Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Pulmonology | Allergy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Childhood Asthma Linked to ADHD in Adolescence

Last Updated: June 17, 2011.

 

Risk of hyperactivity-impulsivity increases in children with asthma, independent of medication

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, particularly the hyperactivity-impulsivity component in adolescence, according to a study published online May 21 in Allergy.

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) component in adolescence, according to a study published online May 21 in Allergy.

Nina Mogensen, M.D., from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues investigated the association between childhood asthma and development of ADHD (HI and inattention [IN]) in adolescence. Data on birth weight, socioeconomic status, asthma, HI and IN, zygosity, and medication use were collected from 1,480 Swedish twin pairs at age 8 to 9 years and at 13 to 14 years. The correlation between asthma at age 8 to 9 and ADHD symptoms at age 13 to 14 was assessed. A twin analysis was performed to assess the contribution of genetic and environmental factors.

The investigators found that, independent of asthma medication, children who had asthma at age 8 to 9 had almost double the risk of having one or more symptom of HI (odds ratio [OR], 1.88), and more than double the risk of having three or more HI symptoms (OR, 2.73) at age 13 to 14. No significant association was seen for IN. Based on the twin analysis, 68 percent of the phenotypic correlation between asthma and HI were attributed to genetic influences (r = 0.23).

"This population-based longitudinal study indicates that early asthma is associated with an increased risk of elevated levels of hyperactivity-impulsivity later in life," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Outpatient Anticoagulant Therapy Benefits PE Patients Next: Three-Year Retinal Screening Intervals Recommended

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.