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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Text Messaging Can Help Smokers Stop Smoking

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- An automated mobile phone text messaging smoking cessation program (txt2stop) can significantly improve continued abstinence in smokers, according to a study published online June 30 in The Lancet.

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Bottles of Tylenol Recalled

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- The manufacturer of Tylenol is recalling one lot of U.S.-distributed Tylenol Extra Strength Caplets 225 count bottles, according to an announcement by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Pain Is a Public Health Issue and Economic Burden in U.S.

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- An integrated approach that responds to all the factors influencing pain can successfully treat, manage, and prevent chronic pain, according to a report published in June by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), on behalf of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Most Addicted Americans Start Using Before Age 18

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans currently meeting medical criteria for addiction began smoking, drinking, or using drugs before their 18th birthday, according to a study released June 29 by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

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Black Patients Have Slower Transfer for Revascularization

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients who have an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and present to a nonrevascularization hospital are transferred more slowly to revascularization hospitals than their white counterparts, according to a study published in the July issue of Medical Care.

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Later Parenteral Nutrition Linked to Faster Recovery

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Late initiation of parenteral nutrition may have fewer complications and encourage faster recovery than early parenteral nutrition in critically ill adults, according to a study published online June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Incentives Negatively Impact Non-Incentivized Activities

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Incentives may have a detrimental impact on non-incentivized activities of quality of care in the long-term, according to a study published online June 28 in BMJ.

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Higher Mortality in Obese, Low Occupational-Class Women

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- For women who have never smoked, low socioeconomic status is linked to a higher prevalence of obesity and higher mortality rates from cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online June 28 in BMJ.

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U.S. Territories Have Higher Mortality Rates Than States

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals in the U.S. territories have significantly higher risk-standardized all-cause mortality rates (RSMR) and lower performance on every core process measure than hospitals in the U.S. states, according to a study published online June 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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In Lumbar Stenosis, ABI and TBI Needed for PAD Diagnosis

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS) with or without normal arterial pulses, screening for peripheral artery disease (PAD) should include measuring the ankle brachial pressure index (ABI) and toe brachial pressure index (TBI), according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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Integrated Care Linked to Lower Door-In-Door-Out Time

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of prehospital, emergency department, and emergency medical service (EMS) processes of care in hospitals which do not provide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant reduction in the door-in-door-out times of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) requiring transfer to PCI hospitals, according to a study published online June 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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E-Alerts Found to Help Prevent Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic alerts (e-alerts) may be a cost-effective prophylactic strategy to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Ambulatory BP Monitoring Can Predict Renal, Cardiac Risk

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring, especially at night, may predict renal and cardiovascular risks better than office BP measurements, according to a study published in the June 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Flu Vaccine Safe for Sunitinib, Sorafenib Treated Patients

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Patients undergoing chemotherapy with sunitinib or sorafenib develop seroprotection rates similar to healthy controls following vaccination against influenza, according to a study published online June 28 in Clinical Cancer Research.

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Evening Media Use Affects Sleep in Children

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Evening media or daytime violent media use may increase sleep problems in preschool-aged children, but nonviolent daytime media use does not, according to a study published online June 27 in Pediatrics.

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Brief Intervention Helps Employees Return to Work

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A brief intervention is as efficient as multidisciplinary intervention for increasing one-year return to work (RTW) for sick-listed employees with low back pain (LBP), according to a study published in the July 1 issue of Spine.

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New Model Estimates Impact of Breast-Cancer Risk Factors

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- A new breast cancer risk model predicts that changes in the modifiable risk factors in a woman's lifestyle may reduce the absolute risk of developing breast cancer, according to a study published online June 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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New Tool Validated for Vision-Related Quality of Life

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- The Effects of Youngsters' Eyesight on Quality of Life (EYE-Q) instrument is a validated and reliable tool which may be useful for determining vision-related quality of life (VRQOL) in visually impaired children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis (JIA-U), according to a study published online June 15 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Normal CT Scan Tied to Favorable Head Trauma Result

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minor blunt head injury with normal initial computed tomography (CT) scan results and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 to 15 are very unlikely to need neurosurgical intervention, according to a study published online June 17 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Prophylactic Heparin May Not Prevent Placental Insufficiency

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Women at risk of placental insufficiency who are treated with unfractionated heparin (UFH) during pregnancy may not have significantly better outcomes than those undergoing standard care, according to a study published online June 20 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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More Pediatricians Utilizing Formal Screening Tools

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- An increased use of developmental tools by pediatricians was observed between 2002 and 2009, according to a study published online June 27 in Pediatrics.

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Obesity in Children and Adolescents Linked to Media

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Media, and specifically television viewing, may be correlated with childhood and adolescent obesity, which is related in part to advertising of unhealthy foods, according to a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and published online June 27 in Pediatrics.

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Higher Prevalence of Autism Disorders Seen in IT Regions

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are more common in children residing in regions which are centers of information technology (IT), according to a study published online June 17 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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Induction of Labor May Not Raise Emergency Cesarean Risk

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor does not increase the risk of emergency cesarean section (CS), when comparing gestational weeks 39, 40, or 41 with a later induced or spontaneous labor, according to a study published online June 16 in the Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Home Stress Adds to Child's Lung Damage by Air Pollutants

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) - The presence of psychosocial stress at home is correlated with increased susceptibility to the effects of traffic-related air pollution (TRP) on lung function, according to a study published online June 23 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Disordered Eating Persists From Adolescence to Adulthood

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Dieting and disordered eating behaviors that begin during adolescence continue to be prevalent in early adulthood, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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IOM Addresses Prevention of Obesity in Young Children

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Encouraging more physical activity and limiting television and other media use as well as requiring child care providers to promote healthy sleeping practices are a few of the recommendations in a new report from the Institute of Medicine that is part of an effort to reduce obesity in very young children.

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Poor Bowel Preparation Tied to Missed Adenoma Diagnosis

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo colonoscopies with suboptimal preparation of the bowel may have missed adenoma diagnoses, which are detected at repeat colonoscopy, according to a study published in the June issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

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Obese Teen Girls Have Higher Nicotine Addiction Risk

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Obese adolescent females have a significantly increased risk of nicotine addiction in young adulthood, which is strongly predicted by family smoking, according to a study published online June 21 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Long-Term Pollutant Exposure Tied to Uncontrolled Asthma

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) - Long-term exposure to particulate matter smaller than 10 µm (PM10) and ozone (O3) is associated with uncontrolled asthma in adults, according to a study published online June 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Glow Gel Enhances Hand-Washing Ability in Children

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The use of glow gel to wash hands is an effective way to improve hand hygiene in children, even without specific education, according to a study published in the July issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Most Young Adults Receive Routine Health Care

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of young American adults regularly seek health care and have access to insurance, according to a survey published online June 14 by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

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Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Approach Feasible for Infants

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) using a feed-and-swaddle approach does not require deep sedation or cardiac anesthesia, and can be used to evaluate aortic arch abnormalities in infants, according to a study published in the July 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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CDC: Expanded HIV Testing Initiative Effective

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Initiatives to expand HIV testing, including an opt-out HIV screening approach used among inmates during prison medical intake evaluation, appear to be effective in identifying new HIV cases, according to two reports in the June 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Motivational Interviewing May Improve Post-Stroke Mood

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Motivational interviewing (MI) is associated with improved mood and reduced mortality in post-stroke patients, according to a study published online June 23 in Stroke.

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Perinatal Depression Care Influenced by Care Providers

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal care providers are largely influenced by internal factors while making decisions regarding perinatal depression care, according to a study published in the May issue of General Hospital Psychiatry.

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Maternal Smoking May Lower Children's HDL Cholesterol

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy 8-year-olds whose mothers smoked during pregnancy may have reduced levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, according to a study published online June 21 in the European Heart Journal.

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Higher Antibiotic Use Among Younger Home Care Patients

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- Home care patients younger than 65 years and those with poor health are more likely to receive antibiotic treatment, according to a study published in the July issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

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Specific Diet, Lifestyle Factors Tied to Long-Term Weight Gain

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Specific dietary and lifestyle behaviors are independently associated with long-term weight gain, according to a study published in the June 23 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Prevalence of Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in the United States increased between 1988 and 2008 in proportion to the prevalence of diabetes, according to a study published online June 22/29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Nasal Spray May Reduce IL-6 in Pediatric Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with fluticasone furoate nasal spray may reduce secretions of interleukin 6 (IL-6), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Perinatal Exposures May Impact Breast Development

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Gestational or perinatal exposure to certain endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can alter mammary gland (MG) development, disrupt lactation, and increase susceptibility to breast cancer, according to a review published online June 22 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Melanoma Screening Advised for High-Risk Patients

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Screening for early melanoma detection should be focused on the at-risk population, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Dermatology.

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Obesity Linked to Lower IVF Pregnancy, Live Birth Rates

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 kg/m² or more who undergo in vitro fertilization (IVF) have a significantly reduced likelihood of clinical pregnancy and live birth than women with normal BMI, according to a study published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Millions in U.S. Do Not Receive PAD Prevention Therapies

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of U.S. adults with peripheral artery disease (PAD) may not be receiving secondary prevention therapies, despite the fact that treatment with multiple agents is significantly correlated with lower all-cause mortality, according to a study published online June 20 in Circulation.

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Longer Peri- and Preshock Pauses Linked to Poor Survival

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who suffer cardiac arrest and present with a shockable rhythm, longer perishock and preshock pauses are independently associated with a decrease in survival to hospital discharge, according to a study published online June 20 in Circulation.

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Safe Weight Loss Guidelines Issued for Athletes

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Weight loss and weight maintenance for athletes and active individuals should be encouraged in a safe way, based on scientific evidence and with advice from appropriately trained health care personnel and athletic trainers, according to recommendations published in the May-June issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

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Early Statin Therapy May Reduce Unstable Angina

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Early statin therapy following acute coronary syndromes (ACS) may reduce the risk of unstable angina at four months, but does not significantly reduce the risk of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), or stroke, according to a review published in the June issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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Vessel Sealing System May Be Superior Tonsillectomy Method

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- The vessel sealing system (VSS) may be a superior tonsillectomy method than other conventional or modern technology-assisted methods, according to a meta-analysis published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Guideline-Concordance High for Surgical Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- The guideline-concordance levels are mainly high in surgical oncology care, but are lower in certain areas, including nodal management, according to a study published online June 20 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives Safe for Most

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARC) are safe and effective for almost all women of reproductive age, according to an American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) practice bulletin published in the July issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Averaging BP Measurements May Help Control Classification

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- An average of several blood pressure (BP) measurements should be used to classify patients' BP control, as a single clinic recording is not a meaningful quality metric, according to a study published online June 20 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Updated Performance Measures May Improve Patient Care

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- A series of 10 performance measures for adults may help improve the care of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertension by providing treatment and controlling risk factors; the measures were published online June 13 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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Food Stores Near Schools Not Tied to Obesity in Students

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of food stores with unhealthful food near high schools in Maine has no significant impact on the obesity risk of students, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

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No Conclusive Evidence for Use of Psychosis Interventions

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- There is emerging but inconclusive evidence that individuals with prodromal symptoms or first-episode psychosis may benefit from specialized early intervention services and phase-specific treatment, according to a review published in the June issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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U.S. Food Allergy Prevalence Higher Than Reported

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence and severity of childhood food allergy in the United States is greater than previously reported, with disparities in childhood allergy and its clinical diagnosis, according to a study published online June 20 in Pediatrics.

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Portable Pools May Pose Submersion Risk for Children

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of pediatric submersion events in portable pools involve children younger than 5 years and take place in the child's own yard, according to a study published online June 20 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Asthma Linked to ADHD in Adolescence

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) component in adolescence, according to a study published online May 21 in Allergy.

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Anonymized Information May Decrease Violence Injuries

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Combining police intelligence with anonymized information from patients injured in violence can be used to prevent violence causing wounding, but not for more minor violence, according to a study published online June 16 in BMJ.

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Physical Therapy Post Lumbar Discectomy May Be Ineffective

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The effectiveness of outpatient physical therapy after first single-level lumbar discectomy is unclear, due to a lack of conclusive evidence, according to a review published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

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Many Primary Care Physicians Not Addressing Weight Issues

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- A large number of primary care physicians (PCPs) do not offer adequate counseling for weight status for adults or children, according to two studies published in the July issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Low Use of Screenings by Sexual Minority Young Women

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Routine reproductive health screenings, including Papanicolaou (Pap) smears and sexually transmitted infection (STI) tests, are underutilized by sexual minority adolescent and young adult women, according to a study published online June 7 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Caregiver Support May Reduce Psychological Distress

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The psychological distress of caring for a friend or relative with a terminal disease may be reduced if informal caregivers receive direct support, although the quality of evidence is low, according to a review published in the June issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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HPV Vaccination Program Tied to Fewer Cervical Abnormalities

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities (HGAs) has decreased in girls younger than 18 years, within three years of the implementation of a population-wide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program in Australia, according to a review published in the June 18 issue of The Lancet.

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FDA: Smoking Cessation Drug Tied to Cardiac Issues

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers and health care professionals that varenicline (Chantix) may be associated with a small but increased risk of cardiovascular adverse events in individuals with cardiovascular disease.

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CDC: Small Percent of Youth Meet Physical Activity Goals

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Only a small percentage of youth have met the objective for aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities outlined in the Healthy People 2020 (HP 2020) physical activity guidelines, and daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is high, especially among male and black youth, according to two reports in the June 17 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Syphilis Screening May Reduce Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Screening interventions may reduce the incidence of perinatal death and stillbirth attributed to syphilis, according to a review published online June 16 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Infectious Patients on Flights May Raise Influenza Risk

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza-like illness (ILI) may be transmitted during a flight, with disease incidence being clustered closely around a passenger who was symptomatic or infectious during the flight, according to a study published online June 16 in Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Increased Risk of Femoral Arterial Thrombosis in Children

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- For children with indwelling arterial catheters (IACs), the incidence of arterial thrombosis is increased in the femoral artery and is independently associated with age, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Widely Recommended

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Depending on age and clinic circumstances, vitamin D supplementation at suggested daily-intake and tolerable upper-limit levels is widely recommended, particularly for those individuals at risk of deficiency, according to the Endocrine Society's guidelines published online June 6 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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High Olive Oil Consumption May Prevent Stroke in Elderly

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- High olive oil consumption is associated with a decreased risk of stroke in older people, according to a study published online June 15 in Neurology.

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Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Meningococcal A Conjugate Vaccine Is Effective

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- A new meningococcal A (MenA) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been found to have a stronger antibody response to group A meningococci than a quadrivalent polysaccharide reference vaccine (PsACWY), according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Rotavirus Vaccine Reduces Cases of Infant Diarrhea

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- In Mexico and Brazil, use of the new monovalent rotavirus vaccine (RV1) is associated with a short-term risk of intussusception in vaccinated infants but prevents a far higher number of hospitalizations and deaths from diarrhea, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Sleep Positions and Practices May Influence Late Stillbirth

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal sleep positions and practices may be associated with late stillbirth risk, according to a study published online June 14 in BMJ.

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Early Childhood Exposure to Pets Influences Sensitization

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Indoor exposure to dogs or cats in the first year of life may influence sensitization to that animal in adulthood, according to a study published in the July issue of Clinical & Experimental Allergy.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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Inappropriate Medicines Tied to Serious Avoidable Adverse Events

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Use of the Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate prescriptions (STOPP) criteria has identified an association between potentially inappropriate medicine (PIM) prescriptions and the likelihood of a serious adverse drug event (ADE) in older people; and, when hospitalized, older people are at risk of being prescribed PIMs and actually inappropriate medicines (AIMs), especially in intensive care units (ICUs), according to a study and research letter published in the June 13 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Psychiatric, Substance Abuse Disorders Common in Homeless

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- A high proportion of homeless people in Denmark have psychiatric disorders and/or a substance abuse diagnosis, which is associated with increased mortality, according to a study published online June 14 in The Lancet.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Lengthy TV Viewing Tied to Increased Morbidity, Mortality

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged television viewing is associated with an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular disease, and all-cause mortality, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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FDA Announces Sunscreen Label Changes

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has announced that sunscreen products that meet modern standards of effectiveness may be labeled with new information to help consumers reduce the risk of skin cancer, prevent sunburn, and lower the risk of early skin aging.

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Gender Disparity Observed in Myocardial Perfusion Imaging

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of inappropriate and uncertain studies for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) are ordered for women by primary care physicians (PCPs), according to a study published online April 23 in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology.

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Mothers' Attitudes Affect Adult Children's Mental Illness

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Stigmatizing attitudes of family members, particularly mothers, can negatively impact individuals with mental illness, according to a study published in the June issue of Social Psychology Quarterly.

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Rheumatoid Arthritis May Delay Time to Pregnancy

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) prior to conceiving may have a longer time to pregnancy (TTP), according to a study published in the June issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Ethnicity Not Linked to Screening for Diabetes

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- In an insured population presenting for routine care, minority status has not been found to be an independent factor for diabetes screening, despite being recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), according to a study published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Low Fat, Glycemic Index Diet May Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Following a diet low in saturated fat and with a low glycemic index may positively impact biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease for healthy individuals and those with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Women Soldiers As Resilient As Men to Combat Stress

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Women may have levels of resilience to combat-related stressors that are comparable to that of men, according to a study published online May 30 in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology.

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Recurrent Maternal Depression May Affect Child's Behavior

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to recurrent maternal depressive symptoms in toddlerhood is significantly associated with childhood behavior problems at age 5 years; but formal child care at age 2 can positively impact negative behavior, according to a study published online June 13 in Pediatrics.

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Breast-Feeding for Any Duration May Lower SIDS Risk

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding has a protective effect against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), particularly when breast-feeding is exclusive, according to a meta-analysis published online June 13 in Pediatrics.

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Age of Epilepsy Onset Linked to Cognitive Impairment

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Age of seizure onset may be a significant predictor of cognitive impairment in preschool children with epilepsy, according to a study published online May 13 in Epilepsia.

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Intraoperative Noise Linked to Surgical-Site Infection

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Intraoperative noise is significantly associated with the occurrence of subsequent surgical-site infection (SSI), according to a study published online May 27 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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New Safety Recommendations for Warming Head Drapes in OR

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Use of head drapes for maintaining a patient's normothermia may present a fire risk, which may be minimized by following recommended appropriate safety measures, according to a study published in the June issue of the AORN Journal.

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Mindfulness Program Helps Reduce Bother of Hot Flashes

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- A mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program may help reduce the bother caused by hot flashes in peri- and early postmenopausal women, according to a study published in the June issue of Menopause.

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Childhood ADHD Tied to Substance Use Issues in Adults

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a significant risk factor for the development of substance use disorder (SUD) in adulthood, irrespective of gender, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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CDC: Ocular Toxocariasis Often Causes Permanent Vision Loss

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Ocular toxocariasis (OT) continues to occur in the United States, and it frequently leads to permanent vision loss that primarily affects children, according a report in the June 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Pre

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