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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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May 2011 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: June 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Cell Phones May Be Tied to Higher Risk of Glioma

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Cell phones may be associated with an increased risk of brain cancer, a panel of experts reporting to the World Health Organization (WHO) announced May 31.

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Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stress and Abuse Not Linked to Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Stress at home in adulthood and physical or sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence are not associated with the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published in the May 31 issue of Neurology.

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Use of Energy Drinks Should Be Discouraged in Children

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Sports and energy drink consumption is widespread, and youth should be made aware of the potential health risks of those drinks, according to a clinical report published online May 29 in Pediatrics.

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Environmentally Mediated Diseases and Costs Increasing

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- The annual economic burden of environmentally mediated diseases in U.S. children increased from $54.9 billion in 2002 to $76.6 billion in 2008, according to a study published in the May issue of Health Affairs.

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Lack of Sleep May Increase Body Mass Index in Children

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Young children who do not get enough sleep may have an increased risk of becoming overweight, according to a study published online May 26 in BMJ.

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Length of Maternity Leave Tied to Breast-Feeding Behavior

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- The duration of breast-feeding among U.S. mothers may be longer if they delay their time of return to work, according to a study published online May 29 in Pediatrics.

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Country-Specific Tool Predicts Adverse Perinatal Outcomes

MONDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- A new generic reference tool is better at predicting low fetal weight and adverse perinatal outcomes among global populations, according to a study published in the May 28 issue of The Lancet.

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Acetaminophen Prescriptions for Children Often Incorrect

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Off-label prescribing of acetaminophen (paracetamol) occurs frequently, with potential overdosing risks in infants, and potential underdosing for children aged 6 to 12, according to a study published online May 18 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Television in Child's Bedroom Linked to Unhealthy Lifestyle

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Having a TV in the bedroom (TVIB) is associated with unhealthy behaviors in Hispanic children, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the American Journal of Health Promotion.

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Childhood Obesity Linked to Psoriasis

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are significantly more likely to have psoriasis than their normal-weight peers, and may have increased levels of cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published online April 29 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Majority of U.K. Hospitals Offer Child Head Trauma Care

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although the majority of U.K. hospitals have an established pathway for managing head injuries in children, many hospitals are lacking on-site services to care for a critically ill child, according to a study published online May 23 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Discrepancies Exist in National Hypertension Estimates

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Estimates from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), Wave IV, indicate that hypertension among young adults may be much higher than previously thought based on the 2007 to 2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), according to a study published online May 23 in Epidemiology.

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Mortality Higher in Early-Term Infants Than Full-Term Infants

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Early-term infants are at a higher mortality risk than those born at full term, and there are racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality rates for early-term and full-term births, according to a study published in the June issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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U.S. National Rate of Home Births Increases

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The percentage of home births in the United States increased between 2004 and 2008, according to a study published online May 20 in Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care.

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Pediatric Medical Emergencies Increase in the U.K.

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- The number of children presenting to emergency departments in the United Kingdom increased between 1997 and 2007 to 2008, although the majority of medical conditions presented remain the same, according to a study published online May 23 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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Top Five Clinical Activities Identified for Improving Care

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- A panel of physicians from the National Physicians Alliance (NPA) have identified common clinical activities, which could improve quality of care and use of clinical resources, according to a study published online May 23 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Patient Outcomes Tied to Primary Care Workforce

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) --A higher level of primary care physician workforce is associated with favorable patient outcomes, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Selective Abortion of Girls Increasing in India

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- It is becoming increasingly common in families in India to abort female fetuses if the firstborn was a girl, particularly in wealthier, better-educated households, according to research published online May 24 in The Lancet.

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Child's Access to Dental Care Tied to Insurance Provider

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Children with private dental insurance are significantly more likely to attain an appointment for an urgent oral injury compared to those with Medicaid coverage, even in dental practices enrolled in the Medicaid program, according to a study published online May 23 in Pediatrics.

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Excess Medical Costs Tied to Diabetes in Youth Substantial

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The excess medical expenditures related to diabetes among youth are substantial, and this is particularly true for insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (ITDM), according to a study published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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High Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Obese Teens

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescents have a very high prevalence of low vitamin D status, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Psychological Distress Tied to Risky Driving in Youth

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological distress among young novice drivers is linked to risky driving behavior, according to a study published online May 16 in Injury Prevention.

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Inappropriate Antibiotic Prescribing Common in Asthma

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Inappropriate antibiotic prescribing appears to be relatively common among children with asthma, according to two studies published online May 23 in Pediatrics.

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Increase in Developmental Disabilities in U.S. Children

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of developmental disabilities increased in the United States from 1997 to 2008, according to a study published online May 23 in Pediatrics.

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FDA: SimplyThick Should Not Be Used in Premature Infants

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified parents, caregivers, and health care providers not to administer SimplyThick to infants born prior to 37 weeks, as the product may cause necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a life-threatening gastrointestinal condition.

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CDC: Swimmer's Ear Results in Over Two Million Visits Yearly

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Acute otitis externa (AOE), also known as swimmer's ear, is associated with a large number of doctor visits and substantial medical costs annually, according a report in the May 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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No Skin Atrophy With Long-Term Topical Corticosteroids

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term use of topical corticosteroids (TCS) in children with dermatitis does not cause skin atrophy, according to a study published online April 20 in Pediatric Dermatology.

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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Violent Death Rates for Infants, Children Have Dropped

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a decrease in the rates of violent death in infancy and middle childhood, according to a study published online April 27 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Binge Drinking Linked With Poor Declarative Memory

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking (BD) is correlated with poorer verbal declarative memory, irrespective of gender, according to a study published online May 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Free Gracilis Transfer in Children Improves Smile

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic facial reanimation using free gracilis transfer in children has an acceptable success rate, significantly improves smile, and may improve quality of life (QOL) with respect to facial function, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Prenatal Vitamin A May Not Reduce Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Weekly supplementation with vitamin A or beta carotene during pregnancy is not associated with a reduction in pregnancy-related or infant mortality in Bangladesh, according to a study published in the May 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Propranolol Effectively Treats Infantile Hemangiomas

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Propranolol appears to be an effective first-line therapy in the treatment of infantile head and neck hemangiomas, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Triamcinolone Ineffective in Eustachian Tube Dysfunction

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Tympanometric manifestation of eustachian tube dysfunction (ETD) may not be normalized by treatment with intranasal aqueous triamcinolone acetonide (TAA-AQ), according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Major Birth Defects Not Linked to Newer Antiepileptic Drugs

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to newer-generation antiepileptic drugs in the first trimester of pregnancy is not correlated with an increase in major birth defects in a Danish cohort of live-born infants, according to a study published in the May 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Physician Advice May Improve Teen Smoking Behavior

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' tobacco-related interactions with adolescents, including screening and advice, may help to modify teen attitudes, smoking intentions, and quitting behaviors, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Heart Disease Risk Similar in Children Treated for ADHD

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) agents by children is not significantly associated with cardiovascular events or death, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Early Diagnoses of Autism Increasing in Massachusetts

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are increasing in Massachusetts, especially among boys, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Eczema, Rhinitis Predict Adult Asthma

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Children who have eczema and rhinitis may be more susceptible to atopic asthma in adulthood, according to research published online April 4 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Hydroxycarbamide Effective for Infant Sickle-Cell Anemia

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Hydroxycarbamide therapy may be safe and effective for treating infants with sickle-cell anemia, according to a study published in the May 14 issue of The Lancet.

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Laser Saves at Least One Twin in Twin-Twin Transfusion

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of selective laser photocoagulation of communicating vessels (SLPCV) for patients with twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) show improved perinatal survival of at least one twin independent of the Quintero stage, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Firearm Homicide Rates Higher in Metropolitan Areas

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) usually have higher rates of firearm-related homicides than the national average, and the rate in youths exceeds the all-ages rate in most MSAs and cities, according to a report in the May 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Marital Instability May Predict Sleep Problems in Children

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Marital instability prospectively predicts early childhood sleep patterns, even after controlling for factors such as sleep problems, and eliminating shared genetic influences, according to a study published online May 11 in Child Development.

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Breast-Feeding May Lower Odds of Behavioral Problems

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding for at least four months is associated with reduced odds of behavioral problems at age 5 years in term children, but the correlation is less clear for preterm children, according to a study published online May 9 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Neonatal Vitamin D Deficiency Tied to Respiratory Disease

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy neonates with vitamin D deficiency are at a higher risk of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in the first year of life, according to a study published online May 9 in Pediatrics.

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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Spontaneous Resolution Affects Cost of Tear Duct Probing

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The relative cost-effectiveness of immediate office-based probing surgery (IOPS) and deferred facility-based probing surgery (DFBS) for treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction in infants depends on the rate of spontaneous resolution, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Observing Children With Head Injury Reduces CT Scan Use

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical observation is associated with reduced computed tomography (CT) use among children with minor blunt head trauma, according to a study published online May 9 in Pediatrics.

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Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders Underestimated

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be more prevalent in children than previously estimated and are found in children in mainstream schools as well as special education schools, according to a study published online May 9 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Low Vitamin D Tied to Adiposity and High HDL in Children

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels are associated with high measures of adiposity and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in both black and white children, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Sleep Duration Tied to Infant Growth Spurts

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increased sleep duration and episodes among infants appear to be associated with growth spurts in body length, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of SLEEP.

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Self-Image Impacts Pain Perception in Scoliosis Patients

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) report experiencing back pain, and those who perceive themselves as less deformed or have less of a desire to change their spinal deformity have a greater reduction in pain after posterior spinal fusion surgery, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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Adding Omalizumab May Improve Uncontrolled Asthma

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Omalizumab appears to provide additional clinical benefits in patients with severe allergic asthma that is inadequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting beta2-agonists (LABAs), according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Anesthesia in Infancy Not Linked to Poor Academic Scores

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Brief anesthetic exposure during a surgery in infancy does not reduce academic performance in adolescence, according to a study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

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Infant Acetaminophen Drugs to Be Discontinued

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- The manufacturers of cold and fever medications that contain acetaminophen have announced that they will discontinue production of infant-drop formulations of the products to avoid confusion that could result in overdoses, according to a report from the Associated Press.

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Community Intervention Can Improve HIV Testing Rates

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- The use of community-based voluntary counseling and testing (CBVCT) appears to improve initial and repeat HIV testing rates in remote communities as compared with standard, clinic-based VCT (SVCT), according to a study published online May 4 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Cardiac Catheterization Useful for Children but Has Risks

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac catheterization in children has inherent risks, it can be used for diagnosis and treatment of several heart conditions, according to a scientific statement by the American Heart Association published online May 4 in Circulation.

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Prolonged Bottle Use Linked With Childhood Obesity

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged bottle use up to 24 months is independently associated with obesity at age 5.5 years, according to a study published online May 5 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Better After Adenotonsillectomy

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- In children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), sleep-disordered breathing improves after adenotonsillectomy possibly due to decreases in the sympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

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Leukotriene-Receptor Antagonists Effective in Asthma

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Use of a leukotriene-receptor antagonist (LTRA) may be as effective as an inhaled glucocorticoid as first-line controller therapy, and as effective as a long-acting beta2-agonist (LABA) as an add-on therapy, for the treatment of asthma patients, according to the findings of two pragmatic trials published in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Unit-Based Team Design Improves Communication

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians and nurses who work on unit-based teams appear to experience improved communication with one another, which may result in a better environment for patient safety, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Caregiver English Skills Tied to Length of Hospital Stay

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric inpatients with infection requiring long-term antibiotic treatment whose primary caregiver has limited English proficiency are likely to have a longer length of stay (LOS) in the hospital, and fewer home health care referrals, according to a study published online May 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Cerebral Cortex Enlargement Found in Children With Autism

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have generalized cerebral cortical enlargement with disproportionate enlargement in temporal lobe white matter, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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CDC: Asthma Prevalence on the Rise in United States

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of asthma among both adults and children has increased in the last decade, and asthma costs have increased in recent years as well, according to a report in the May 3 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Nearly One in 10 Infants Given Supplements and Teas

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 9 percent of infants, including some as young as 1 month, are given dietary botanical supplements (DBS) and teas by their mothers, according to a study published online May 2 in Pediatrics.

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Mortality Drops Despite Lack of Emergency Medical Team

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the absence of a pediatric medical emergency team (PMET), researchers at a Canadian hospital found a decrease in hospital mortality over time, a finding they attribute less to their lack of a PMET than to the limitations of before-and-after study designs; their research has been published in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Children Infected With HIV Perinatally Faring Well

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Most children with perinatal HIV infection are achieving virologic suppression and have normal CD4 lymphocyte counts, according to a study published online March 9 in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.

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Maternal Age Is One Predictor of Child's Poor Development

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal age below 20 years at the time of birth is one of a number of factors that may predict a child's poor development, according to a study published online May 2 in Pediatrics.

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Eating Family Meals May Improve Youth Dietary Habits

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents sharing three or more family meals per week are more likely to be in the normal weight range and have healthy dietary and eating patterns, according to a review published online May 2 in Pediatrics.

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