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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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April 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: May 02, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for April 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Large-Scale Autism Screening at 1 Year of Age Feasible

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Screening implemented at infants' 12-month check-ups may be able to identify autism and other developmental disorders, which can help researchers learn more about these disorders in their earliest manifestations, according to research published online April 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Children of Depressed Parents Experience More Stress

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Young children respond to stressful situations with higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol when their parents have a history of depression and exhibit negative behavior toward them, according to a study published online April 1 in Psychological Science.

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Obese White Teens May Have Increased Risk of Depression

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Non-Hispanic obese white adolescents may have an increased risk of high-depressive symptoms, according to a study published online March 14 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Increasing Cancer Burden Projected for Ethnic Minorities

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Consideration of genetic, ethnic, biologic, and sociological factors is necessary to appropriately diagnose and treat cancer in all U.S. subpopulations, according to the President's Cancer Panel 2009 to 2010 report published April 28.

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Autism Treatment Program May Help Toddler Subset

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- An autism treatment approach, Hanen's "More Than Words" (HMTW), appears to improve communication skills in a subset of children younger than 2 years showing early signs of an autism spectrum disorder, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Obesity in Pregnancy Linked to Fetal and Infant Death

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Early pregnancy obesity significantly increases the risk of fetal and infant death, independent of risks associated with congenital anomalies and maternal pre-gestational diabetes, according to a study published online April 5 in Human Reproduction.

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Researchers Explore Genetic Basis for BCG Disease

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic mutations affecting interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) may thwart the development of monocytes and dendritic cells and impair antimycobacterial immunity, according to research published online April 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Regulatory Problems in Infancy Tied to Behavioral Issues

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with previous regulatory problems during infancy may have an increased risk of behavioral problems compared to controls, according to a meta-analysis published online April 20 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Preoperative MRI Doesn't Affect Scoliosis Surgery Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis may not affect the surgical outcome even if a neural abnormality is detected, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of Spine.

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Vitamin E and Metformin Don't Improve Pediatric NAFLD

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), neither treatment with vitamin E nor metformin significantly reduces alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels compared to placebo, according to a study published in the April 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Epilepsy Drug Nonadherence Tied to Socioeconomic Status

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to antiepileptic drug therapy in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy varies greatly between children, and is significantly correlated with socioeconomic status, according to a study published in the April 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AAP Recommends Electronic Infrastructure in Medical Home

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a comprehensive electronic infrastructure will centralize and support the relationship between pediatric patients and their health care providers through advanced health information management, according to a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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AAP: Chemical Management Policy Needs Revision

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stating that the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 has failed to protect children, pregnant women, and others from marketplace exposure to harmful chemicals, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends current U.S. chemical management policy be revised, according to a policy report published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Persistent Poverty Undermines Cognitive Function at Age 5

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent poverty at a very early age is an independent risk factor that can undermine a child's cognitive development at age 5, according to a study published online April 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Approval for Meningitis Vaccine Expanded to Include Toddlers

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the Menactra vaccine has been expanded by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent meningitis and other forms of meningococcal disease in children as young as 9 months, the agency said in a news release.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Risk Taking Similar in Very Obese, Normal Weight Teens

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- High school students (HSS) with extreme obesity appear to engage in risky behaviors at a rate similar to that of their healthy weight peers, with higher rates of some high-risk behaviors, according to research published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Policy Statement Addresses Chaperones in Pediatric Exams

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patient comfort, privacy, and confidentiality are matters to consider when it comes to the presence of chaperones during physical examinations of pediatric patients, according to a policy statement published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Autism Diagnosis Marginally Affected by Income

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- As the prevalence rate of autism slowed, socioeconomic status (SES) seems to have become less of an impact on the likelihood of diagnosis than during times of increasing prevalence, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Sociological Review.

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Raised Death Risk With Low and High Glycated Hemoglobin

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- The relationship between glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and mortality or complications suggests setting a target A1C level higher than 6 percent, and lower than 8 percent in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online April 19 in Diabetes Care.

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Brief, Intense Exercise May Have Cardioprotective Role

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Brief, intense exercise is a time-efficient alternative to traditional endurance training and reduces the level of various markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in adolescents, according to a study published online April 4 in the American Journal of Human Biology.

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Disc Degeneration More Prevalent in Obese Adolescents

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese adolescents without spinal deformities have increased prevalence and severity of juvenile disc degeneration compared with their normal-weight peers, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Editorial

Children and Parents Have Similar Responses to Pain

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- There is a significant correlation between the way parents and their children respond to pain, according to a study published online March 8 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Cognitive Therapy Found to Reduce Cortical Activation

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may improve Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS) symptoms by modifying motor cortical activation, according to a study published in the April issue of the International Journal of Cognitive Therapy.

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CDC: Family Violence Associated With Bullying

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bullies and victims of bullies have an increased likelihood of witnessing family violence or being physically hurt by a family member, according to a report in the April 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy Common in Idiopathic Autism

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment-resistant epilepsy (TRE) is relatively common in patients with autism, but surgical resection and vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation offer limited benefit, according to a study published online April 19 in Epilepsia.

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CDC: Half of States Have Smoke-Free Policies

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive smoke-free policies among U.S. states increased dramatically between 2000 and 2010, making the Healthy People 2020 target of all states having comprehensive smoke-free policies achievable with continued efforts and accelerated efforts in the Southern states, according a report in the April 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Pesticide Exposure Tied to Lower IQ in Children

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Pesticide exposure appears to be associated with poorer IQ scores in children and may impair cognitive development, according to three studies published online April 21 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract - Rauh
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Multilevel Surgery Improves Outcomes in Cerebral Palsy

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Functional and dynamic positional outcomes improve in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy who undergo single-event multilevel surgery, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Behavioral Interventions Succeed in Promoting Condom Use

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Behavioral interventions in young women to promote safer sexual behaviors to protect against transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) may be effective, primarily at encouraging condom use, according to a review published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Sedentary Life Tied to Narrow Retinal Arterioles

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Six-year-olds who spend the most time watching television, using a computer, or playing video games have narrower retinal arteries compared with those who spend more time engaged in physical activities, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Ultrasound Shows Pathology in Joints Despite Remission

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in clinical remission may continue to show signs of pathology on joint ultrasounds, which may be indicative of ongoing inflammation, according to a study published online April 11 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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More Than Five Million Youth Treated for Football Injuries

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- An estimated 5.25 million children and adolescents in the age group 6 to 17 years were treated for football-related injury in U.S. emergency departments from 1990 to 2007, according to a study published in the March issue of Clinical Pediatrics.

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Triple-Class Viral Failure Low in HIV-Infected Children

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of triple-class virological failure to three or more antiretroviral therapy (ART) drugs in children infected perinatally with HIV is low, but higher than the rate in adults, according to a study published online April 20 in The Lancet.

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Alcohol, Energy Drink Mix Impairs Behavioral Inhibition

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) increases self-reported stimulation and impairs behavioral response inhibition compared to alcohol alone, according to a study published online April 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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New Test Effective for Detection of Tuberculosis

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampicin resistance (RIF), detected by the MTB/RIF test, is accurate and feasible in resource-poor countries, according to a study published online April 19 in The Lancet.

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Airway Exam Rare in Infants With Life-Threatening Events

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Well-appearing infants hospitalized with apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) rarely undergo airway evaluation or require subsequent otolaryngologic surgical intervention, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Preterm Birth May Raise Attention Deficit Disorder Risk

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are born moderately or extremely preterm may have an increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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Low Prevalence of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Among Youth

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Incidence and prevalence rates of clinically diagnosed chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in adolescents are low, and diagnosis is more common among pediatricians than general practitioners (GPs), according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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Most Parents Consider Children's Vaccines Important

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents believe childhood vaccinations are safe and important, and while the most-trusted resource parents list for vaccine safety information is their child's doctor, non-health professional resources carry some weight as well, according to research published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Kennedy
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Societal Support Lowers Suicide Among Gay Youth

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- A negative social environment increases the risk of suicide attempts among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth, independent of individual-level risk factors, according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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Parents Feel Benefits of Genetic Testing Outweigh Risks

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are interested in getting their children tested for genetic susceptibility to common, adult-onset health conditions, according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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Adalimumab Maintains Remission of Childhood Uveitis

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children with noninfectious childhood uveitis are more likely to remain in remission when treated with adalimumab compared to infliximab, according to a study published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Stroke Outcomes Similar in Children and Young Adults

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Children and young adults who experience acute ischemic stroke tend to have similar stroke severity and clinical outcomes, even though they have different etiology and risk factors, according to a study published online March 21 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Psychiatric Symptoms More Common in Youth With Epilepsy

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Children with epilepsy (CWE) have a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms compared to their peers without epilepsy, according to a study published online March 29 in Epilepsia.

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Spinal Fusion Well Tolerated in Idiopathic Scoliosis

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Despite accelerated L5-S1 disc degeneration, patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) maintain good function and balance more than 10 years after spinal fusion, according to a study published online Feb. 1 in Spine.

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Hookah Use Widespread Among College Students

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking waterpipe tobacco, or hookah, is an increasingly popular activity among U.S. college students, and tends to be falsely perceived as being safer than cigarette smoking, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

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Single Embryo Transfer Lowers Neonatal Complications

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Complications ensuing from multiple gestations after artificial reproductive technology (ART) have increased significantly in the last 10 years and represent a burden on neonatal intensive care units (NICU), according to a study published online April 14 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Stillbirth in High-Income Nations Tied to Modifiable Risks

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Stillbirth rates in high-income countries may be influenced by modifiable risk factors, but more than 75 percent of stillbirths occur in low-income countries where the reduction in stillbirth rates is happening at a slower pace than that of mortality in children under the age of 5, according to two articles published online April 14 as part of a special series on stillbirths in The Lancet.

Abstract - Flenady
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Abstract - Cousens
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Incidence of and Hospitalization for Dengue Fever Escalate

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of and hospitalization for dengue fever increased significantly from 2000 to 2007, according to a study published online April 13 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Antibiotics for Acne May Not Up Prevalence of S. aureus

WEDNESDAY, April 13 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to common ideology, use of long-term tetracycline antibiotics for acne treatment does not appear to increase the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) or resistance to the antibiotics, according to research published online April 11 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Alternative HPV Dosing Schedules Effective in Girls

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) standard schedule vaccine or alternative dosing schedules (zero, three, and nine months and zero, six, and 12 months) are well tolerated with comparable immunogenicity in adolescent girls, according to a study published April 13 in an infectious disease and immunology themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Wrist Circumference Associated With Insulin Resistance

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Measurement of wrist circumference in obese adolescents may be a better indicator of insulin resistance than standard deviation score body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online April 11 in Circulation.

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Neurocognitive Impairment Up in Childhood Cancer Survivors

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer may be at risk of neurocognitive impairment associated with fatigue and sleep disorders, according to a study published online April 11 in Cancer.

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Negative Health Behaviors Identified in Young Parents

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of young children have lower physical activity levels compared to young adults of the same age without children, and mothers have poorer dietary intake and higher body mass index (BMI) compared to women without children, according to a study published online April 11 in Pediatrics.

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Other-Sex Friendships Early Predict Substance Use in Girls

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Girls whose friendship networks transition from girls-only to mixed-sex early in adolescence and with rapidity appear to be more likely to use alcohol and drugs in late adolescence, according to research published online March 9 in the Journal of Research on Adolescence.

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H. pylori Therapy Effective in Half of Treated Children

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- A novel eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was effective in only half of asymptomatic children tested; regardless, there were no changes in iron stores among all members of the four-arm group, though children whose infection was eradicated had higher serum ferritin levels, according to two articles published in the March issue of the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition.

Abstract - Prieto-Jimenez
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Abstract - Cardenas
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Antenatal Paracetamol Use May Be Tied to Childhood Wheeze

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used paracetamol during their pregnancy may have a slightly increased risk of childhood wheeze, according to a meta-analysis published in the April issue of Clinical & Experimental Allergy.

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Teens Born Preterm Have Less White Matter, Lower IQ

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced brain white matter (WM) among adolescents who were born preterm is linked with negative effects on their cognition, behavior, and academic success, according to a study published online March 9 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Abused or Bullied Youth at Greater Risk of Obesity

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to interpersonal violence, whether abused by their caregivers or bullied by their peers, are more likely to be obese, according to a literature review published online March 15 in Obesity Reviews.

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'Global Trigger Tool' Identifies 10 Times More Errors

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the new Global Trigger Tool, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, detects at least 10 times more adverse events than other methods currently in use, according to a study published in the April issue of Health Affairs.

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Imported Measles Cases in 2011 on Par With Recent Years

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- The total number of reported measles cases in the United States in the first two months of 2011 appears to be comparable to the number of reported cases each year between 2001 and 2010, according a report in the April 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Guidelines for Juvenile Arthritis Treatment Published

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- New guidelines for the treatment of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have been developed by the American College of Rheumatology; the guidelines are based on the best available scientific evidence and expert opinion and have been published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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New Yellow Fever Vaccine Safe and Effective

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- A new vaccine against yellow fever that contains inactivated yellow fever antigen shows promise as a safe alternative to live vaccine, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Adolescent BMI May Predict Later Obesity-Related Disease

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- An elevated body mass index (BMI) at age 17, even one within what is considered normal, may be predictive of coronary heart disease in adulthood, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Controlling Behavior Tied to Violence in Relationships

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Young women who are subject to controlling behaviors from a partner and suffering from physical and sexual relationship violence (RV) are more reticent about screening for RV, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Increase in Pediatric CT Scans in Emergency Departments

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- The use of computed tomography (CT) scans in children presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs) has increased five-fold from 1995 to 2008, and mainly occurs in nonpediatric facilities, according to a study published online April 5 in Radiology.

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Music May Increase Risk of Depressive Disorder in Teens

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents is positively correlated with music exposure, and negatively correlated with reading print media, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Non-Communicable Diseases Present a Global Health Crisis

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- The global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing, and a global movement is needed to tackle them, according to a report published online April 6 in The Lancet.

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CDC: U.S. Teen Birth Rates Down but Remain High

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Teen birth rates in the United States have declined over the last two decades, but they remain high, according a Vital Signs report in the April 5 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Annual Rise in Plagiocephaly Prevalence in Texas

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- The significant increase in the prevalence of plagiocephaly in Texas from 1999 to 2007 may be mainly due to changes in available therapies, and insurance reimbursement policies, according to a study published online April 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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High-Impact Activities Increase Fracture Risk in Girls

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Specific high-impact activities, including basketball, running, gymnastics, and cheerleading, significantly increase the risk of stress fractures among adolescent girls, according to a study published online April 4 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Little Support Found for Medication of Autism Symptoms

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Early behavioral and developmental interventions may benefit children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but there is little evidence to support medical interventions, according to three studies published online April 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Warren
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Abstract - Krishnaswami
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Abstract - McPheeters
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Community-Associated MRSA Infections Are Seasonal

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- During the summer and autumn months, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections peak in all ages; whereas hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) peaks are seen in pediatric patients only, according to a study published March 23 in PLoS ONE.

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Total Hip Arthroplasty Treats Developmental Hip Dysplasia

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Cementless modular total hip arthroplasty together with subtrochanteric osteotomy appears to be a satisfactory treatment for patients with prior Crowe Group-IV dysplasia of the hip, according to research published in the March 16 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Risks for Complications After Scoliosis Surgery Identified

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Children who undergo surgery for neuromuscular scoliosis are more likely to have major complications if they are nonambulatory and if their curve magnitude is 60 degrees or more before surgery, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of Spine.

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Inflammatory Bowel Disease Impacts Exercise Capacity

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) exhibit impaired exercise capacity compared to reference values, according to a study published online Dec. 13 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Autoimmune Diseases Number Two Cause of Chronic Illness

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune diseases are the second leading cause of chronic illness in the United States and constitute a major direct and indirect economic burden to the U.S. health care system, according to a report released by the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) on March 22 at a congressional briefing.

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