Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pathology | Urology | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

ASCO: Early PSA Test Can Predict Long-Term Cancer Risk

Last Updated: May 19, 2011.

 

Researchers say initial PSA test should occur at age 44 to 50; if levels low, annual test unneeded

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Men with low prostate-specific antigen levels upon initial testing at age 44 to 50 years are at lower risk for aggressive prostate cancer and do not need to undergo annual testing, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels upon initial testing at age 44 to 50 years are at lower risk for aggressive prostate cancer and do not need to undergo annual testing, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

As part of the Malmö Preventive Project in Sweden, Hans Lilja, M.D., Ph.D., of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, and colleagues evaluated archived blood samples from 12,090 men aged 44 to 50 years who provided blood between 1974 and 1986, and repeat samples from 4,999 of those men six years later. The investigators also analyzed blood samples from an independent cohort of 1,167 men aged 60 years. All of the men included in the analysis had not undergone any screening for prostate cancer.

The data revealed that a PSA level below the median among men aged 44 to 50 years was associated with a very low risk of prostate cancer death or metastases within 15 years, but not necessarily lifetime risk. In addition, the risk decreased significantly, down to 0.5 percent, for 60-year-olds with a PSA level below the median. The investigators suggest that men should receive an initial PSA screening at age 44 to 50 and that those at low risk at this screening should not undergo annual PSA testing but instead have a second test between ages 51 and 55. If their PSA levels are still low, they should receive a final test at age 60, according to the investigators.

"This research helps us distinguish between those men who may benefit from regular PSA screening for prostate cancer and those men who may not need to be screened so frequently," Lilja said in a statement. "Instead of testing all men each year or every two years, screening and surveillance efforts can be focused on early detection of prostate cancer in those men who are found to be at high risk of death from the disease."

Abstract No. 4512
More Information

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Violent Death Rates for Infants, Children Have Dropped Next: In Vivo 3-D Cervical Spine Kinematics Demonstrated

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.