Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Gastroenterology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

June 2011 Briefing - Gastroenterology

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Gastroenterology for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Fewer Complications With NAFLD Than Hepatitis C Virus

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis may have fewer liver-related complications and less hepatocellular cancer than patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but may have similar overall mortality, according to a study published online June 17 in Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Married People More Likely to Survive Colon Cancer

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Married patients with colon cancer may have improved survival rates compared to singles, according to a study published online April 5 in Cancer Epidemiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hemochromatosis Linked to Death From Yersinia Exposure

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Attenuated strains of virulent laboratory organisms like Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) may pose a risk to researchers with undiagnosed hemochromatosis, according to a letter published in the June 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Letter to the Editor

Lower Willingness to Accept ECD Liver Transplantation

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients are more willing to accept a standard criteria donor (SCD) than an expanded-criteria donor (ECD) liver transplantation (LTx), with one-third of patients having low willingness to accept ECD LTx, according to a study published online June 14 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Liver Fibrosis Tied to Hep C-Related Vasculitis Prognosis

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related systemic vasculitis, severity of liver fibrosis and vasculitis at baseline are associated with disease prognosis, according to a study published in the June issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Poor Bowel Preparation Tied to Missed Adenoma Diagnosis

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo colonoscopies with suboptimal preparation of the bowel may have missed adenoma diagnoses, which are detected at repeat colonoscopy, according to a study published in the June issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Combined Virulence Identified in E. coli O104:H4

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The high virulence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O104:H4 may be due to the strain having combined virulence of Shiga-toxin-producing and enteroaggregative E. coli, and augmented adherence to intestinal cells, according to a study published online June 23 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Telaprevir Linked to Sustained Virologic Response in Hep C

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of telaprevir to peginterferon and ribavirin is associated with significantly improved and sustained virologic response in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 infection who have not received previous treatment, or have a history of failed viral eradication, according to two studies published in the June 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text - Jacobson (subscription or payment may be required)
Full Text - Zeuzem (subscription or payment may be required)

Syndrome Caused by E. coli Mostly in Adults, Women

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- A large, ongoing outbreak of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Germany is occurring mostly in adults, primarily women, according to a study published online June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Colorectal Surgery Linked to Venous Thromboembolism

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Open colorectal (OC) surgery is associated with a significantly higher risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) than laparoscopic colorectal (LC) surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Newly Described Processes Limit Post-Ischemia Epithelial Damage

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The epithelial lining of human jejunum is preserved during intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) by rapid lamina propria contraction and zipper-like constriction of epithelial cells before they are shed into the lumen, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Pathology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

NAT Screening May Lower Undetected Hep C in Donors

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nucleic acid testing (NAT) screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in organ donors may be more effective than serology alone for detecting infection during the window period, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Risk of Malignant Progression in Barrett's

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of malignant progression for patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) may be lower than previously reported, according to a study published online June 16 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Coffee May Improve Virologic Response to Hep C Treatment

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients receiving hepatitis C therapy who drink three or more cups of coffee per day are more likely to respond to treatment compared to nondrinkers, according to a study published the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text

Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Rotavirus Vaccine Reduces Cases of Infant Diarrhea

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- In Mexico and Brazil, use of the new monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) is associated with a short-term risk of intussusception in vaccinated infants but prevents a far higher number of hospitalizations and deaths from diarrhea, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

Abstract
Full Text

Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Endoscopic Therapy Effective for Sessile Colonic Polyps

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Large sessile colonic polyps can be managed safely and effectively by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), although previous attempts increase the risk of failure, according to a study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Cancer Survival Rates Lower in U.K. Than Other Countries

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lower cancer survival rates found in the United Kingdom are not misleading, according to a study published June 9 in BMJ.

Abstract
Full Text

VHA System in United States Provides Better Cancer Care

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system in the United States provides similar or better care for older men with cancer than fee-for-service Medicare, although some new technologies are less available, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CDC: Incidence of Several Foodborne Infections Declines

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although the incidence of several foodborne infections -- including Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 -- has declined over the past several years, the incidence of Salmonella infection has not decreased, according to a Vital Signs report in the June 7 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

No Survival Benefit With Cetuximab in Colorectal Cancer

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of cetuximab to standard chemotherapy for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer does not improve progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS), according to a study published online June 4 in The Lancet.

Abstract - Maughan
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Adams
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Late-Onset GI Complications Tied to Childhood Cancers

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) complications later in life, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial

Ban on Organs From HIV Donors Limits Availability

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing the ban on the transplantation of organs from deceased donors infected with HIV (HIVDD) would have a far-reaching public health impact due to the existence of a substantial pool of potential donors who could potentially donate to HIV-positive recipients, according to a study published online March 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Primary Care Providers Can Treat HCV Effectively

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can be effectively treated by primary care providers trained in the Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) program, according to a study published online June 1 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Hospital Volume May Affect Surgical Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates for certain high-risk surgical procedures have decreased in the United States, which is partially due to increased market concentration and hospital volume, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Clinical Correlates Found for Steatohepatosis Progression

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Most patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatosis (NASH) who develop hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are male and have high rates of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Viral Breakthrough After Nucleos(t)ide Analog Therapy

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Virological breakthrough (VBT) is common in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) undergoing nucleos(t)ide analog (NUC) treatment, but is not always related to antiviral drug resistance, according to a study published in the May issue of Hepatology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: June 2011 Briefing - Family Practice Next: June 2011 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.