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Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Text Messaging Can Help Smokers Stop Smoking

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- An automated mobile phone text messaging smoking cessation program (txt2stop) can significantly improve continued abstinence in smokers, according to a study published online June 30 in The Lancet.

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Black Patients Have Slower Transfer for Revascularization

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients who have an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and present to a nonrevascularization hospital are transferred more slowly to revascularization hospitals than their white counterparts, according to a study published in the July issue of Medical Care.

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Incentives Negatively Impact Non-Incentivized Activities

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Incentives may have a detrimental impact on non-incentivized activities of quality of care in the long-term, according to a study published online June 28 in BMJ.

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U.S. Territories Have Higher Mortality Rates Than States

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals in the U.S. territories have significantly higher risk-standardized all-cause mortality rates (RSMR) and lower performance on every core process measure than hospitals in the U.S. states, according to a study published online June 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Higher Mortality in Obese, Low Occupational-Class Women

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- For women who have never smoked, low socioeconomic status is linked to a higher prevalence of obesity and higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online June 28 in BMJ.

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E-Alerts Found to Help Prevent Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic alerts (e-alerts) may be a cost-effective prophylactic strategy to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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In Lumbar Stenosis, ABI and TBI Needed for PAD Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) with or without normal arterial pulses, screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD) should include measuring the ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) and toe brachial pressure index (TBI), according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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African-Americans Have More Noncalcified Plaque

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- African-Americans tend to have more noncalcified atherosclerotic plaque, while whites tend to have more calcified plaque, according to a study published online June 1 in Radiology.

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Integrated Care Linked to Lower Door-In-Door-Out Time

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of prehospital, emergency department, and emergency medical service (EMS) processes of care in hospitals which do not provide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant reduction in the door-in-door-out times of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) requiring transfer to PCI hospitals, according to a study published online June 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Ambulatory BP Monitoring Can Predict Renal, Cardiac Risk

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring, especially at night, may predict renal and cardiovascular risks better than office BP measurements, according to a study published in the June 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Moderate, Severe Diastolic Dysfunction Predicts Mortality

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with normal systolic function, the presence of moderate or severe diastolic dysfunction (DD) may be an independent predictor of cardiovascular mortality and survival rate, according to a study published in the June 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Changes Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Dosing

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended more conservative dosing guidelines for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in the treatment of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, as these drugs are tied to an increased risk of cardiovascular events.

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Liver Fibrosis Tied to Hep C-Related Vasculitis Prognosis

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related systemic vasculitis, severity of liver fibrosis and vasculitis at baseline are associated with disease prognosis, according to a study published in the June issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Simvastatin Tops Ezetimibe for Endothelial Protection

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Simvastatin is more effective than ezetimibe in treating patients with high cholesterol levels, but treatment with a combination is most beneficial, according to a study published online May 30 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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IOM Addresses Prevention of Obesity in Young Children

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Encouraging more physical activity and limiting television and other media use as well as requiring child care providers to promote healthy sleeping practices are a few of the recommendations in a new report from the Institute of Medicine that is part of an effort to reduce obesity in very young children.

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Racial Gap for Stroke Admissions in U.S. Hospitals

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Likelihood of admission to high-quality hospitals, for African-American and Hispanic patients with stroke, has increased from 2000 to 2006, according to a study published in the Spring issue of Ethnicity and Disease.

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Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Approach Feasible for Infants

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) using a feed-and-swaddle approach does not require deep sedation or cardiac anesthesia, and can be used to evaluate aortic arch abnormalities in infants, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Myocardial Damage Found in Asymptomatic Cocaine Addicts

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging detects a high prevalence of cardiac damage in asymptomatic cocaine addicts, according to a study published online June 20 in Heart.

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Tighter Control of Systolic BP Lowers Stroke Risk for Some

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Tight control of systolic blood pressure (SBP) to levels of less than 130 mm Hg is associated with additional risk reduction of stroke among people with risk factors but no established cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis published online June 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Motivational Interviewing May Improve Post-Stroke Mood

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing (MI) is associated with improved mood and reduced mortality in post-stroke patients, according to a study published online June 23 in Stroke.

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Maternal Smoking May Lower Children's HDL Cholesterol

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy 8-year-olds whose mothers smoked during pregnancy may have reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, according to a study published online June 21 in the European Heart Journal.

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Statin Therapy Tied to Lower Prostate Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Statin therapy may decrease the risk and severity of prostate cancer, according to a study published in the July issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Exercise Training Effective Therapy for Patients With POTS

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise training may be a more effective therapy for patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) than β-blockers, according to a study published in the July issue of Hypertension.

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Shorter Door-In to Door-Out Time Tied to Better Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- A door-in to door-out (DIDO) time of 30 minutes or less for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with shorter reperfusion delays and reduced in-hospital mortality, according to a study published online June 22/29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Smoking Tied to Prostate Cancer Mortality, Recurrence

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Men who are smokers at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis have an increased risk of total mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, prostate cancer mortality, and recurrence, according to a study published in the June 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Intensive-Dose Statins Linked to Increased Diabetes Risk

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive-dose statin therapy may be associated with an increased risk of new-onset diabetes and a lower risk of cardiovascular events, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 22/29 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Millions in U.S. Do Not Receive PAD Prevention Therapies

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of U.S. adults with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may not be receiving secondary prevention therapies, despite the fact that treatment with multiple agents is significantly correlated with lower all-cause mortality, according to a study published online June 20 in Circulation.

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Longer Peri- and Preshock Pauses Linked to Poor Survival

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who suffer cardiac arrest and present with a shockable rhythm, longer perishock and preshock pauses are independently associated with a decrease in survival to hospital discharge, according to a study published online June 20 in Circulation.

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Safe Weight Loss Guidelines Issued for Athletes

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss and weight maintenance for athletes and active individuals should be encouraged in a safe way, based on scientific evidence and with advice from appropriately trained health care personnel and athletic trainers, according to recommendations published in the May-June issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

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Early Statin Therapy May Reduce Unstable Angina

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early statin therapy following acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may reduce the risk of unstable angina at four months, but does not significantly reduce the risk of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke, according to a review published in the June issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Averaging BP Measurements May Help Control Classification

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- An average of several blood pressure (BP) measurements should be used to classify patients' BP control, as a single clinic recording is not a meaningful quality metric, according to a study published online June 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Colorectal Surgery Linked to Venous Thromboembolism

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Open colorectal (OC) surgery is associated with a significantly higher risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) than laparoscopic colorectal (LC) surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

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Inconsistent Thresholds Seen in CT, MR Perfusion Imaging

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Optimum values for cerebral perfusion imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) to identify tissue at risk of infarction in acute stroke are not consistent, according to a review published online June 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Medication at Bedtime Gives Better BP Control in Diabetes

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with diabetes, taking one or more hypertension medications at bedtime gives better blood pressure control and major cardiovascular event risk reduction compared to morning medication, according to a study published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Updated Performance Measures May Improve Patient Care

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- A series of 10 performance measures for adults may help improve the care of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertension by providing treatment and controlling risk factors; the measures were published online June 13 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Outpatient Anticoagulant Therapy Benefits PE Patients

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient treatment with anticoagulants may be effective and safe for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) who are selected based on predefined criteria, according to a study published online June 4 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Hospital Surgery Volume Tied to Arthroplasty Complications

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing primary elective total hip arthroplasty (THA) in hospitals with a low annual volume of surgeries, the risk of venous thromboembolism and one-year mortality is significantly higher than in high-volume hospitals, and for patients aged 65 or older undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at a low-volume hospital, there is an associated risk of increased one-year mortality, according to a study published online June 7 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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FDA: Smoking Cessation Drug Tied to Cardiac Issues

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers and health care professionals that varenicline (Chantix) may be associated with a small but increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events in individuals with cardiovascular disease.

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CDC: Small Percent of Youth Meet Physical Activity Goals

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Only a small percentage of youth have met the objective for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities outlined in the Healthy People 2020 (HP 2020) physical activity guidelines, and daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is high, especially among male and black youth, according to two reports in the June 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Flecainide Treatment Linked to Sudden Cardiac Death

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) treated with flecainide develop an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) or proarrhythmic events, according to a study published online June 2 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Increased Risk of Femoral Arterial Thrombosis in Children

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- For children with indwelling arterial catheters (IACs), the incidence of arterial thrombosis is increased in the femoral artery and is independently associated with age, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Widely Recommended

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Depending on age and clinic circumstances, vitamin D supplementation at suggested daily-intake and tolerable upper-limit levels is widely recommended, particularly for those individuals at risk of deficiency, according to the Endocrine Society's guidelines published online June 6 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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High Olive Oil Consumption May Prevent Stroke in Elderly

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- High olive oil consumption is associated with a decreased risk of stroke in older people, according to a study published online June 15 in Neurology.

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Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Recurrent Stroke Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial who have type 2 diabetes may have increased incidence of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events, but the effect of atorvastatin treatment is independent of whether the patients have type 2 diabetes, or metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online June 13 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lengthy TV Viewing Tied to Increased Morbidity, Mortality

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged television viewing is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Gender Disparity Observed in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of inappropriate and uncertain studies for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) are ordered for women by primary care physicians (PCPs), according to a study published online April 23 in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology.

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High Folate Levels Don't Worsen B12 Deficiency Effects

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Biochemical abnormalities related to B12 deficiency may not be exacerbated by high folate concentrations, according to a study published online June 8 in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Mentally Ill Get Fewer Coronary Revascularizations

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Following cardiac events, patients with mental illness receive fewer invasive coronary procedures and have higher mortality rates than those without mental illness, according to a meta-analysis published in the June issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry.

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Clopidogrel Doesn't Reduce PCI-Related Complications

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Clopidogrel pretreatment for patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), with bivalirudin as the planned anticoagulant, is not associated with a reduced risk of PCI-related complications, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Simvastatin Plus Ezetimibe Effective in Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease, lowering of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with simvastatin and ezetimibe may reduce the risk of major atherosclerotic events, according to a study published online June 9 in The Lancet.

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Simvastatin Safety Recommendations Announced

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified consumers and health care providers of safety label changes to simvastatin (Zocor), as the highest approved dose of the drug (80 mg) has been associated with an elevated risk of muscle injury or myopathy, particularly during the first 12 months of use.

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NSAID Use Linked to Increased Venous Thromboembolism Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors (COX2Is) is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Smoking Linked to Peripheral Artery Disease in Women

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the risk of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) in women with no cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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DASH-Style Diet Linked to Lower BMI in Adolescent Girls

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- A higher adherence to a Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-style diet by girls between the ages of 9 and 19 years is associated with a consistently lower body mass index (BMI), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

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Aortic-Valve Replacement Procedures Similarly Effective

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of transcatheter aortic-valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis is associated with similar rates of survival at one year as surgical replacement, though there are differences in periprocedural risks, according to a study published online June 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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More Anesthesia-Related Death in Children With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthesia increases the risk of mortality in children with heart disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, but it is safe for healthy children, according to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Right Ventricle Function Differs With Age, Sex, and Race

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Right ventricular (RV) mass and volumes, and RV ejection fraction (RVEF) differ significantly by age, gender and race/ethnicity in individuals who are free of clinical cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of Circulation.

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High-Pitch CT Offers Diagnostic Accuracy for Children

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Use of high-pitch, dual-source computed tomography (CT) in pediatric patients with congenital heart disease offers diagnostic accuracy at lower radiation doses, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Paroxetine With Pravastatin Raises Blood Glucose Levels

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Co-administration of paroxetine and pravastatin is associated with an increase in blood glucose levels, especially in patients with diabetes, according to a study published online May 25 in Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

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Appendectomy, Tonsillectomy May Increase AMI Risk

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Youth who undergo appendectomy or tonsillectomy before age 20 may have an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) later in life, according to a study published online June 1 in the European Heart Journal.

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Ban on Organs From HIV Donors Limits Availability

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing the ban on the transplantation of organs from deceased donors infected with HIV (HIVDD) would have a far-reaching public health impact due to the existence of a substantial pool of potential donors who could potentially donate to HIV-positive recipients, according to a study published online March 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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FDA: Blood Pressure Drugs Not Tied to Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified consumers and health care providers that angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are not associated with an increased risk of developing cancer.

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Coronary Artery Calcium Score May Predict Mortality Risk

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- A higher coronary artery calcium (CAC) score may be an independent predictor of mortality in patients with diabetes, according to a study published in the May issue of Diabetes Care.

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Fear of Dying Tied to TNFα Levels in Cardiac Injury

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Fear of dying is seen in most patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and is correlated with inflammatory responses, according to a study published online June 1 in the European Heart Journal.

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Maternal and Placental Size Linked to Men's Heart Disease

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Three combinations of maternal body size and placental size can predict coronary heart disease in men, according to a study published online June 1 in the European Heart Journal.

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Timing of Ezetimibe Relative to Statin Affects Plaque Regression

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Ezetimibe may be beneficial for regressing atherosclerosis in statin-naive patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but when added to existing statin therapy, it may lead to atherosclerosis progression, according to a study published online May 16 in Atherosclerosis.

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Hospital Volume May Affect Surgical Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates for certain high-risk surgical procedures have decreased in the United States, which is partially due to increased market concentration and hospital volume, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Clinical Correlates Found for Steatohepatosis Progression

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatosis (NASH) who develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are male and have high rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Omental Adipocyte Hypertrophy Tied to Lipid Profile

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- In women, omental, but not subcutaneous, adipocyte hypertrophy is correlated with an altered lipid profile, including hypertriglyceridemia, according to a study published in the May issue of Diabetes.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing Tied to Nocturnal Arrhythmia

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) who suffer from sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may have an increased risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia during sleep hours, according to a study published in the May issue of Heart Rhythm.

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Late Sleeping Tied to Dietary Habits and Time of Eating

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep timing is associated with poor health behaviors and increased calorie intake after 8:00 pm, according to a study published online April 28 in Obesity.

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