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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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May 2011 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: June 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Stress and Abuse Not Linked to Multiple Sclerosis

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Stress at home in adulthood and physical or sexual abuse in childhood or adolescence are not associated with the development of multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published in the May 31 issue of Neurology.

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Phone Counseling Improves Outcomes in Diabetes Patients

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Telephone-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) coupled with a walking program may not improve A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and depression, but it appears to improve other important outcomes, according to research published online April 6 in Medical Care.

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Health-Related Quality of Life Lower in Arthritis Sufferers

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with arthritis report lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than those without the condition, according to research published online April 29 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Peripheral Nerve Injury May Cause Substantial Disability

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with peripheral upper-extremity nerve injury may have substantial disability and pain at more than six months following the injury, according to a study published in the May 18 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Lateral Violence Affects Health Care Work Environment

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Lateral violence creates an unpleasant work environment affecting nurses, patients, and the health care organization, and, as such, health care centers should educate their nursing staff to identify lateral violence and adopt measures to eliminate it, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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More Psychiatrists Believe in Clinical Value of Placebos

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatrists are more likely than nonpsychiatrists to prescribe subtherapeutic doses of medication and believe in the clinical value of placebos, according to a study published in the April issue of the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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Cultural Participation Linked to Better Health Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is gender-dependent association between cultural activities (both receptive and creative) and good health, satisfaction with life, and low anxiety and depression scores, according to a study published online May 23 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Depression Drug Combos Not Superior to Monotherapy

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Response and remission rates do not seem to differ between two antidepressant drug combinations and monotherapy with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor; however, there may be more serious adverse events with a drug combination, according to a study published online May 2 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Access to Medical Records Not Linked to Increased Anxiety

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Providing cancer patients with full access to their medical records may increase their satisfaction without increasing anxiety, according to a study published online May 23 in Cancer.

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Psychological Distress Tied to Risky Driving in Youth

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Psychological distress among young novice drivers is linked to risky driving behavior, according to a study published online May 16 in Injury Prevention.

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Increase in Developmental Disabilities in U.S. Children

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of developmental disabilities increased in the United States from 1997 to 2008, according to a study published online May 23 in Pediatrics.

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Tai Chi May Prevent Falls and Improve Mental Health

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi may help fall prevention and improve psychological health but has been shown not to be effective in the symptomatic treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online May 16 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Looking After a Spouse With Dementia May Affect Cognition

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- An older person caring for a spouse with dementia may be at higher risk of cognitive impairment or dementia than a person who is not caring for a spouse with dementia, according to a review published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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Internet Gambling Ups Access for Those With Gambling Disorders

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- The increased availability of gambling opportunities has drawn attention to gambling disorders, which affect 0.2 to 5.3 percent of adults worldwide, according to a review published online May 19 in The Lancet.

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Violent Death Rates for Infants, Children Have Dropped

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a decrease in the rates of violent death in infancy and middle childhood, according to a study published online April 27 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Binge Drinking Linked With Poor Declarative Memory

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking (BD) is correlated with poorer verbal declarative memory, irrespective of gender, according to a study published online May 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Melatonin Analogues May Help Treat Depression

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Melatonin analogues, including agomelatine, may help in the treatment of depression and may help restore circadian function, according to a review published online May 18 in The Lancet.

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Free Gracilis Transfer in Children Improves Smile

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Dynamic facial reanimation using free gracilis transfer in children has an acceptable success rate, significantly improves smile, and may improve quality of life (QOL) with respect to facial function, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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No Evidence of Skin Infestation in Delusional Infestation

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with suspected delusional skin infestation, histologic examination of skin biopsies and examination of patient-provided samples show sparse objective evidence of skin infestation, according to a study published online May 16 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Physician Advice May Improve Teen Smoking Behavior

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians' tobacco-related interactions with adolescents, including screening and advice, may help to modify teen attitudes, smoking intentions, and quitting behaviors, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Heart Disease Risk Similar in Children Treated for ADHD

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Use of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) agents by children is not significantly associated with cardiovascular events or death, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Atypical Early-Onset Alzheimer's Often Misdiagnosed

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) who have atypical (non-memory) presentations, are frequently misdiagnosed, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of Neurology.

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Early Diagnoses of Autism Increasing in Massachusetts

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Early diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are increasing in Massachusetts, especially among boys, according to a study published online May 16 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Partner Violence Tied to Postpartum Depression

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to recent intimate partner violence (IPV) is associated with the development of postpartum depression (PPD) in Latinas, and may offer better prediction than prenatal depression, according to a study published in the April issue of the Archives of Women's Mental Health.

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Firearm Homicide Rates Higher in Metropolitan Areas

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) usually have higher rates of firearm-related homicides than the national average, and the rate in youths exceeds the all-ages rate in most MSAs and cities, according to a report in the May 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Marital Instability May Predict Sleep Problems in Children

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Marital instability prospectively predicts early childhood sleep patterns, even after controlling for factors such as sleep problems, and eliminating shared genetic influences, according to a study published online May 11 in Child Development.

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Breast-Feeding May Lower Odds of Behavioral Problems

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding for at least four months is associated with reduced odds of behavioral problems at age 5 years in term children, but the correlation is less clear for preterm children, according to a study published online May 9 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Blacks Screened More Often Than Whites for Opioid Misuse

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients on opioid analgesics for chronic noncancer pain are significantly more likely to receive recommended opioid risk reduction strategies than white patients, according to a study published in the May/June issue of the Annals of Family Medicine.

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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Incidence of Autism Spectrum Disorders Underestimated

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be more prevalent in children than previously estimated and are found in children in mainstream schools as well as special education schools, according to a study published online May 9 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Gay Men May Have Increased Cancer Prevalence

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Sexual orientation may affect cancer prevalence and self-health perception, with poor self-reported health perception more likely in lesbian and bisexual female cancer survivors, and increased cancer prevalence in gay men, according to a study published online May 9 in Cancer.

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Residual Depressive Symptoms in Responders to Citalopram

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who respond to citalopram but do not remit report a range of residual domains and depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology.

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Being Social in Old Age May Prevent Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who are more socially active may experience less cognitive decline in old age, according to a study published online April 8 in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

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Autism Prevalence in England Similar in Adults and Children

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adults in England is about 10 per 1,000, which is similar to that seen in children, and prevalence does not appear to be associated with age, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Cerebral Cortex Enlargement Found in Children With Autism

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have generalized cerebral cortical enlargement with disproportionate enlargement in temporal lobe white matter, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Midlife Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight or obese in midlife may increase the risk of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD), according to a study published in the May 3 issue of Neurology.

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Baseline Psychiatric Status Tied to Postdeployment PTSD

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatric status at baseline and deployment-related physical injuries are correlated with screening positive for postdeployment posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Maternal Age Is One Predictor of Child's Poor Development

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal age below 20 years at the time of birth is one of a number of factors that may predict a child's poor development, according to a study published online May 2 in Pediatrics.

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Men Abused by Female Partners Suffer Psychologically

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Men who experience abuse at the hands of their female partners may suffer significant psychological distress, including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidal thoughts, according to two studies published in the April issue of Psychology of Men & Masculinity.

Abstract - Randle
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Abstract - Hines
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