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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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April 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: May 02, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for April 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Large-Scale Autism Screening at 1 Year of Age Feasible

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Screening implemented at infants' 12-month check-ups may be able to identify autism and other developmental disorders, which can help researchers learn more about these disorders in their earliest manifestations, according to research published online April 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Children of Depressed Parents Experience More Stress

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Young children respond to stressful situations with higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol when their parents have a history of depression and exhibit negative behavior toward them, according to a study published online April 1 in Psychological Science.

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Obese White Teens May Have Increased Risk of Depression

FRIDAY, April 29 (HealthDay News) -- Non-Hispanic obese white adolescents may have an increased risk of high-depressive symptoms, according to a study published online March 14 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Autism Treatment Program May Help Toddler Subset

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- An autism treatment approach, Hanen's "More Than Words" (HMTW), appears to improve communication skills in a subset of children younger than 2 years showing early signs of an autism spectrum disorder, according to a study published online March 22 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Monthly Injection Effective for Opioid Dependence

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- A once-monthly injection of extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of opioid dependence after detoxification, according to a study published online April 28 in The Lancet.

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Regulatory Problems in Infancy Tied to Behavioral Issues

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with previous regulatory problems during infancy may have an increased risk of behavioral problems compared to controls, according to a meta-analysis published online April 20 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Post-Vietnam-Era Vets Have Highest Substance Use Rate

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Substance use rates are highest in war veterans who served in the post-Vietnam era (VET), and in those who served in Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) in Iraq and Afghanistan and have comorbid diagnoses of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, according to a study published in the May-June issue of the American Journal on Addictions.

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Anti-Inflammatory Drugs May Lower Antidepressant Efficacy

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen, aspirin, and naproxen, appear to reduce the effectiveness of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), according to a study published online April 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Tai Chi Benefits Heart Failure Patients

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi may improve quality of life, exercise self-efficacy, and mood in people with chronic systolic heart failure, according to research published in the April 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Persistent Poverty Undermines Cognitive Function at Age 5

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Persistent poverty at a very early age is an independent risk factor that can undermine a child's cognitive development at age 5, according to a study published online April 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Risk Taking Similar in Very Obese, Normal Weight Teens

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- High school students (HSS) with extreme obesity appear to engage in risky behaviors at a rate similar to that of their healthy weight peers, with higher rates of some high-risk behaviors, according to research published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Autism Diagnosis Marginally Affected by Income

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- As the prevalence rate of autism slowed, socioeconomic status (SES) seems to have become less of an impact on the likelihood of diagnosis than during times of increasing prevalence, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Sociological Review.

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Getting Right Amount of Sleep May Help With Weight Loss

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Sleeping between six and eight hours a night and having less stress may predict an individual's success in a behavioral weight loss intervention, according to a study published online March 29 in the International Journal of Obesity.

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Tooth Loss Not Independently Linked to Cognitive Function

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Tooth loss due to periodontitis is not independently associated with reduced cognitive function, but may be a marker for poor cognitive function when combined with low socioeconomic status (SES) and advanced age, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association.

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Children and Parents Have Similar Responses to Pain

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- There is a significant correlation between the way parents and their children respond to pain, according to a study published online March 8 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Diabetes Does Not Affect Sexual Dysfunction Prevalence

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual dysfunction in women with type 1 diabetes may be predicted by depression symptoms, but the prevalence is similar to that in women without type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online April 7 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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CDC: Family Violence Associated With Bullying

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bullies and victims of bullies have an increased likelihood of witnessing family violence or being physically hurt by a family member, according to a report in the April 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Depression After Traumatic Brain Injury Common

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- About 30 percent of people who suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) will experience depression, but there is a dearth of evidence to guide the care of the 1.2 million people in the United States who experience TBI each year, according to research published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

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Restricted Life Space Tied to Increased Alzheimer's Risk

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults whose life space is restricted to the home environment have a substantially increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online March 22 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

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Alcohol, Energy Drink Mix Impairs Behavioral Inhibition

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) increases self-reported stimulation and impairs behavioral response inhibition compared to alcohol alone, according to a study published online April 19 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Diagnostic Guidelines for Alzheimer's Disease Updated

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association have updated their diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease for the first time in 27 years; the guidelines have been published online April 19 in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association.

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Preterm Birth May Raise Attention Deficit Disorder Risk

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Children who are born moderately or extremely preterm may have an increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Obesity Linked to Neurodevelopmental Disorders

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal obesity and overweight may be linked to neurodevelopmental problems in offspring in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood, according to a review published online March 17 in Obesity Reviews.

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Injecting Facility Reduces Illicit Drug Use Overdose Deaths

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- A supervised injecting facility (SIF), where drug users can inject pre-obtained illicit drugs, appears to reduce overdose mortality, according to a study published online April 18 in The Lancet.

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Post-Cancer Fatigue Linked to Autonomic Nervous System

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term fatigue that affects breast cancer survivors may be caused by higher sympathetic and lower parasympathetic activity, according to a study published online March 9 in Psychoneuroendocrinology.

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Societal Support Lowers Suicide Among Gay Youth

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- A negative social environment increases the risk of suicide attempts among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth, independent of individual-level risk factors, according to a study published online April 18 in Pediatrics.

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U.S. Suicide Rates Rise During Recessions

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be a correlation between U.S. suicide rates and economic recessions, particularly among people in their prime working years, according to research published online April 14 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Psychiatric Symptoms More Common in Youth With Epilepsy

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Children with epilepsy (CWE) have a higher prevalence of psychiatric symptoms compared to their peers without epilepsy, according to a study published online March 29 in Epilepsia.

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Self-Rated Health Predicts Outcomes of Joint Replacement

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Mental well-being and self-rated health (SRH) predict outcomes of total joint replacements, more than patients' prior physical health, according to a study published online March 18 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Hookah Use Widespread Among College Students

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking waterpipe tobacco, or hookah, is an increasingly popular activity among U.S. college students, and tends to be falsely perceived as being safer than cigarette smoking, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

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Ecstasy May Reduce Hippocampal Volume

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Ecstasy (3, 4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) users have a reduced hippocampal volume, which may explain their memory deficits, according to a study published online March 28 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Diabetes and Disease Activity Predict Depression in Lupus

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes mellitus and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-related disease activity appear to increase the likelihood of developing depression in SLE, according to a study published in the April issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Memantine Not Indicated in Mild Alzheimer's Disease

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Memantine provides no treatment benefit in mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has only limited efficacy in moderate AD, according to a meta-analysis published online April 11 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Future-Directed Therapy a New Option to Treat Depression

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Future-directed therapy (FDT), a novel form of therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD) that teaches skills to help individuals focus on a more positive future, may be an effective treatment option for patients with depression, according to a study published online March 16 in CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

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Other-Sex Friendships Early Predict Substance Use in Girls

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Girls whose friendship networks transition from girls-only to mixed-sex early in adolescence and with rapidity appear to be more likely to use alcohol and drugs in late adolescence, according to research published online March 9 in the Journal of Research on Adolescence.

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Smoking After Cancer Diagnosis Worsens Quality of Life

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Caregiver mental quality of life (QoL) is worse in lung and colorectal patient-caregiver dyads in which one member of the dyad smokes, according to a study published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Teens Born Preterm Have Less White Matter, Lower IQ

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Reduced brain white matter (WM) among adolescents who were born preterm is linked with negative effects on their cognition, behavior, and academic success, according to a study published online March 9 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Abused or Bullied Youth at Greater Risk of Obesity

FRIDAY, April 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children exposed to interpersonal violence, whether abused by their caregivers or bullied by their peers, are more likely to be obese, according to a literature review published online March 15 in Obesity Reviews.

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'Global Trigger Tool' Identifies 10 Times More Errors

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the new Global Trigger Tool, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, detects at least 10 times more adverse events than other methods currently in use, according to a study published in the April issue of Health Affairs.

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Electronic Systems Reduce Drug Errors in Psychiatry

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of an electronic prescribing system and a computerized error reporting system significantly reduces the number of medication errors in a hospital's psychiatric unit, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Psychiatric Practice.

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Brain Atrophy Measures Predict Risk of Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Single-time-point or longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging measures can be used to predict which adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) are more likely to progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online April 6 in Radiology.

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Respiratory Distress Syndrome Tied to Long-Term Problems

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- People who experience acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may feel the ramifications long after discharge in terms of physical limitations, psychological problems, and incurred costs, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Controlling Behavior Tied to Violence in Relationships

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Young women who are subject to controlling behaviors from a partner and suffering from physical and sexual relationship violence (RV) are more reticent about screening for RV, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Migration May Spur Depression, Anxiety Disorders

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Mexicans who migrate to the United States appear to be at higher risk for depressive and anxiety disorders than their family members who stay in Mexico, though this association is seen only in younger birth cohorts, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Being Poor Associated With Higher Risk of Mental Disorders

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- People from low-income households may be at increased risk of mental disorders, and a decrease in household income is linked to an increased risk for incident mental disorders, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Music May Increase Risk of Depressive Disorder in Teens

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- Major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents is positively correlated with music exposure, and negatively correlated with reading print media, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Maximum Daily Opioid Doses Increase Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients prescribed higher daily opioid doses for pain are at increased risk of opioid overdose death, according to a study published in the April 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Neural Correlates Found for Addictive Eating Behavior

TUESDAY, April 5 (HealthDay News) -- Addictive-like eating behavior appears to be linked with neural activation patterns similar to those seen in substance dependence, according to research published online April 4 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Little Support Found for Medication of Autism Symptoms

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Early behavioral and developmental interventions may benefit children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), but there is little evidence to support medical interventions, according to three studies published online April 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Warren
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Medication, Communication Alleviate Latino Depression

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Among Latinos, symptoms of depression are more likely to abate with the use of antidepressants and quality doctor-patient communication, but symptoms are more likely to persist in the presence of stigma toward antidepressants, according to a study published online Jan. 19 in General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Autoimmune Diseases Number Two Cause of Chronic Illness

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune diseases are the second leading cause of chronic illness in the United States and constitute a major direct and indirect economic burden to the U.S. health care system, according to a report released by the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) on March 22 at a congressional briefing.

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