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Category: Nephrology | Monthly Briefing

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June 2011 Briefing - Nephrology

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nephrology for June 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Ambulatory BP Monitoring Can Predict Renal, Cardiac Risk

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring, especially at night, may predict renal and cardiovascular risks better than office BP measurements, according to a study published in the June 27 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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FDA Changes Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agent Dosing

FRIDAY, June 24 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has recommended more conservative dosing guidelines for the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in the treatment of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease, as these drugs are tied to an increased risk of cardiovascular events.

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Syndrome Caused by E. coli Mostly in Adults, Women

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- A large, ongoing outbreak of the hemolytic-uremic syndrome caused by Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) in Germany is occurring mostly in adults, primarily women, according to a study published online June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Increased Prevalence of Diabetic Kidney Disease

WEDNESDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) in the United States increased between 1988 and 2008 in proportion to the prevalence of diabetes, according to a study published online June 22/29 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Generic Versions of Levofloxacin Approved

MONDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of levofloxacin, prescribed under the brand name Levaquin, have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

National Library of Medicine

Donor-Derived Lymphomas Mostly Develop in Allograft

FRIDAY, June 17 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) that are localized in the allograft are of donor origin and are diagnosed earlier, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Nulojix Approved to Help Thwart Kidney Rejection

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Nulojix (belatacept) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent rejection of a transplanted kidney in adults.

kidney transplant

Unequal Care Access for Children With Public Insurance

THURSDAY, June 16 (HealthDay News) -- Access to outpatient care is restricted for children with public insurance compared to those with private insurance, according to a study published in the June 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Life Expectancy in U.S. Counties Below Many Nations

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Most counties within the United States fall behind the international frontier with the best life expectancies in the world, according to a study published online June 15 in Population Health Metrics.

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FGF-23 Linked to End-Stage Renal Disease and Death

WEDNESDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with chronic kidney disease, elevated fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) is associated with end-stage renal disease and death, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Similar Number for Outpatient, Inpatient Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- The number of paid malpractice claims is similar in both inpatient and outpatient settings, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Simvastatin Plus Ezetimibe Effective in Kidney Disease

THURSDAY, June 9 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with chronic kidney disease, lowering of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with simvastatin and ezetimibe may reduce the risk of major atherosclerotic events, according to a study published online June 9 in The Lancet.

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Youth Bear Large Burden of Global Death, Disease

TUESDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Youths between the ages of 10 and 24 years carry 15.5 percent of the global burden of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

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Ban on Organs From HIV Donors Limits Availability

FRIDAY, June 3 (HealthDay News) -- Reversing the ban on the transplantation of organs from deceased donors infected with HIV (HIVDD) would have a far-reaching public health impact due to the existence of a substantial pool of potential donors who could potentially donate to HIV-positive recipients, according to a study published online March 28 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Bovine Serum Albumin Linked to Membranous Nephropathy

THURSDAY, June 2 (HealthDay News) -- Some patients with childhood membranous nephropathy have circulating bovine serum albumin and anti-bovine serum antibodies, which co-localize to form immune deposits, according to a study published in the June 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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