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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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April 2011 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: May 02, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for April 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Increasing Cancer Burden Projected for Ethnic Minorities

THURSDAY, April 28 (HealthDay News) -- Consideration of genetic, ethnic, biologic, and sociological factors is necessary to appropriately diagnose and treat cancer in all U.S. subpopulations, according to the President's Cancer Panel 2009 to 2010 report published April 28.

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Researchers Explore Genetic Basis for BCG Disease

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic mutations affecting interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) may thwart the development of monocytes and dendritic cells and impair antimycobacterial immunity, according to research published online April 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lung Problems Common During and After Natural Disasters

WEDNESDAY, April 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pulmonary complications resulting from direct or indirect injury to the lung are a major cause of morbidity and mortality following natural disasters, according to a review published in the April issue of Respirology.

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Black Cancer Patients More Willing to Pay to Extend Life

TUESDAY, April 26 (HealthDay News) -- Black cancer patients are more willing to expend their personal financial resources in order to extend life compared to white cancer patients, according to a study published online April 26 in Cancer.

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AAP: Chemical Management Policy Needs Revision

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stating that the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 has failed to protect children, pregnant women, and others from marketplace exposure to harmful chemicals, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends current U.S. chemical management policy be revised, according to a policy report published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Risk Taking Similar in Very Obese, Normal Weight Teens

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- High school students (HSS) with extreme obesity appear to engage in risky behaviors at a rate similar to that of their healthy weight peers, with higher rates of some high-risk behaviors, according to research published online April 25 in Pediatrics.

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Inhaled Corticosteroids May Decrease Mortality in COPD

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Prior use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with a decreased risk of short-term mortality and use of mechanical ventilation following hospitalization for pneumonia, according to a study published online April 21 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Smoking Cessation May Prevent Cancer in Liver Recipients

MONDAY, April 25 (HealthDay News) -- Liver transplant recipients who quit smoking after transplantation have a lower incidence of smoking-related malignancies (SRMs) compared with patients who continue smoking, according to a study published in the April issue of Liver Transplantation.

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Asthma May Increase Risk of Erectile Dysfunction

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma may be an independent risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED), with the risk increasing with asthma severity, according to a study published online March 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Brief, Intense Exercise May Have Cardioprotective Role

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Brief, intense exercise is a time-efficient alternative to traditional endurance training and reduces the level of various markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in adolescents, according to a study published online April 4 in the American Journal of Human Biology.

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Studies Add to Evidence on Clot Risk Tied to Contraceptives

FRIDAY, April 22 (HealthDay News) -- Oral contraceptives containing drospirenone appear to be associated with a higher risk of non-fatal venous thromboembolism than formulations containing levonorgestrel, according to two studies published online April 21 in BMJ.

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CDC: Half of States Have Smoke-Free Policies

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive smoke-free policies among U.S. states increased dramatically between 2000 and 2010, making the Healthy People 2020 target of all states having comprehensive smoke-free policies achievable with continued efforts and accelerated efforts in the Southern states, according a report in the April 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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It Pays to Screen Immigrants for Tuberculosis

THURSDAY, April 21 (HealthDay News) -- Screening immigrants to the United Kingdom for latent tuberculosis infection based on the incidence in their countries of origin is a cost-effective way of preventing future active cases of tuberculosis, according to a study published online April 21 in The Lancet.

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Polymorphism Linked With Pulmonary Fibrosis

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified a common variant in the putative promoter of the gene encoding mucin 5B (MUC5B), giving new insight into the pathogenesis of familial interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; their findings have been published in the April 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physical Activity Guidelines May Improve Survival

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Meeting the recommendations set out in the federal 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans is associated with reduced all-cause mortality in U.S. adults, according to a study published online April 5 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Low-Cost Thromboprophylaxis by Electronic Alerts Effective

WEDNESDAY, April 20 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic alert (e-alert) systems are cost-effective tools for reducing venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, according to a study published online April 11 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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New Test Effective for Detection of Tuberculosis

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) and rifampicin resistance (RIF), detected by the MTB/RIF test, is accurate and feasible in resource-poor countries, according to a study published online April 19 in The Lancet.

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Airway Exam Rare in Infants With Life-Threatening Events

TUESDAY, April 19 (HealthDay News) -- Well-appearing infants hospitalized with apparent life-threatening events (ALTEs) rarely undergo airway evaluation or require subsequent otolaryngologic surgical intervention, according to research published in the April issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Do-Not-Resuscitate Order Linked to Increased Surgical Mortality

MONDAY, April 18 (HealthDay News) -- Surgical patients with do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders have more complications and a higher mortality rate than non-DNR patients, according to a study published online April 18 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Nocturia May Indicate Sleep Apnea in Patients With BPH

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be the cause of frequent night awakenings and urination in patients with benign prostate enlargement (BPE) reporting nocturia, according to a study published in the March-April issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

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Geneva Score Prognostic in Patients Ruled Out for PE

FRIDAY, April 15 (HealthDay News) -- Assessment of clinical probability with a revised Geneva score (RGS) could help predict prognosis in patients for whom pulmonary embolism (PE) has been ruled out, according to research published in the April issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Hookah Use Widespread Among College Students

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking waterpipe tobacco, or hookah, is an increasingly popular activity among U.S. college students, and tends to be falsely perceived as being safer than cigarette smoking, according to a study published online Feb. 25 in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

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Anesthesia Complications Twice As Likely in Obese

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Airway management is a basic anesthetic responsibility and skill, and strategies need to be implemented to appropriately manage difficult airways, according to the Fourth National Audit Project (NAP4) of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Difficult Airway Society, published online March 29 in the British Journal of Anaesthesia.

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Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion May Increase Use of Available Lungs

THURSDAY, April 14 (HealthDay News) -- Use of normothermic ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP), which allows for assessment of a donor lung's function, could render suitable for transplantation lungs that otherwise would not have been considered, according to research published in the April 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Fixed-Dose Combos Equally Effective in TB Treatment

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with separately administered drugs, a four-drug fixed-dose combination (FDC) regimen partially satisfies noninferiority criteria for tuberculosis treatment, according to a study published April 13 in an infectious disease and immunology themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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End-of-Life Care for Medicare Patients Changing

TUESDAY, April 12 (HealthDay News) -- Care for chronically ill Medicare patients at end-of-life changed between 2003 and 2007, with patients spending less time in the hospital and more time in hospice care, and care also grew more intense during that five-year period, according to a new Dartmouth Atlas Project report.

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Smoking After Cancer Diagnosis Worsens Quality of Life

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Caregiver mental quality of life (QoL) is worse in lung and colorectal patient-caregiver dyads in which one member of the dyad smokes, according to a study published in the February issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Imatinib Reduces Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis Symptoms

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Imatinib mesylate is well tolerated by patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) with improvement in skin thickening and forced vital capacity (FVC), according to a study published online March 11 in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

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Antenatal Paracetamol Use May Be Tied to Childhood Wheeze

MONDAY, April 11 (HealthDay News) -- Children whose mothers used paracetamol during their pregnancy may have a slightly increased risk of childhood wheeze, according to a meta-analysis published in the April issue of Clinical & Experimental Allergy.

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'Global Trigger Tool' Identifies 10 Times More Errors

THURSDAY, April 7 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the new Global Trigger Tool, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, detects at least 10 times more adverse events than other methods currently in use, according to a study published in the April issue of Health Affairs.

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Respiratory Distress Syndrome Tied to Long-Term Problems

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- People who experience acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may feel the ramifications long after discharge in terms of physical limitations, psychological problems, and incurred costs, according to research published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Non-Communicable Diseases Present a Global Health Crisis

WEDNESDAY, April 6 (HealthDay News) -- The global burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing, and a global movement is needed to tackle them, according to a report published online April 6 in The Lancet.

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Rapid Tuberculosis Diagnostic Methods Inaccurate Alone

MONDAY, April 4 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid microbial and immunological diagnostic methods are not accurate enough to diagnose or exclude pulmonary tuberculosis, according to a study published online March 21 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Cancer Rates, Cancer Mortality Rates Falling in U.S.

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Newly diagnosed cancer rates and cancer-related mortality rates in the United States are steadily declining, according to the "Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer," published online March 31 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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Autoimmune Diseases Number Two Cause of Chronic Illness

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Autoimmune diseases are the second leading cause of chronic illness in the United States and constitute a major direct and indirect economic burden to the U.S. health care system, according to a report released by the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) on March 22 at a congressional briefing.

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