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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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May 2011 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: June 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Operative Time of Day Not Tied to Transplant Survival

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- The operative time of day does not significantly affect one-year survival of thoracic transplant recipients, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Team Communication Vital to Avoid Health Care Errors

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Perioperative registered nurses (RNs) identify communication between the team as the most important factor responsible for near misses or close-call situations that could result in a health care error, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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APOL1 Donor Gene Linked to Renal Graft Survival

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Significantly shorter renal allograft survival is seen in recipients of kidneys donated by African-American (AA) donors with two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) risk variants compared to patients receiving a kidney from a donor with zero or one risk variant, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Most Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients Develop Anemia

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Anemia develops in the majority of patients who are hospitalized for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) is associated with improved outcome, according to a study published in the May issue of Neurosurgery.

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Robotic Surgery Claims on Hospital Sites Not Balanced

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital Web sites in the United States may be overestimating the benefits and underestimating the risks of robotic surgery, potentially misinforming patients, according to a study published online May 17 in the Journal for Healthcare Quality.

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Majority of U.K. Hospitals Offer Child Head Trauma Care

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Although the majority of U.K. hospitals have an established pathway for managing head injuries in children, many hospitals are lacking on-site services to care for a critically ill child, according to a study published online May 23 in the Emergency Medicine Journal.

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Lateral Violence Affects Health Care Work Environment

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Lateral violence creates an unpleasant work environment affecting nurses, patients, and the health care organization, and, as such, health care centers should educate their nursing staff to identify lateral violence and adopt measures to eliminate it, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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Low Statin Adherence After Coronary Revascularization

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients hospitalized for coronary artery disease (CAD) have significantly lower statin adherence following coronary revascularization (percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI] and coronary artery bypass graft surgery [CABG]) than after medical therapy, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Surgical Delay Associated With Worse Prostatectomy Outcome

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Delaying radical prostatectomy by six months or more in men who meet the D'Amico low-risk criteria for prostate cancer is correlated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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More Scans for Back Pain by Doctors Who Bill for MRI

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low back pain in the care of primary care physicians or orthopedists who own or lease magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are more likely to receive an MRI, according to a study published online April 21 in Health Services Research.

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Nurses Working Overtime May Increase Post-Discharge Costs

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Post-discharge readmission and emergency department (ED) utilization costs may be reduced by increasing registered nurses' (RNs') non-overtime hours and decreasing their overtime hours, according to a study published online April 21 in Health Services Research.

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Epidural Stimulation Helps Paralyzed Man Stand

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- A young man paralyzed from the chest down after an auto accident is able to stand for several minutes after undergoing epidural spinal cord stimulation, according to research published online May 20 in The Lancet.

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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Limiting Gadolinium Use May Avert Renal Systemic Fibrosis

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Following the adoption of restrictive guidelines for gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) administration, no new nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) cases have been identified in contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) examinations, even in patients with a low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to a study published online May 17 in Radiology.

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Alemtuzumab May Reduce Renal-Transplant Rejection

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- In renal-transplant patients at low risk of rejection, biopsy-confirmed acute rejection is less frequent with alemtuzumab than conventional induction therapy, according to a study published in the May 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cardiac Rehabilitation May Lower All-Cause Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant decrease in all-cause mortality rates, according to a study published online May 16 in Circulation.

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Most Patients Treated for GERD Attain Remission

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) who are treated with esomeprazole therapy or laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) attain remission at five years, according to a study published in the May 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Hospital Phlebotomy Costs Reduced by Raising Awareness

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Continuously generating awareness among health care providers of the hospital costs of daily phlebotomy can reduce the amount of phlebotomy ordered for nonintensive care surgical patients and can result in significant savings for the hospital, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Obesity Linked to Increased Infection After Colectomy

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity increases the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after colectomy, which is correlated with an increased cost of treatment, according to a study published online May 16 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Tele-ICU Tied to Lower Mortality, Shorter Hospital Stay

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a tele-intensive care unit (ICU) intervention is correlated with reduced mortality risk, length of hospital stay, preventable complications rates, and improvements in best practice adherence, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Surgical Catheter Complications Affect Health Outcomes

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Catheter-related complications for surgical procedures are relatively uncommon, but they are correlated with an increased length of stay and urinary tract infections, according to a study published in the May issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Organ Quality Varies According to Transplant Center

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of deceased-donor organs available for transplantation varies based on characteristics of the transplant center, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Hydrogel Coils Tied to Lower Cerebral Aneurysm Recurrence

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of hydrogel-coated coils (HydroCoil Embolic System [HES]) to treat patients with cerebral aneurysm may reduce the number of angiographic recurrences, but they have no impact on a composite of major angiographic recurrence and clinical status, according to a study published in the May 14 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Laser Saves at Least One Twin in Twin-Twin Transfusion

FRIDAY, May 13 (HealthDay News) -- Use of selective laser photocoagulation of communicating vessels (SLPCV) for patients with twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) show improved perinatal survival of at least one twin independent of the Quintero stage, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Carotid Stenting Riskier Than Surgery in Women

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Women who undergo carotid artery stenting may be at higher risk for stroke than those who undergo endarterectomy, but little difference is seen between men who undergo one of the two blockage clearing procedures, according to research published online May 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

Abstract
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Firearm Homicide Rates Higher in Metropolitan Areas

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) usually have higher rates of firearm-related homicides than the national average, and the rate in youths exceeds the all-ages rate in most MSAs and cities, according to a report in the May 13 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Aromatase Inhibitors Improve Breast Conservation Rates

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with clinical stage II to III estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer who undergo preoperative treatment with the aromatase inhibitors (AIs) exemestane, letrozole, or anastrozole have improved surgical outcomes, according to a study published online May 9 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Poor Cardiovascular Outcomes for U.S. Women

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, women have worse cardiovascular treatment and outcomes than men, according to the Women's Health in American Hospitals report released on May 3 by HealthGrades.

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Heller's Myotomy Not Superior Treatment for Achalasia

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Laparoscopic Heller's myotomy (LHM) appears no more effective than pneumatic dilation for treatment of achalasia, according to research published in the May 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Transvaginal Mesh May Be Best for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Use of mesh to repair anterior vaginal wall prolapse appears to result in better outcomes than traditional colporrhaphy at one year, but mesh is associated with more complications and postoperative adverse events, according to research published in the May 12 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Spontaneous Resolution Affects Cost of Tear Duct Probing

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The relative cost-effectiveness of immediate office-based probing surgery (IOPS) and deferred facility-based probing surgery (DFBS) for treatment of nasolacrimal duct obstruction in infants depends on the rate of spontaneous resolution, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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No Benefit to Epoetin Alfa Bolus After PCI for STEMI

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who undergo successful reperfusion may not benefit from a single intravenous bolus of epoetin alfa within four hours of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Optimal Medical Therapy Often Not Applied Before PCI

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half the patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) receive optimal medical therapy (OMT) before PCI; whereas, approximately two-thirds receive it following PCI, with similar practice patterns seen before and after publication of the Clinical Outcomes Utilizing Revascularization and Aggressive Drug Evaluation (COURAGE) trial, according to a study published in the May 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Self-Image Impacts Pain Perception in Scoliosis Patients

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) report experiencing back pain, and those who perceive themselves as less deformed or have less of a desire to change their spinal deformity have a greater reduction in pain after posterior spinal fusion surgery, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

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FDA Sanctions Wider Use of Carotid Stent

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- More people with carotid artery stenosis are now candidates for the RX Acculink carotid stent, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday.

Medline Plus

Antibiotic Treatment Less Effective in Acute Appendicitis

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of acute uncomplicated appendicitis with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid is not as effective as emergency appendectomy, according to a study published online May 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Anesthesia in Infancy Not Linked to Poor Academic Scores

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Brief anesthetic exposure during a surgery in infancy does not reduce academic performance in adolescence, according to a study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology.

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New Implant Likely to Stabilize Spine After Facetectomy

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Following medial facetectomy, use of Auxiliary Facet System (AFS) instrumentation has a minor influence on flexion/extension and lateral bending, stabilizes axial rotation, and reduces intradiscal pressure (IDP), according to a study published in the April 20 issue of Spine.

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Cardiac Catheterization Useful for Children but Has Risks

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although cardiac catheterization in children has inherent risks, it can be used for diagnosis and treatment of several heart conditions, according to a scientific statement by the American Heart Association published online May 4 in Circulation.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Better After Adenotonsillectomy

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- In children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), sleep-disordered breathing improves after adenotonsillectomy possibly due to decreases in the sympathetic activity of the autonomic nervous system, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Condition-Specific Comorbidity Index May Improve Accuracy

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- A condition-specific comorbidity index may be significantly better than the commonly used Deyo Comorbidity Index for adjusting mortality, morbidities, and hospital disposition measures, according to a study published in the April 20 issue of Spine.

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Radical Prostatectomy Beats Watchful Waiting at 15 Years

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- After 15 years, radical prostatectomy appears to be associated with a reduction in the rate of death from prostate cancer as compared to watchful waiting, according to a study published in the May 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Significant Reduction in U.S. Coronary Bypass Rates

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) utilization rates in the United States decreased significantly between 2001 and 2008, but percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) utilization rates remained unchanged, according to a study published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Scoliosis Surgery Has More Risks, Benefits for Elderly

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who undergo surgery for scoliosis have an increased risk of complications but may experience greater improvement in disability and pain than younger patients, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Mortality Drops Despite Lack of Emergency Medical Team

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Despite the absence of a pediatric medical emergency team (PMET), researchers at a Canadian hospital found a decrease in hospital mortality over time, a finding they attribute less to their lack of a PMET than to the limitations of before-and-after study designs; their research has been published in the May issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Mild Histological Injury After Allogenic Renal Transplant

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Histological changes in the first five years after allogenic renal transplantation are generally mild, and are less severe than previously reported, according to a study published in the April issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Total Disc Replacement Viable Alternative to Arthrodesis

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Lumbar total disc arthroplasty is a viable alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of two-level degenerative disc disease, according to a study published in the April 20 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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