Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Allergy | Nursing | ENT | Pathology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Pulmonology | Conference

Back to Journal Articles

Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 11-15, 2011

Last Updated: June 20, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

The 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies

The 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies was held June 11 to 15 in Minneapolis and attracted approximately 5,000 participants from around the world, including sleep specialists, physicians, and allied health professionals. The conference featured presentations focusing on the latest advances in sleep medicine and research.

In one study, Francesca L. Facco, M.D., of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues found that sleep apnea was tied to an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The investigators identified 150 women in a medical records database who had received a sleep evaluation by overnight polysomnography and had given birth between January 2000 and June 2009.

"In our study, we found that sleep apnea was associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. However, the problem is that we could not determine if sleep apnea is a risk factor for adverse pregnancy outcomes independent of obesity. Obesity is a risk factor for sleep apnea as well as adverse pregnancy outcomes," Facco said.

Further research will be necessary to determine the interaction between sleep apnea and obesity on pregnancy outcomes, she added.

"Further studies, principally large prospective studies utilizing objective measures of sleep-disordered breathing, are needed to confirm this relationship, and to examine the interaction between sleep apnea and body mass index," Facco said. "If a relationship is confirmed, further studies would be needed to ascertain the role of treatment of sleep apnea in pregnancy."

Press Release

In another study, Charles Bae, M.D., of the Cleveland Clinic Sleep Disorders Center, and colleagues found that six to nine hours of sleep per night was associated with higher quality of life and lower depression ratings. The investigators evaluated data from 10,654 patient records collected between January 2008 and May 2010.

Compared to short and long sleepers, individuals getting a sleep duration of six to nine hours per night had significantly higher self-reported scores for quality of life and lower scores for depression severity.

"It was surprising to see that sleeping less than six hours and more than nine hours is associated with a similar decrease in quality of life and increase in depressive symptoms," Bae said in a statement. "I thought that there would be changes in quality of life and degree of depressive symptoms for short and long sleepers, but did not expect that those changes would be similar in both groups."

Press Release

Nathaniel F. Watson, M.D., of the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues found that shorter sleep durations were associated with an increased expression of genes that elevate the risk for obesity. The investigators collected data on height, weight, and habitual sleep duration by self-report surveys from 1,811 pairs of identical and fraternal twins.

"The key finding of our study was that, as sleep duration decreased, heritability of body mass index (BMI) increased. In other words, we found that sleep deprivation created a permissive environment for expression of genes associated with BMI," Watson said. "Therefore, prolonged sleep duration may reduce the expression of genes associated with BMI."

Press Release

Erika Gaylor, Ph.D., of SRI International in Menlo Park, Calif., and colleagues found that short sleep duration among preschool-age children significantly predicted worse parent-reported hyperactivity and inattention at kindergarten. The investigators used data on about 6,860 children from the preschool and kindergarten waves of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study -- Birth Cohort.

While less sleep in preschool-age children significantly predicted worse parent-reported hyperactivity and inattention at kindergarten, hyperactivity and inattention at preschool did not predict sleep duration at kindergarten.

"Children who were reported to sleep less in preschool were rated by their parents as more hyperactive and less attentive compared to their peers at kindergarten," Gaylor said in a statement. "These findings suggest that some children who are not getting adequate sleep may be at risk for developing behavioral problems manifested by hyperactivity, impulsivity, and problems sitting still and paying attention."

Press Release

SLEEP: Wives' Sleep Problems Impact Marital Interactions

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Marital interaction in couples is affected by wives' sleep latency (SL) but not by husbands' sleep, according to a study presented at the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 11 to 15 in Minneapolis.

Press Release
More Information

SLEEP: Cerebral Thermal Transfer May Treat Insomnia

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with insomnia, frontal cerebral thermal transfer (FCTT) by wearing a cap that cools the brain during sleep may improve sleep onset and efficiency, according to a study presented at the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 11 to 15 in Minneapolis.

Press Release
More Information

SLEEP: Night Owls May Have Lower Grades in College

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Poor sleep hygiene is associated with lower grades among seniors in high school and college students, according to a study presented at the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 11 to 15 in Minneapolis.

Press Release
More Information

SLEEP: Carbohydrate Craving Tied to Sleep Deprivation

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- There is a correlation between increased carbohydrate craving and sleep deprivation and depression in high school students, according to a study presented at the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 11 to 15 in Minneapolis.

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Portable Pools May Pose Submersion Risk for Children Next: Mice Study: Viral-Expressed cDNA Library May Treat Cancer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.