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Category: Geriatrics | Monthly Briefing

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May 2011 Briefing - Geriatrics

Last Updated: June 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Geriatrics for May 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

BMD and FRAX Score Tied to Fracture Risk in Diabetes

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), bone mineral density (BMD) T score and age or World Health Organization Fracture Risk Algorithm (FRAX) score are associated with increased fracture risk, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Effect Estimates May Be Inflated in Biomarker Studies

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Biomarker effects are often overestimated in highly cited studies compared to the effects reported in subsequent meta-analyses of the same associations, according to a review published in the June 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Solesta Gel Approved for Fecal Incontinence

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Solesta gel has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat fecal incontinence in adults after other therapies have failed.

fecal incontinence

Dificid Approved to Treat C. diff Diarrhea

TUESDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Dificid (fidaxomicin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile infection.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Health-Related Quality of Life Lower in Arthritis Sufferers

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with arthritis report lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL) than those without the condition, according to research published online April 29 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Most Intracerebral Hemorrhage Patients Develop Anemia

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Anemia develops in the majority of patients who are hospitalized for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) is associated with improved outcome, according to a study published in the May issue of Neurosurgery.

Abstract
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Changes in Sleep Duration May Impair Cognitive Function

FRIDAY, May 27 (HealthDay News) -- Adverse changes in sleep duration -- too little or too much sleep -- in middle-aged people may have a detrimental effect on their cognitive function, according to research published in the May 1 issue of SLEEP.

Abstract
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Polypills May Reduce Blood Pressure and LDL Cholesterol

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of combination cardiovascular medications, or polypills, is associated with significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, according to a study published online May 25 in PLoS One.

Abstract
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Surgical Delay Associated With Worse Prostatectomy Outcome

THURSDAY, May 26 (HealthDay News) -- Delaying radical prostatectomy by six months or more in men who meet the D'Amico low-risk criteria for prostate cancer is correlated with worse outcomes, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

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More Psychiatrists Believe in Clinical Value of Placebos

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Psychiatrists are more likely than nonpsychiatrists to prescribe subtherapeutic doses of medication and believe in the clinical value of placebos, according to a study published in the April issue of the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry.

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Contact With Drug Industry Linked to Positive Attitudes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- The extent of contact that medical students have with the pharmaceutical industry is associated with positive attitudes about marketing, according to a review published online May 24 in PLoS Medicine.

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More Scans for Back Pain by Doctors Who Bill for MRI

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with low back pain in the care of primary care physicians or orthopedists who own or lease magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment are more likely to receive an MRI, according to a study published online April 21 in Health Services Research.

Abstract
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Patient Navigation May Boost Colorectal Cancer Screening

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patient navigators may help increase rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening among ethnically diverse patients, particularly non-English speaking and black patients, according to a study published in the May 23 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Excessive Calcium Intake Does Not Lower Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing calcium intake above a satisfactory level is not associated with a further reduction of osteoporotic fracture rates in women, according to a study published online May 24 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Brisk Walking May Lower Prostate CA Progression Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Brisk walking may help slow disease progression in men diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer, according to a study published online May 24 in Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Cultural Participation Linked to Better Health Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- There is gender-dependent association between cultural activities (both receptive and creative) and good health, satisfaction with life, and low anxiety and depression scores, according to a study published online May 23 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

Abstract
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Elevated Copeptin Linked to Mortality Risk in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among elderly patients with heart failure, elevated concentrations of copeptin alone or in combination with elevated concentrations of N-terminal fragment of the precursor to B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) are correlated with increased all-cause mortality risk, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Fish Cooking Method Affects Heart Failure Risk in Women

WEDNESDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increased consumption of baked or broiled fish and decreased intake of fried fish may reduce incident heart failure risk in postmenopausal women, according to a study published online May 24 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Abstract
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Patient Outcomes Tied to Primary Care Workforce

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) --A higher level of primary care physician workforce is associated with favorable patient outcomes, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation Tied to Increased Mortality

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Women with new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) may have an increased risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and noncardiovascular mortality, according to a study published May 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Heart-Friendly Fatty Acids Linked to Prostate Cancer

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of the ω-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid may increase the risk of high-grade prostate cancer; whereas, high levels of trans-fatty acids (TFAs) may reduce the risk, according to a study published online April 24 in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Abstract
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Vascular Disease May Increase Stroke or Death Risk in A-Fib

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Vascular disease, such as peripheral artery disease (PAD) or prior myocardial infarction (MI), is an independent risk factor for stroke or death in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), according to a study published online April 19 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
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Infection Control Breach in 15 Percent of Nursing Homes

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fifteen percent of U.S. nursing homes receive deficiency citations each year for infection control, and this may be associated with low staffing levels, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
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Erectile Dysfunction Linked to Diabetic Retinopathy

TUESDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Significant erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) severity, independent of age, diabetes duration, macrovascular comorbidities, and cardiovascular risk factors, according to a study published in the May issue of Urology.

Abstract
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Severe Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Pneumonia Deaths

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- In hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia, severe vitamin D deficiency, but not antimicrobial peptide levels, is associated with increased 30-day mortality, according to a study published in the May issue of Respirology.

Abstract
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Type II Odontoid Fractures May Up Elderly Mortality Risk

MONDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Type II odontoid fractures in the elderly are associated with a high mortality rate irrespective of the intervention, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Tai Chi May Prevent Falls and Improve Mental Health

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Tai chi may help fall prevention and improve psychological health but has been shown not to be effective in the symptomatic treatment of cancer and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to a study published online May 16 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Abstract
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Selenium Has Modest Benefits for Plasma Lipid Levels

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium supplementation appears to modestly benefit plasma lipid levels among individuals with relatively low selenium status, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Many Medical Students Lack Confidence in Medical Law

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of medical students lack confidence in their knowledge and skills across many areas of medical law, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Abstract
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Looking After a Spouse With Dementia May Affect Cognition

FRIDAY, May 20 (HealthDay News) -- An older person caring for a spouse with dementia may be at higher risk of cognitive impairment or dementia than a person who is not caring for a spouse with dementia, according to a review published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Abstract
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Nerve Blockade May Reduce Acute Pain After Hip Surgery

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nerve blockade may be effective for reducing acute pain after hip fracture, but evidence is lacking for most other pain management interventions, according to a review published online May 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Cardiac Rehabilitation May Lower All-Cause Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Participation in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant decrease in all-cause mortality rates, according to a study published online May 16 in Circulation.

Abstract
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Most Nondermatologist Lesion Referrals Are Nonmalignant

WEDNESDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Nondermatologist referrals for skin malignancies include mainly noncancerous lesions, but consulting dermatologists are better able to identify incident malignant lesions in addition to the primary lesion of concern, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Atypical Early-Onset Alzheimer's Often Misdiagnosed

TUESDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) who have atypical (non-memory) presentations, are frequently misdiagnosed, according to a study published in the May 17 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Surgical Catheter Complications Affect Health Outcomes

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Catheter-related complications for surgical procedures are relatively uncommon, but they are correlated with an increased length of stay and urinary tract infections, according to a study published in the May issue of The Journal of Urology.

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No Clear Evidence for Role of Selenium in Cancer Prevention

MONDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Selenium exposure has no clear effect on cancer incidence, and supplementation does not seem to prevent cancer, according to a review published online May 11 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
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Poor Sleep Quality Linked to Worse Glucose Control

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Early-middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes show an association between poor sleep quality and higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and estimated insulin resistance, according to a study published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Pulsed Electrical Stimuli No Help for Knee Osteoarthritis

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Use of pulsed electrical stimulation (PES) provides no benefit over placebo for symptomatic management of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, according to a study published in the May issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Trial Participation Feasible for Elderly CRC Patients

THURSDAY, May 12 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly and frail patients with colorectal cancer can participate in randomized controlled trials with appropriate design, including reduced drug dosing, according to a study published online May 12 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Coffee May Lower Breast Cancer Risk in Older Women

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- A high daily intake of coffee is associated with a significant decrease in the risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer in postmenopausal women, according to a study published online May 11 in Breast Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Medical Education Participants Recognize Funding Bias

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Although most medical professionals believe that commercial funding of continuing medical education (CME) introduces bias, most are not willing to pay higher fees to offset or eliminate such funding sources, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Heart Failure Linked to Higher Osteoporotic Fracture Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Heart failure is associated with an increased risk for vertebral compression fracture (VCF), and more than half of those with VCF have multiple fractures, according to a study published online May 10 in Circulation: Heart Failure.

Abstract
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Limited Evidence Exists for Alzheimer's Risk Factors

WEDNESDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- The existing evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions about the association of any modifiable factor with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online May 9 in the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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NSAIDs May Increase Cardio Risk in MI Patients

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with prior myocardial infarction (MI), even short-term treatment with most nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with an increased risk of recurrent MI and death, according to a study published online May 9 in Circulation.

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Cognitive Impairment Common in Oldest Old Women

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- A substantial number of oldest old women, an increasing demographic, have some degree of cognitive impairment, according to research published in the May issue of the Archives of Neurology.

Abstract
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Colonoscopy Repeated Too Soon in Many Older Adults

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Screening colonoscopy may be overused in average-risk older adults, and those with better life expectancies are less likely to experience a net burden from colorectal cancer screening and follow-up than those whose life expectancies are low, according to two articles published online May 9 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Goodwin
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Abstract - Kistler
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Fourteen Percent of Ischemic Strokes Are Wake-Up Strokes

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Wake-up strokes constitute a substantial percentage of all strokes and cannot be easily distinguished from non-wake-up strokes, according to a study published in the May 10 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Residual Depressive Symptoms in Responders to Citalopram

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who respond to citalopram but do not remit report a range of residual domains and depressive symptoms, according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology.

Abstract
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NSAIDs, Aspirin May Increase Risk of Diverticulitis

MONDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Men who regularly use aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may have an increased risk of diverticulitis and diverticular bleeding, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

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Calcium Supplementation Inadequate in Elderly

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary calcium intake is lower in the elderly and, despite increased frequency of supplemental calcium use, this cohort does not meet the recommended adequate intake (AI) of calcium, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Ultrasound Viable Option to Radiography in Acute Dyspnea

FRIDAY, May 6 (HealthDay News) -- For most pulmonary diseases causing dyspnea, ultrasonography and radiography demonstrate high concordance, but ultrasound is more accurate at identifying free pleural effusion, according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Aneurysmal Rupture Triggers Include Drinking Coffee

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Eight triggers that increase the risk of aneurysmal rupture have been identified, including drinking coffee and vigorous physical exercise, according to a study published online May 5 in Stroke.

Abstract
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Being Social in Old Age May Prevent Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who are more socially active may experience less cognitive decline in old age, according to a study published online April 8 in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society.

Abstract

High Cost of Care for Patients With Atrial Fibrillation

THURSDAY, May 5 (HealthDay News) -- Medical costs are higher for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) compared with controls, due to increased inpatient and outpatient costs, according to a study published online May 3 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
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Individualized Guidelines May Improve Quality of Care

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Individualized guidelines that calculate the risk reduction expected from treatment, and which rank individuals in order of decreasing expected benefit, may be useful for increasing the quality and reducing the cost of care, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Urinary Sodium Excretion Linked to Higher Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Lower sodium excretion is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, according to a study published in the May 4 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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β-Agonist Treatment of COPD May Reduce Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) initially treated by long-acting inhaled β-agonists may have lower mortality than those initially treated by long-acting anticholinergics, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Race, Ethnicity May Influence ICU End-of-Life Care

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Racial and ethnic differences that are independent of socioeconomic status may be present in end-of-life care in intensive care units (ICU), according to a study published in the May issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Lot of Warfarin Tablets Recalled

WEDNESDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Bristol-Myers Squibb is voluntarily recalling a lot of warfarin sodium (Coumadin) 5 mg tablets after a tablet from one bottle was discovered to have a higher potency than it should, according to a safety alert posted by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Scoliosis Surgery Has More Risks, Benefits for Elderly

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients who undergo surgery for scoliosis have an increased risk of complications but may experience greater improvement in disability and pain than younger patients, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Midlife Obesity Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

TUESDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight or obese in midlife may increase the risk of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD), according to a study published in the May 3 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
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Men Abused by Female Partners Suffer Psychologically

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Men who experience abuse at the hands of their female partners may suffer significant psychological distress, including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidal thoughts, according to two studies published in the April issue of Psychology of Men & Masculinity.

Abstract - Randle
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Abstract - Hines
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Acupuncture Found to Relieve Hot Flashes in Men

MONDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture appears to be quite effective at relieving the hot flashes that are a common side effect of androgen ablation therapy (AAT) in men with prostate cancer, according to research published in the April 1 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.

Abstract
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