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Category: Pulmonology | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Pulmonology

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pulmonology for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Text Messaging Can Help Smokers Stop Smoking

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- An automated mobile phone text messaging smoking cessation program (txt2stop) can significantly improve continued abstinence in smokers, according to a study published online June 30 in The Lancet.

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Low-Dose CT Screening Tied to Reduced Lung Cancer Mortality

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Screening with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) may reduce mortality from lung cancer, according to a study published online June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Same Donor Post-Stem Cell Transplant Boosts Outcomes

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a higher success rate when the same living donor is used, according to a study published online June 14 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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COPD Rates Remain Stable in U.S. Between 1998 and 2009

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remained stable in the United States between 1998 and 2009, according to a report published online June 29 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Later Parenteral Nutrition Linked to Faster Recovery

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Late initiation of parenteral nutrition may have fewer complications and encourage faster recovery than early parenteral nutrition in critically ill adults, according to a study published online June 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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U.S. Territories Have Higher Mortality Rates Than States

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals in the U.S. territories have significantly higher risk-standardized all-cause mortality rates (RSMR) and lower performance on every core process measure than hospitals in the U.S. states, according to a study published online June 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Home Stress Adds to Child's Lung Damage by Air Pollutants

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) - The presence of psychosocial stress at home is correlated with increased susceptibility to the effects of traffic-related air pollution (TRP) on lung function, according to a study published online June 23 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Long-Term Pollutant Exposure Tied to Uncontrolled Asthma

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) - Long-term exposure to particulate matter smaller than 10 µm (PM10) and ozone (O3) is associated with uncontrolled asthma in adults, according to a study published online June 20 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Increase in Global Proportion of Asbestos Used in Asia

THURSDAY, June 23 (HealthDay News) -- The use of asbestos has increased drastically in Asia since 1970, with 64 percent of global use from 2001 to 2007 attributable to Asia, according to a review published online March 30 in Respirology.

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Nasal Spray May Reduce IL-6 in Pediatric Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with fluticasone furoate nasal spray may reduce secretions of interleukin 6 (IL-6), according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Childhood Asthma Linked to ADHD in Adolescence

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood asthma is associated with subsequent development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly the hyperactivity-impulsivity (HI) component in adolescence, according to a study published online May 21 in Allergy.

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Outpatient Anticoagulant Therapy Benefits PE Patients

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Outpatient treatment with anticoagulants may be effective and safe for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE) who are selected based on predefined criteria, according to a study published online June 4 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Meningococcal A Conjugate Vaccine Is Effective

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- A new meningococcal A (MenA) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been found to have a stronger antibody response to group A meningococci than a quadrivalent polysaccharide reference vaccine (PsACWY), according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Mortality Risk Linked to Use of Mist Inhaler

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) - Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who use a tiotropium mist inhaler may have an increased risk of mortality, according to a review published online June 14 in BMJ.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Photodynamic Therapy Effective in Mesothelioma

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are treated with radical pleurectomy (RP) and intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) have improved overall survival compared to those treated with modified extrapleural pneumonectomy (MEPP), according to a study published in the June issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

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Cancer Survival Rates Lower in U.K. Than Other Countries

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Lower cancer survival rates found in the United Kingdom are not misleading, according to a study published June 9 in BMJ.

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New Diagnostic Strategy for Patients With Suspected PE

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- A proposed diagnostic strategy combines clinical assessment, D-dimer testing, ultrasonography, and lung scan to give a noninvasive diagnosis for the majority of outpatients with suspected pulmonary embolism (PE), according to a study published in the June issue of Chest.

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Diagnosis of Secondary DVTs Increased From 1989 to 2006

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of secondary deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients increased significantly from 1989 to 2006 in the United States, according to a study published in the June issue of Chest.

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ICU Care by Nonphysician Staff Is Safe and Effective

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- An acute care team comprised of nonphysicians can provide critical care to severely ill patients in a medical intensive care unit (MICU) with no significant difference in clinical outcomes when compared with a traditional, house staff-based team, according to a study published in the June issue of Chest.

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NSAID Use Linked to Increased Venous Thromboembolism Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors (COX2Is) is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

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Smoking Linked to Peripheral Artery Disease in Women

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the risk of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) in women with no cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

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More Anesthesia-Related Death in Children With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthesia increases the risk of mortality in children with heart disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, but it is safe for healthy children, according to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

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Ban on Organs From HIV Donors Limits Availability

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing the ban on the transplantation of organs from deceased donors infected with HIV (HIVDD) would have a far-reaching public health impact due to the existence of a substantial pool of potential donors who could potentially donate to HIV-positive recipients, according to a study published online March 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Sleep Apnea Improvement Maintained After Weight Loss

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Obese men with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea who followed a very low energy diet may maintain their initial improvements one year later, according to a study published online June 1 in BMJ.

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Hospital Volume May Affect Surgical Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates for certain high-risk surgical procedures have decreased in the United States, which is partially due to increased market concentration and hospital volume, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Corticosteroids May Shorten Pneumonia Hospital Stay

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Non-immunocompromised patients with community-acquired pneumonia treated with intravenous dexamethasone in addition to antibiotic therapy may have a shorter hospital stay, according to a study published online June 1 in The Lancet.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing Tied to Nocturnal Arrhythmia

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) who suffer from sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) may have an increased risk of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmia during sleep hours, according to a study published in the May issue of Heart Rhythm.

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