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ERA: Bardoxolone Methyl May Increase eGFR in CKD

Last Updated: June 24, 2011.

 

Estimated glomerular filtration rate improves in patients with kidney disease and type 2 diabetes

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Treatment with bardoxolone methyl can increase the estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online June 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, to coincide with its presentation at the 48th European Renal Association -- European Dialysis and Transplant Association Congress, held from June 23 to 26 in Prague, Czech Republic.

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with bardoxolone methyl can increase the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes, according to a study published online June 24 in the New England Journal of Medicine, to coincide with its presentation at the 48th European Renal Association -- European Dialysis and Transplant Association Congress, held from June 23 to 26 in Prague, Czech Republic.

Pablo E. Pergola, M.D., Ph.D., from Renal Associates in San Antonio, and colleagues investigated the long-term and dose response effects of bardoxolone methyl on the eGFR in 227 patients with CKD and type 2 diabetes. Participants were randomly assigned to receive 25, 75, or 150 mg once daily of bardoxolone methyl or placebo. The change in the eGFR with bardoxolone methyl from baseline to weeks 24 and 52 was compared with that of placebo.

The investigators found that, compared to those receiving placebo, patients receiving bardoxolone methyl showed a significant increase in mean eGFR at 24 weeks, which persisted at 52 weeks. The average between-group differences in eGFR per minute per 1.73 m² were 8.2, 11.4, and 10.4 in the 25, 75 and 150 mg groups, respectively, at week 24, and differed significantly at week 52 -- 5.8, 10.5, and 9.3, respectively. The most common side effect in the bardoxolone methyl group was mild, dose-related muscle spasm.

"Patients with advanced CKD and type 2 diabetes who received treatment with bardoxolone methyl had sustained increases in the estimated GFR throughout the 52-week study period, a finding that is consistent with an improvement in kidney function," the authors write.

The study was funded by Reata Pharmaceuticals; several authors disclosed financial relationships with pharmaceutical companies, including Reata.

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