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Category: Surgery | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Surgery

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Surgery for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pain Is a Public Health Issue and Economic Burden in U.S.

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- An integrated approach that responds to all the factors influencing pain can successfully treat, manage, and prevent chronic pain, according to a report published in June by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), on behalf of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Report

Same Donor Post-Stem Cell Transplant Boosts Outcomes

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a higher success rate when the same living donor is used, according to a study published online June 14 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Black Patients Have Slower Transfer for Revascularization

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Black patients who have an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and present to a nonrevascularization hospital are transferred more slowly to revascularization hospitals than their white counterparts, according to a study published in the July issue of Medical Care.

Abstract
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Parent, Child Surgery May Spur Parents to Quit Smoking

THURSDAY, June 30 (HealthDay News) -- Parents are more likely to try to quit smoking if they or their child had a recent surgery, and are more likely to succeed if they underwent the surgical procedure and not their child, according to a study published in the July issue of Anesthesiology.

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U.S. Territories Have Higher Mortality Rates Than States

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals in the U.S. territories have significantly higher risk-standardized all-cause mortality rates (RSMR) and lower performance on every core process measure than hospitals in the U.S. states, according to a study published online June 27 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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E-Alerts Found to Help Prevent Thromboembolism

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Electronic alerts (e-alerts) may be a cost-effective prophylactic strategy to prevent venous thromboembolism (VTE) in hospitalized patients, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
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Integrated Care Linked to Lower Door-In-Door-Out Time

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of prehospital, emergency department, and emergency medical service (EMS) processes of care in hospitals which do not provide percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with a significant reduction in the door-in-door-out times of patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) requiring transfer to PCI hospitals, according to a study published online June 28 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
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Lower Willingness to Accept ECD Liver Transplantation

WEDNESDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Patients are more willing to accept a standard criteria donor (SCD) than an expanded-criteria donor (ECD) liver transplantation (LTx), with one-third of patients having low willingness to accept ECD LTx, according to a study published online June 14 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Many With High-Risk Breast Cancer Don't Undergo Radiation

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- In response to the publication of clinical trials there was an increase in the number of women with high-risk breast cancer receiving postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT), but no further increase has been seen following publication of evidence-based guidelines, according to a study published online June 27 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Normal CT Scan Tied to Favorable Head Trauma Result

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Children with minor blunt head injury with normal initial computed tomography (CT) scan results and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 14 to 15 are very unlikely to need neurosurgical intervention, according to a study published online June 17 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Abstract
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Induction of Labor May Not Raise Emergency Cesarean Risk

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Induction of labor does not increase the risk of emergency cesarean section (CS), when comparing gestational weeks 39, 40, or 41 with a later induced or spontaneous labor, according to a study published online June 16 in the Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

Abstract
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FDA Updates Silicone Gel-Filled Breast Implant Data

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has released a report that updates clinical and scientific information on silicone gel-filled breast implants.

More Information

Shorter Door-In to Door-Out Time Tied to Better Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- A door-in to door-out (DIDO) time of 30 minutes or less for patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), transferred for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with shorter reperfusion delays and reduced in-hospital mortality, according to a study published online June 22/29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Multidetector CT Scan Diagnostic of Appendicitis

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is a highly sensitive and specific test for routine evaluation of suspected appendicitis in adults, according to a study published in the June 21 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Vessel Sealing System May Be Superior Tonsillectomy Method

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- The vessel sealing system (VSS) may be a superior tonsillectomy method than other conventional or modern technology-assisted methods, according to a meta-analysis published in the June issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

Abstract
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Guideline-Concordance High for Surgical Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- The guideline-concordance levels are mainly high in surgical oncology care, but are lower in certain areas, including nodal management, according to a study published online June 20 in the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Colorectal Surgery Linked to Venous Thromboembolism

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Open colorectal (OC) surgery is associated with a significantly higher risk of perioperative venous thromboembolism (VTE) than laparoscopic colorectal (LC) surgery, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Surgery.

Abstract
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Newly Described Processes Limit Post-Ischemia Epithelial Damage

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The epithelial lining of human jejunum is preserved during intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) by rapid lamina propria contraction and zipper-like constriction of epithelial cells before they are shed into the lumen, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Pathology.

Abstract
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NAT Screening May Lower Undetected Hep C in Donors

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nucleic acid testing (NAT) screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) in organ donors may be more effective than serology alone for detecting infection during the window period, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Physical Therapy Post Lumbar Discectomy May Be Ineffective

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The effectiveness of outpatient physical therapy after first single-level lumbar discectomy is unclear, due to a lack of conclusive evidence, according to a review published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Hospital Surgery Volume Tied to Arthroplasty Complications

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing primary elective total hip arthroplasty (THA) in hospitals with a low annual volume of surgeries, the risk of venous thromboembolism and one-year mortality is significantly higher than in high-volume hospitals, and for patients aged 65 or older undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at a low-volume hospital, there is an associated risk of increased one-year mortality, according to a study published online June 7 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Donor-Derived Lymphomas Mostly Develop in Allograft

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) that are localized in the allograft are of donor origin and are diagnosed earlier, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Nulojix Approved to Help Thwart Kidney Rejection

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Nulojix (belatacept) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent rejection of a transplanted kidney in adults.

kidney transplant

Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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First Ceramic-on-Metal Hip Replacement Approved

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The first ceramic-on-metal total hip replacement system has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

hip replacement

Endoscopic Therapy Effective for Sessile Colonic Polyps

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Large sessile colonic polyps can be managed safely and effectively by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), although previous attempts increase the risk of failure, according to a study published in the June issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Photodynamic Therapy Effective in Mesothelioma

MONDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are treated with radical pleurectomy (RP) and intraoperative photodynamic therapy (PDT) have improved overall survival compared to those treated with modified extrapleural pneumonectomy (MEPP), according to a study published in the June issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Abstract
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Intraoperative Noise Linked to Surgical-Site Infection

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Intraoperative noise is significantly associated with the occurrence of subsequent surgical-site infection (SSI), according to a study published online May 27 in the British Journal of Surgery.

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New Safety Recommendations for Warming Head Drapes in OR

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Use of head drapes for maintaining a patient's normothermia may present a fire risk, which may be minimized by following recommended appropriate safety measures, according to a study published in the June issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
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Mentally Ill Get Fewer Coronary Revascularizations

FRIDAY, June 10 (HealthDay News) -- Following cardiac events, patients with mental illness receive fewer invasive coronary procedures and have higher mortality rates than those without mental illness, according to a meta-analysis published in the June issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Transvaginal Mesh Surgery Restores Pelvic Organ Prolapse

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- Transvaginal mesh (TVM) surgery is effective in treating pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in both pre- and postmenopausal women but dyspareunia may worsen in premenopausal women, according to a study published online May 23 in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Diagnosis of Secondary DVTs Increased From 1989 to 2006

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of secondary deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients increased significantly from 1989 to 2006 in the United States, according to a study published in the June issue of Chest.

Abstract
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Lipofilling May Be Safe for Breast Reconstruction

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- Lipofilling may be a safe procedure for breast reconstruction in most patients who undergo surgery for primary breast cancer, according to a study published online May 24 in the Annals of Oncology.

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NSAID Use Linked to Increased Venous Thromboembolism Risk

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The use of nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors (COX2Is) is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a study published online May 18 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
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VHA System in United States Provides Better Cancer Care

WEDNESDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system in the United States provides similar or better care for older men with cancer than fee-for-service Medicare, although some new technologies are less available, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Smoking Linked to Peripheral Artery Disease in Women

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking increases the risk of symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) in women with no cardiovascular disease, according to a study published in the June 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Aortic-Valve Replacement Procedures Similarly Effective

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of transcatheter aortic-valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis is associated with similar rates of survival at one year as surgical replacement, though there are differences in periprocedural risks, according to a study published online June 5 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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More Anesthesia-Related Death in Children With Heart Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Anesthesia increases the risk of mortality in children with heart disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, but it is safe for healthy children, according to a study published in the June issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Abstract
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Patients' Mobile Phones Carry Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Mobile phones of patients carry more multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria than mobile phones of health care workers, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
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Late-Onset GI Complications Tied to Childhood Cancers

MONDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal (GI) complications later in life, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Appendectomy, Tonsillectomy May Increase AMI Risk

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Youth who undergo appendectomy or tonsillectomy before age 20 may have an increased risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) later in life, according to a study published online June 1 in the European Heart Journal.

Abstract
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Ban on Organs From HIV Donors Limits Availability

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing the ban on the transplantation of organs from deceased donors infected with HIV (HIVDD) would have a far-reaching public health impact due to the existence of a substantial pool of potential donors who could potentially donate to HIV-positive recipients, according to a study published online March 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Occupancy Smoothing May Reduce Hospital Crowding

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Use of smoothing strategies may reduce midweek overcrowding in children's hospitals, according to a study published online May 24 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
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Post-Chemo Cystectomy for Bladder Cancer OK at 10 Weeks

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Cystectomy delivered within 10 weeks after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) does not compromise survival of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), according to a study published online May 19 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Blast-Related Brain Injuries May Involve Axonal Injury

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Blast-related traumatic brain injuries may involve axonal injury even though diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be normal, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hospital Volume May Affect Surgical Mortality Rate

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Mortality rates for certain high-risk surgical procedures have decreased in the United States, which is partially due to increased market concentration and hospital volume, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
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Fibroblast Growth Factor Not Effective in Limb Ischemia

WEDNESDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with non-viral 1 fibroblast growth factor (NV1FGF) does not reduce the risk of amputation or death in patients with critical limb ischemia, according to a study published online May 31 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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