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American Urological Association, May 14-19, 2011

Last Updated: May 24, 2011.

 

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The American Urological Association's 2011 Annual Meeting

The annual meeting of the American Urological Association was held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C., and attracted more than 12,000 participants from around the world. The conference highlighted recent advances in the prevention, detection, and treatment of urologic conditions, with presentations focusing on the advancement of urologic patient care.

As part of the ongoing Law Enforcement Cardiac Screening program, Boback Berookhim, M.D., of the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City, and colleagues found that erectile dysfunction was associated with a high risk for sleep apnea.

"The key finding of our study was that, among the first responders to the World Trade Center site, those with a history of erectile dysfunction were more than twice as likely to be at a high risk for sleep apnea as compared to their counterparts without erectile dysfunction, even after adjusting for known comorbidities," Berookhim said. "In addition, as the severity of erectile dysfunction worsened in these patients, the rate of being at high risk for sleep apnea increased."

After adjusting for confounding factors, the investigators found that the presence of erectile dysfunction was still significantly associated with an increased risk for sleep apnea.

"Patients who present with erectile dysfunction should be screened for sleep apnea, as untreated sleep apnea has been shown to be associated with stroke, heart attack, diabetes, and other significant health issues," Berookhim said.

Press Release

In another study, researchers in Dallas found that children with urolithiasis were at a higher risk of fracture due to low bone-mineral density. The investigators retrospectively reviewed data on 132 pediatric patients, with an average age of 12.2 years, who underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans (DXA) for urolithiasis.

"Pediatric stone disease may identify an at-risk population for future osteoporosis and fractures. Over 40 percent of our pediatric stone formers had Z-scores <−1.0, a value associated with increased fracture risk in children," the authors write. "Screening DXA scans should be performed in pediatric stone-formers and/or hypercalciurics, particularly in those with a history of fracture. Since adolescence is the period for peak bone mass accrual, it may be the ideal time for dietary and/or medical intervention to decrease future osteoporotic risk."

Press Release

In a retrospective review, Thomas Polascik, M.D., of the Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., and colleagues found that cigarette smoking was associated with advanced renal cell cancer. The investigators evaluated 845 patients who underwent surgery for renal cell cancer between 2000 and 2009.

"The key finding of our study was that cigarette smoking correlated with advanced renal cell carcinoma in terms of number of years smoked and the quantity of packs smoked per day," Polascik said.

The investigators found that current and former smokers had a 1.5- and 1.6-fold increased odds of advanced disease, respectively. Longer smoking duration and exposure were associated with increased risk of advanced renal cell carcinoma.

"The good news is that, once one stops smoking, the risk can drop down to almost that of a nonsmoker. For example, if someone stops smoking for 30 years, their risk drops down to nearly that of a nonsmoker. For every 10 years that passes without smoking, the risk of advanced kidney cancer drops by 9 percent," Polascik said.

Press Release

AUA: Human Papillomavirus Prevalent in Male Foreskin

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) is prevalent in the foreskin of males, suggesting that boys should be vaccinated before adolescence, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C.

Abstract No. 1423
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AUA: Diet and Caloric Intake Tied to Kidney Stone Formation

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Modifying total daily caloric intake, reducing the amount of meat intake, and consuming more fresh fruit and fiber may reduce the risk of kidney stones, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C.

Abstract No. 2139
Abstract No. 2146
Abstract No. 2233
Abstract No. 2239
Abstract No. 1825
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AUA: Surgery for Apnea May Help Resolve Enuresis

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy (T&A) may help resolve enuresis in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C.

Abstract No. 827
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AUA: Prostate-Specific Antigen Testing Utility Studied

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Optimizing the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing may help to better identify patients with prostate cancer and improve outcomes, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C.

Abstract No. 986
Abstract No. 2025
Abstract No. 2032
Abstract No. 1197
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AUA: Abiraterone Found Effective in Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with castration-resistant prostate cancer progressing after docetaxel-based chemotherapy benefit from abiraterone acetate (AA) with low-dose prednisone (P), according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association, held from May 14 to 19 in Washington, D.C.

Abstract No. 705
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Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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