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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

In Lumbar Stenosis, ABI and TBI Needed for PAD Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) with or without normal arterial pulses, screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD) should include measuring the ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) and toe brachial pressure index (TBI), according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Pallido-Ponto-Nigral Degeneration Affects Sleep

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPND) have severe sleep dysfunction and reductions in total sleep time and efficiency, according to a study published in the June issue the of Annals of Neurology.

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Neurontin Study Deemed Seeding Trial, Not Scientific Study

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Study of Neurontin: Titrate to Effect, Profile of Safety (STEPS) trial had extensive marketing objectives, and may have been a seeding trial to promote gabapentin and increase prescribing among health care professionals, according to a study published in the June 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Normal CT Scan Tied to Favorable Head Trauma Result

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minor blunt head injury with normal initial computed tomography (CT) scan results and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 to 15 are very unlikely to need neurosurgical intervention, according to a study published online June 17 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Higher Prevalence of Autism Disorders Seen in IT Regions

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are more common in children residing in regions which are centers of information technology (IT), according to a study published online June 17 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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Racial Gap for Stroke Admissions in U.S. Hospitals

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Likelihood of admission to high-quality hospitals, for African-American and Hispanic patients with stroke, has increased from 2000 to 2006, according to a study published in the Spring issue of Ethnicity and Disease.

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Tighter Control of Systolic BP Lowers Stroke Risk for Some

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Tight control of systolic blood pressure (SBP) to levels of less than 130 mm Hg is associated with additional risk reduction of stroke among people with risk factors but no established cardiovascular disease, according to a meta-analysis published online June 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Motivational Interviewing May Improve Post-Stroke Mood

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing (MI) is associated with improved mood and reduced mortality in post-stroke patients, according to a study published online June 23 in Stroke.

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Autism Tied to Disrupted Neural Synchronization

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Toddlers with autism display disrupted neural synchronization during sleep compared to language-delayed or typically developing children, according to a study published in the June 23 issue of Neuron.

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New Biomarker May Identify Early Alzheimer's Disease

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Soluble amyloid precursor proteinβ (sAPPβ) may be a useful biomarker for incipient Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online June 22 in Neurology.

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Etanercept May Be a Treatment Option for Dermatomyositis

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Etanercept appears safe with a steroid sparing effect in the treatment of dermatomyositis, according to a study published online June 17 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Inconsistent Thresholds Seen in CT, MR Perfusion Imaging

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Optimum values for cerebral perfusion imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) to identify tissue at risk of infarction in acute stroke are not consistent, according to a review published online June 2 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Childhood Asthma Linked to ADHD in Adolescence

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) component in adolescence, according to a study published online May 21 in Allergy.

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High Olive Oil Consumption May Prevent Stroke in Elderly

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- High olive oil consumption is associated with a decreased risk of stroke in older people, according to a study published online June 15 in Neurology.

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Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Immunodeficient Patients May Be at Risk for Polio

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with long-standing immunodeficiency are susceptible to chronic infection with poliovirus, which may develop into poliomyelitis, according to a case report published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Recurrent Stroke Risk in Type 2 Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients enrolled in the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial who have type 2 diabetes may have increased incidence of recurrent stroke and cardiovascular events, but the effect of atorvastatin treatment is independent of whether the patients have type 2 diabetes, or metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online June 13 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Low Fat, Glycemic Index Diet May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diet low in saturated fat and with a low glycemic index may positively impact biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease for healthy individuals and those with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Women Soldiers As Resilient As Men to Combat Stress

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women may have levels of resilience to combat-related stressors that are comparable to that of men, according to a study published online May 30 in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

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Mobile Phone Users May Have Increased Glioma Risk

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- The mobile phone radio frequency (RF) energy dose absorbed at a tumor location depends on tumor location, phone type, network properties, and conditions of use, and individuals with high mobile phone use may have an increased risk of gliomas in the most exposed areas of the brain, according to two studies published online June 9 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Potiga Approved for Adult Epileptic Seizures

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Potiga (ezogabine) tablets have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat partial epileptic seizures in adults, the agency said Monday.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Age of Epilepsy Onset Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Age of seizure onset may be a significant predictor of cognitive impairment in preschool children with epilepsy, according to a study published online May 13 in Epilepsia.

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Childhood ADHD Tied to Substance Use Issues in Adults

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a significant risk factor for the development of substance use disorder (SUD) in adulthood, irrespective of gender, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Higher Cognitive Decline Risk for Stroke Belt Residents

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Regional differences seen for stroke mortality in the United States are also seen for cognitive decline, according to a study published online May 26 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Reduction in Body Mass May Improve Hypothalamic Activity

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Massive reduction in the body mass of obese individuals may improve hypothalamic dysfunctional activity, as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and may increase anti-inflammatory activity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), according to a study published in the June issue of Diabetes.

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Physical Activity May Reduce Risk of Silent Brain Infarct

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Increased physical activity is independently associated with a lower risk of developing silent brain infarcts (SBI), but it is not associated with white matter hyperintesity volume (WMHV), according to a study published online June 8 in Neurology.

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Rare Gene Copy Number Variations Linked to Autism

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with the presence of rare de novo copy number variants (CNV), according to three studies published in the June issue of Neuron.

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Gene Mutation Links Hormone Resistance, Acrodysostosis

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- A germ-line mutation found within the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway may explain the association between congenital bone dysplasia and resistance to several hormones in patients with acrodysostosis, according to a study published online June 9 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Daily Activities Impacted by Cognitive Impairment

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Mild deficits in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are common in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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RTES Is Safe for Eliciting Evoked Motor Potential

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Repetitive transcranial electric stimulation (RTES) is a safe method for eliciting transcranial electric motor-evoked potential (tceMEP) for intraoperative monitoring of spinal cord motor tract function, according to a study published in the June 1 issue of Spine.

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Parkinson's Disease Linked to Higher Melanoma Occurrence

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a moderately higher occurrence of melanoma, according to a review published in the June 7 issue of Neurology.

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School Bullies More Likely to Commit Partner Violence

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Boys who bullied their peers as a child are more likely to commit intimate partner violence (IPV) as adults; and, men who are violent have increased gray matter (GM) volume in their mesolimbic reward systems, according to two studies published online June 6 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine and the Archives of General Psychiatry, respectively.

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Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

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Antiepileptic Drugs Have Dose-Dependent Tie to Birth Defects

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Four commonly used antiepileptic drugs are associated with a dose-dependent increased risk of major birth defects when used at the beginning of pregnancy, according to a study published online June 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

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ADHD and Deficient Emotional Control Run in Families

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The inheritance pattern of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and deficient emotional self-regulation (DESR) suggests that DESR may be a familial subtype of ADHD, according to a study published online April 15 in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

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More Strokes Treated With Thrombolytics in the U.S.

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- The use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) to treat acute ischemic stroke (AIS) increased significantly between 2005 and 2009 in the United States, according to a study published online June 2 in Stroke.

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Placebo or No Treatment Effective for Headache

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with headaches have an average recovery rate of 35.7 percent when they are in the placebo or no-treatment group of a trial, according to a review published online May 20 in the Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics.

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Winter Conception Associated With Higher Autism Risk

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children conceived during winter months may be at higher risk for developing autism than children conceived in the summer, according to research published online May 3 in Epidemiology.

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Precision Tinted Lenses May Help Reduce Migraine

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Use of precision ophthalmic tints (POTs) may reduce perceptual distortions and visual discomfort in migraine, possibly via a neurological pathway, according to a study published online May 26 in Cephalalgia.

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Blast-Related Brain Injuries May Involve Axonal Injury

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Blast-related traumatic brain injuries may involve axonal injury even though diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be normal, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Functional MRI May Indicate Language Disability in Autism

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may be used as an indicator of language impairment in children with autism, according to a study published online May 31 in Radiology.

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