone Not Tied to Most Cancers in Diabetes Patients

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pioglitazone does not appear to be associated with common cancers in people with diabetes, though there may be an increased risk for bladder cancer in those who have received more than two years' treatment with the agent, according to two articles published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract - Ferrara
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Abstract - Lewis
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Researchers Review Risks Tied to Nuclear Accidents

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- In a new article, researchers review the short- and long-term health risks associated with nuclear power plant accidents in light of the recent earthquake in Japan that caused substantial damage to a nuclear plant. The article has been published online April 20 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Hemoglobin Sensor May Help in Transfusion Decisions

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a continuous spectrophotometric hemoglobin (SpHb) sensor may be a useful new approach for noninvasive blood hemoglobin monitoring during surgery, according to a study published in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Uremic Patients Risk Spinal Surgery Complications

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Uremic patients undergoing posterior instrumented lumbar spinal surgery have similar solid fusion rates, but are at increased risk of complications compared to controls, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Physical Activity Guidelines May Improve Survival

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Meeting the recommendations set out in the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is associated with reduced all-cause mortality in U.S. adults, according to a study published online April 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Low-Cost Thromboprophylaxis by Electronic Alerts Effective

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic alert (e-alert) systems are cost-effective tools for reducing venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, according to a study published online April 11 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
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Off-Label Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa High

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Off-label use of recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in the hospital setting greatly exceeds use for approved indications; off-label use does not appear to reduce mortality and may increase the risk for thromboembolism, according to research published in the April 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Logan
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Abstract - Yank
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Whole-Genome Sequencing Identifies Cancer Mutations

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Whole-genome sequencing appears to be effective in identifying cryptic mutations in cancer susceptibility genes, according to two studies published in the April 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Link
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Abstract - Welch
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Non-Inferior Efficacy for Subcutaneous Bortezomib

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Subcutaneous bortezomib has non-inferior efficacy and better safety than standard intravenous administration for patients with relapsed multiple myeloma, according to a study published online April 19 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Post-Laser Ablation Basal Cell Carcinoma Diagnosed Later

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) developing post-laser ablations have a longer disease interval to diagnosis and a more aggressive disease pattern compared to those with primary BCC, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Post-Cancer Fatigue Linked to Autonomic Nervous System

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term fatigue that affects breast cancer survivors may be caused by higher sympathetic and lower parasympathetic activity, according to a study published online March 9 in Psychoneuroendocrinology.

Abstract
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Effective Method to Prevent Diabetic Foot Ulcers Lacking

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most of the interventions used to prevent diabetic foot ulcers in insensate feet do not show any evidence of benefit, according to a review published in the April issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Biomarkers May Predict Metastasis Risk in Melanoma

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- A set of plasma biomarkers in people with melanoma may be useful in predicting which patients are at risk for metastasis, according to research published in the April 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Geneva Score Prognostic in Patients Ruled Out for PE

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Assessment of clinical probability with a revised Geneva score (RGS) could help predict prognosis in patients for whom pulmonary embolism (PE) has been ruled out, according to research published in the April issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Colorectal Cancer Mortality Varies Between Hospitals

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty-day postoperative mortality following major colorectal cancer surgery varies significantly between hospitals, according to a study published online April 12 in Gut.

Abstract
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Penile Implant Use Low After Prostate Cancer Treatment

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- The utilization of penile implants is low in men who have had prostate cancer treatments, including radical prostatectomy (RP) or radiotherapy (RT), but is more likely in those who have had RP than RT, according to a study published online March 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Hookah Use Widespread Among College Students

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking waterpipe tobacco, or hookah, is an increasingly popular activity among U.S. college students, and tends to be falsely perceived as being safer than cigarette smoking, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

Abstract
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Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Confuse Women

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- The new recommendations on breast cancer screening released by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force confuse women more than they help them understand when to get a mammogram, according to a study published online April 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Epilepsy May Increase the Risk of Cerebral Tumors

WEDNESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals who have new-onset epilepsy have an increased risk for developing cerebral tumors, according to a study published online March 28 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Non-AIDS-Defining Cancers Increase Among HIV Patients

WEDNESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- In the last 15 years, there has been a large increase in the number of non-AIDS-defining cancers among HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published online April 11 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Bone Marrow Recipients Develop PML Symptoms Earlier

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Bone marrow recipients have a shorter average time to development of the first symptoms of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), but they may survive longer than solid organ recipients post symptom onset, according to a study published online March 7 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
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SLN Biopsy Predicts Lymph Node Status in Endometrial CA

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy appears promising as a less invasive alternative to complete lymphadenectomy for diagnosing lymph node status in patients with early-stage endometrial cancer, according to research published online April 12 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Neurocognitive Impairment Up in Childhood Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer may be at risk of neurocognitive impairment associated with fatigue and sleep disorders, according to a study published online April 11 in Cancer.

Abstract
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First U.S. Test to Diagnose Dengue Fever Approved

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- The first test to help diagnose people with symptoms of the mosquito-borne virus dengue fever has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

dengue fever

Lenalidomide May Up Risk of Developing New Cancers

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care providers that lenalidomide (Revlimid) appears to be associated with an increased risk of developing new types of cancer.

More Information

Smoking After Cancer Diagnosis Worsens Quality of Life

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Caregiver mental quality of life (QoL) is worse in lung and colorectal patient-caregiver dyads in which one member of the dyad smokes, according to a study published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Bipolar Sealer Not Preferable to Electrocautery in Arthroplasty

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a bipolar sealer to achieve hemostasis during uncomplicated primary total hip arthroplasty does not appear to have any advantages over standard electrocautery, according to research published in the March 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Erectile Dysfunction Tied to Cardiovascular Death Risk

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of mortality due to cardiovascular causes increases in men with erectile dysfunction (ED); however, in the first five years after ED manifestation, there is a higher proportion of deaths due to oncological causes, according to a study published online March 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Tied to Higher CRC Risk

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) undergoing screening colonoscopy have more early or precursor colorectal carcinoma (CRC) lesions compared to subjects without NAFLD, according to a study published online March 17 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Modified Chemo Effective for Lymphoma in Elderly

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- A standard dose of rituximab combined with a low dose of CHOP (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone) chemotherapy (R-miniCHOP) in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma offers good efficacy with acceptable levels of toxicity, according to a study published online April 8 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Alcohol Consumption Linked to Higher Cancer Incidence

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of cancer cases in both men and women can be attributed to alcohol consumption, according to a study published online April 7 in the BMJ.

Abstract
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'Global Trigger Tool' Identifies 10 Times More Errors

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the new Global Trigger Tool, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, detects at least 10 times more adverse events than other methods currently in use, according to a study published in the April issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract
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Vandetanib Approved for a Rare Thyroid Cancer

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Vandetanib has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as the first drug to treat a rare form of thyroid cancer in its latter stages.

medullary thyroid cancer

Self-Management of Anticoagulant Therapy Effective

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Patient self-testing (PST), alone or in combination with patient self-management (PSM) of anticoagulant doses, reduces thromboembolic complications and all-cause mortality without increasing major bleeding events, according to a meta-analysis published in the April 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Yellow Fever Vaccine Safe and Effective

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- A new vaccine against yellow fever that contains inactivated yellow fever antigen shows promise as a safe alternative to live vaccine, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Non-Communicable Diseases Present a Global Health Crisis

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- The global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing, and a global movement is needed to tackle them, according to a report published online April 6 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Maximum Daily Opioid Doses Increase Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prescribed higher daily opioid doses for pain are at increased risk of opioid overdose death, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Alteration in Health Outcomes Post Estrogen Therapy

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among postmenopausal women with prior hysterectomy, cessation of conjugated equine estrogen (CEE) therapy reduces the risk of stroke, and the risk of breast cancer remains reduced, according to a study to be published on April 6 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Optical Coherence Tomography Identifies Cervical Cancer

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Optical coherence tomography (OCT), a new imaging technology that allows noninvasive cross-sectional imaging, has high sensitivity for diagnosing cervical cancer, but low specificity, according to a study published in the March issue of Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
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More Screening Lowers False-Positive Mammography Rate

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. radiologists with higher annual screening volumes and focus have statistically significant lower false-positive rates and cancer detection rates during mammography, according to a study published in the April issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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Breast Cancer Survival Factors for Underserved Identified

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Advanced stages at presentation, and limited diagnostic and treatment capabilities, contribute to lower breast cancer survival in low-income and middle-income countries (LMC), according to the executive summary of the Breast Health Global Initiative Consensus 2010, published in the April issue of The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Prostate Cancer Screening May Not Reduce Mortality

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for prostate cancer may not reduce prostate cancer-specific mortality, according to research published online March 31 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Low Nutrients Tied to Anemia Risk in Postmenopausal Women

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Inadequate nutrient intake is associated with greater risk for anemia in postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cancer Rates, Cancer Mortality Rates Falling in U.S.

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Newly diagnosed cancer rates and cancer-related mortality rates in the United States are steadily declining, according to the "Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer," published online March 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Autoimmune Diseases Number Two Cause of Chronic Illness

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune diseases are the second leading cause of chronic illness in the United States and constitute a major direct and indirect economic burden to the U.S. health care system, according to a report released by the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) on March 22 at a congressional briefing.

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New Tool Diagnoses Prostate Cancer From Nontumor Tissue

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- A stroma-specific classifier constructed on the basis of potential stroma-specific genes can detect a nearby prostate tumor from genetic expression profiles from tumor-free samples, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Cancer Research.

Abstract
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MRI Found to Improve Breast Cancer Detection Rate

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Using a combination of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and mammography increases sensitivity of cancer detection in women with a history of chest irradiation compared to using either modality on its own, according to a study published in the April issue of Radiology.

Abstract
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