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American Society of Clinical Oncology, June 3-7, 2011

Last Updated: June 10, 2011.

 

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The 47th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology was held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago and attracted more than 30,000 participants from around the world, including scientists, physicians, and allied health professionals. The conference featured the latest advances in clinical cancer research, with presentations focusing on patient and survivor care. Topics covered in presentations included cancer-related complications, quality-of-life management, and end-of-life care.

In one study, Mara Vitolins, M.D., of the Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., and colleagues found that venlafaxine or soy protein did not have a significant effect on hot flash symptom severity or quality of life in androgen-deprived men. The investigators randomized 120 androgen-deprived men to one of four daily regimens (2x2 factorial design) for 12 weeks: placebo and casein protein, soy protein and placebo, venlafaxine and casein protein, or soy plus venlafaxine.

"Venlafaxine and/or soy protein, in combination or as separate treatments, do not seem to be highly effective in treating vasomotor symptoms in men undergoing hormone ablation treatment for prostate cancer," Vitolins said.

The investigators also found a strong placebo effect -- a 55 percent decrease in hot flash symptom severity score in the group that received placebo and casein protein powder.

"Another interesting finding was that we saw a reduction in hot flash symptoms among the two study arms undergoing treatment with venlafaxine early on, but that did not last and that may have been because the participants became noncompliant with the treatment," Vitolins said. "Potentially, the dose of venlafaxine at 75 mg per day (extended release) may have been too high which caused poorer compliance to these treatments, and perhaps that resulted in the lack of improvement in vasomotor symptoms and quality of life."

Abstract No. 82085

In the CLASSIC study, Yung Jue Bang, Ph.D., of the Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea, and colleagues found that adjuvant chemotherapy with capecitabine and oxaliplatin (XELOX) was superior to observation among patients with gastric cancer following D2 gastrectomy. The investigators randomized 1,035 patients with stage II to III gastric carcinoma, who received D2 lymph node dissection, to eight cycles of XELOX chemotherapy or observation. The investigators found that the three-year disease-free survival, the primary end point of the study, improved from 60 to 74 percent.

"We expect that this becomes standard of care for advanced gastric cancer to reduce recurrences and to improve the cure rate. Adjuvant XELOX will be the backbone of future study incorporating targeted agent," Bang said. "D2 lymph node dissection is standard of care in Asia and is recommended in Europe for the surgical resection of advanced gastric cancer. This technique is not commonly employed in the United States, where postoperative chemoradiotherapy is frequently being used."

Three authors disclosed financial relationships with Roche.

Abstract No. LBA4002

In another study, Brian Rini, M.D., of the Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, and colleagues found that axitinib significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) as compared with sorafenib among patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The investigators randomized 723 patients to receive axitinib or sorafenib.

The investigators found that median PFS was 6.7 months for axitinib as compared with 4.7 months for sorafenib (hazard ratio, 0.665). The investigators also found that objective response rates were 19.4 percent for axitinib as compared with 9.4 percent for sorafenib. Hypertension, fatigue, dysphonia, and hypothyroidism were more common among those who received axitinib, while hand-foot syndrome, alopecia, rash, and anemia were more common among those who received sorafenib.

"Axitinib demonstrated a significantly longer PFS and higher objective response rate versus sorafenib with an acceptable safety profile as second-line therapy for mRCC," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with various pharmaceutical companies, including Pfizer, the manufacturer of axitinib, and Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, the manufacturer of sorafenib.

Abstract No. 4503

ASCO: Mutations Tied to Cancer Risk in Lynch Syndrome

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- In families with Lynch syndrome, carriers of MLH1 and MSH2 mutations have an increased risk of cancer incidence compared to carriers of an MSH6 mutation, according to a study published in the June 8 cancer-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Childhood Cancer Tied to Long-Term Cancer Risk

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood cancer survivors have an increased risk of developing subsequent digestive and genitourinary primary neoplasms after the age of 40, according to a study published in the June 8 cancer-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Delayed Chemo Worsens Colorectal Cancer Survival

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- An increase in time to adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with a significant decrease in overall and disease-free survival in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a review published in the June 8 cancer-themed issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Ipilimumab, Dacarbazine Improve Melanoma Survival

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of ipilimumab to dacarbazine appears to improve survival in patients with previously untreated metastatic melanoma, and vemurafenib appears to improve survival in patients with metastatic melanoma and the BRAF V600E mutation, according to two studies published online June 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Exemestane Lowers Invasive Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Exemestane appears to reduce the risk of invasive breast cancers in postmenopausal women at an elevated risk of breast cancer, without serious adverse events, according to a study published online June 4 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

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ASCO: Ovarian CA Screening Tools Don't Lower Death Risk

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- The combined use of a CA-125 blood test and transvaginal ultrasound for early detection of ovarian cancer does not appear to reduce the risk of death from the disease in the general population, and harm may result from diagnostic evaluation performed after false-positive tests, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

Abstract No. 5001
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ASCO: Three-Year Cervical Cancer Screening Interval Safe

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing and Pap smear testing for cervical cancer screening can safely be extended from one- to three-year intervals, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

Abstract No. 1508
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ASCO: Early PSA Test Can Predict Long-Term Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, May 19 (HealthDay News) -- Men with low prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels upon initial testing at age 44 to 50 years are at lower risk for aggressive prostate cancer and do not need to undergo annual testing, according to research to be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, held from June 3 to 7 in Chicago.

Abstract No. 4512
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