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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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May 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: June 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Operative Time of Day Not Tied to Transplant Survival

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- The operative time of day does not significantly affect one-year survival of thoracic transplant recipients, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Use of Energy Drinks Should Be Discouraged in Children

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Sports and energy drink consumption is widespread, and youth should be made aware of the potential health risks of those drinks, according to a clinical report published online May 29 in Pediatrics.

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Education Increases Support for Family-Witnessed CPR

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Presentation of an evidence-based family-witnessed resuscitation (FWR) education program to cardiopulmonary resuscitation providers may modify their opinions and increase their support for FWR, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

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Racial and Ethnic Disparities Exist in U.S. Stroke Care

MONDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in many aspects of stroke care as compared to whites, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association published online May 26 in Stroke.

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Phone Counseling Improves Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) coupled with a walking program may not improve A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and depression, but it appears to improve other important outcomes, according to research published online April 6 in Medical Care.

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Childhood Obesity Linked to Psoriasis

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are significantly more likely to have psoriasis than their normal-weight peers, and may have increased levels of cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published online April 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids Have Novel Antithrombotic Effects

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) treatment for patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) may decrease thrombin formation and oxidative stress, and improve fibrin clot properties, according to a study published online May 26 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

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Polypills May Reduce Blood Pressure and LDL Cholesterol

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of combination cardiovascular medications, or polypills, is associated with significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to a study published online May 25 in PLoS One.

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Discrepancies Exist in National Hypertension Estimates

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), Wave IV, indicate that hypertension among young adults may be much higher than previously thought based on the 2007 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), according to a study published online May 23 in Epidemiology.

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Low Statin Adherence After Coronary Revascularization

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease (CAD) have significantly lower statin adherence following coronary revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI] and coronary artery bypass graft surgery [CABG]) than after medical therapy, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Locomotor Training for Stroke Rehab Offers No Advantage

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant difference between locomotor training and home exercise for rehabilitation after a stroke, according to a study published in the May 26 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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Psoriasis Linked to Difficult-to-Manage Hypertension

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertensive patients with psoriasis are more likely to have difficult-to-control hypertension compared to hypertensive patients without psoriasis, according to a study published online March 29 in PLoS One.

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Elevated Copeptin Linked to Mortality Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among elderly patients with heart failure, elevated concentrations of copeptin alone or in combination with elevated concentrations of N-terminal fragment of the precursor to B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are correlated with increased all-cause mortality risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fish Cooking Method Affects Heart Failure Risk in Women

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of baked or broiled fish and decreased intake of fried fish may reduce incident heart failure risk in postmenopausal women, according to a study published online May 24 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation Tied to Increased Mortality

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) may have an increased risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality, according to a study published May 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Vascular Disease May Increase Stroke or Death Risk in A-Fib

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Vascular disease, such as peripheral artery disease (PAD) or prior myocardial infarction (MI), is an independent risk factor for stroke or death in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online April 19 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Use of CCTA Screening Tied to Increased Invasive Testing

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Low-risk adults who undergo coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) screening use more medications and undergo invasive coronary procedures, according to a study published online May 23 in Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Higher Lung Cancer Incidence in Heart Transplant Patients

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of lung cancer among heart transplantation (HT) patients may be higher than in the general population, and this increase is not associated with an increased prevalence of smokers among HT patients, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Excessive Business Travel Tied to Poor Health, Obesity

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- People who travel extensively for business are more likely to be obese and to rate their health as poor or fair than peers whose business travel demands are lighter, according to research published in the April issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Selenium Has Modest Benefits for Plasma Lipid Levels

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium supplementation appears to modestly benefit plasma lipid levels among individuals with relatively low selenium status, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Systemic Sclerosis Linked to Coronary Calcification

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an independent risk factor for coronary calcification in addition to other conventional risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis, such as age and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation May Lower All-Cause Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant decrease in all-cause mortality rates, according to a study published online May 16 in Circulation.

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BMI of 35kg/m² or More Associated With Mortality

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- In older U.S. adults, moderately severe obesity may be related to mortality, whereas lower levels of obesity are correlated with new or worsening disability within two years, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Disease Risk Similar in Children Treated for ADHD

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) agents by children is not significantly associated with cardiovascular events or death, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Tele-ICU Tied to Lower Mortality, Shorter Hospital Stay

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a tele-intensive care unit (ICU) intervention is correlated with reduced mortality risk, length of hospital stay, preventable complications rates, and improvements in best practice adherence, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Carotid Stenting Riskier Than Surgery in Women

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo carotid artery stenting may be at higher risk for stroke than those who undergo endarterectomy, but little difference is seen between men who undergo one of the two blockage clearing procedures, according to research published online May 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Poor Cardiovascular Outcomes for U.S. Women

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, women have worse cardiovascular treatment and outcomes than men, according to the Women's Health in American Hospitals report released on May 3 by HealthGrades.

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FDA: Defibtech Lifeline and ReviveR Defibrillators Recalled

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Defibtech has issued a class I recall of Lifeline and ReviveR automated external defibrillators (AEDs), including model DDU-100 series with software version 2.004 or earlier, as AEDs using software version 2.004 or earlier may cause the device to cancel shock during the charging process.

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Case-Based Training for GPs Lowers Heart Disease Risks

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Use of case-based training for general practitioners to implement evidence-based guidelines with intensified lipid-lowering recommendations is associated with a decrease in the 10-year mortality rates in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Heart Failure Linked to Higher Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure is associated with an increased risk for vertebral compression fracture (VCF), and more than half of those with VCF have multiple fractures, according to a study published online May 10 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

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Limited Evidence Exists for Alzheimer's Risk Factors

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The existing evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the association of any modifiable factor with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online May 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

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No Benefit to Epoetin Alfa Bolus After PCI for STEMI

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who undergo successful reperfusion may not benefit from a single intravenous bolus of epoetin alfa within four hours of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Optimal Medical Therapy Often Not Applied Before PCI

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half the patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) receive optimal medical therapy (OMT) before PCI; whereas, approximately two-thirds receive it following PCI, with similar practice patterns seen before and after publication of the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) trial, according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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NSAIDs May Increase Cardio Risk in MI Patients

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with prior myocardial infarction (MI), even short-term treatment with most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with an increased risk of recurrent MI and death, according to a study published online May 9 in Circulation.

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Fourteen Percent of Ischemic Strokes Are Wake-Up Strokes

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Wake-up strokes constitute a substantial percentage of all strokes and cannot be easily distinguished from non-wake-up strokes, according to a study published in the May 10 issue of Neurology.

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Low Vitamin D Tied to Adiposity and High HDL in Children

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are associated with high measures of adiposity and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both black and white children, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Diabetes Symptoms Improve With Aerobic Exercise

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Aerobic exercise alone or combined with resistance training significantly improves cardiovascular (CV) risk factors including hemoglobin A1c, systolic blood pressure (SBP), triglycerides, and waist circumference in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published online April 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Arsenic in Drinking Water Tied to Heart Disease Mortality

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to arsenic in drinking water appears to be adversely associated with mortality from cardiovascular disease in Bangladesh, particularly among cigarette smokers, according to a study published online May 5 in BMJ.

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FDA Sanctions Wider Use of Carotid Stent

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- More people with carotid artery stenosis are now candidates for the RX Acculink carotid stent, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

Medline Plus

Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Mortality in Diabetes

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Severe vitamin D deficiency may be predictive of increased all-cause mortality in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not associated with microvascular complications in the kidney or eye, according to a study published online April 27 in Diabetes Care.

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Ultrasound Viable Option to Radiography in Acute Dyspnea

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- For most pulmonary diseases causing dyspnea, ultrasonography and radiography demonstrate high concordance, but ultrasound is more accurate at identifying free pleural effusion, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

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HRS: Survival High in Cardiac Arrest at Exercise Facilities

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) that occurs at an exercise facility, whether traditional (such as a gym) or nontraditional (such as a dance studio or bowling alley), is associated with a high rate of survival, according to research presented at the Heart Rhythm Society's Annual Scientific Sessions, held from May 4 to 7 in San Francisco.

Abstract No. AB17-1
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Aneurysmal Rupture Triggers Include Drinking Coffee

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eight triggers that increase the risk of aneurysmal rupture have been identified, including drinking coffee and vigorous physical exercise, according to a study published online May 5 in Stroke.

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Cardiac Catheterization Useful for Children but Has Risks

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac catheterization in children has inherent risks, it can be used for diagnosis and treatment of several heart conditions, according to a scientific statement by the American Heart Association published online May 4 in Circulation.

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High Cost of Care for Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Medical costs are higher for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with controls, due to increased inpatient and outpatient costs, according to a study published online May 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Individualized Guidelines May Improve Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Individualized guidelines that calculate the risk reduction expected from treatment, and which rank individuals in order of decreasing expected benefit, may be useful for increasing the quality and reducing the cost of care, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Urinary Sodium Excretion Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Lower sodium excretion is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lot of Warfarin Tablets Recalled

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Bristol-Myers Squibb is voluntarily recalling a lot of warfarin sodium (Coumadin) 5 mg tablets after a tablet from one bottle was discovered to have a higher potency than it should, according to a safety alert posted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Structured Exercise Beats Advice Only for Lowering HbA1c

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Structured exercise training is associated with a reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in patients with type 2 diabetes, while physical activity advice is associated with lower HbA1c only when combined with dietary advice, according to a meta-analysis published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Significant Reduction in U.S. Coronary Bypass Rates

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) utilization rates in the United States decreased significantly between 2001 and 2008, but percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) utilization rates remained unchanged, according to a study published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Central Obesity Tied to Cardiac Patient Mortality

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Central obesity is associated with increased mortality in individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD), even in those with a normal body mass index (BMI), according to a review published in the May 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Young Americans Do Not Consider Stroke Health Threat

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Most young Americans believe their current health behaviors will not affect their future risks of stroke and cardiovascular diseases, according to results of a survey released on May 2 by the American Stroke Association.

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