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American Diabetes Association, June 24-28, 2011

Last Updated: July 01, 2011.

 

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The American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions

The American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions was held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego and attracted more than 14,000 participants from around the world, including scientists, physicians, and other health care professionals. The conference highlighted the latest advances in diabetes research and improving patient care, with presentations focusing on treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes.

In the Durable Response Therapy Evaluation for Early or New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes (DEFEND) study, Peter Gottlieb, M.D., of the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues evaluated the effect of otelixizumab on newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients between the ages of 12 and 44 years. They found that otelixizumab, at a lower dose than used previously (3.1 mg versus 48 mg in previous study) was safe and well tolerated, but was not effective at preserving C-peptide at 12 months as compared with control patients.

"The dose chosen for this trial was too low, and subsequent trials will test higher doses in light of results from other anti-CD3 trials, which showed efficacy using doses which were closer to 17 mg of total protein," Gottlieb said.

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In the Autoimmunity-Blocking Antibody for Tolerance in Recently Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes (AbATE) study, Kevan Herold, M.D., of Northwestern University in Chicago, and colleagues found that two courses of teplizumab, an anti-CD3 medication, resulted in improved provoked C-peptide responses two years after diagnosis in patients with new onset type 1 diabetes. The investigators evaluated whether giving a second course of teplizumab intravenously a year after the drug was first administered would prolong the efficacy of the teplizumab.

"In addition, insulin use was significantly less in the drug-treated subjects. A significantly greater proportion of subjects lost detectable insulin production (33 percent) in the control group compared to the drug-treated group (4 percent). The drug was well tolerated," Herold said.

The authors concluded that teplizumab, given at the onset of diabetes, preserves insulin production at two years. However, Herold said, the benefit of the second course of teplizumab was not clear.

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In the Protégé study, another clinical study of teplizumab in type 1 diabetes, Nicole Sherry, M.D., of the Massachusetts General Hospital for Children in Boston, and colleagues found that teplizumab did not reach the combined goal of reducing hemoglobin A1C to less than 6.5 percent for newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes patients and lowering the amount of insulin needed to fewer than 0.5 units per kilogram of body weight per day.

However, the investigators found that 5 percent of participants who received teplizumab no longer needed insulin at the end of one year as compared to none of those who received placebo. The investigators also found that 40 percent of those who received a 14-day regimen of teplizumab experienced preservation of or increase in C-peptide levels as compared to 28 percent who received placebo.

"This approach, overall, including findings from the Protégé trial, seems to be successful in preserving insulin production. However, it is likely that some additional treatment will be needed to avert the eventual decline in insulin production," Herold said. "Future studies are likely to involve combinations of agents. The study results are encouraging because they suggest that progress has been made in modulating the disease progression."

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ADA: Diabetes Prevention Strategies Are Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Lifestyle intervention and metformin treatment for individuals at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes may improve quality of life and be cost-effective, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Abatacept Slows Reduction in β-Cell Function

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Abatacept co-stimulation modulation slows the reduction in β-cell function in patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online June 28 in The Lancet to coincide with its presentation at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Vaccine to Halt Diabetes Progression Unsuccessful

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Vaccination with glutamic acid decarboxylase formulated with aluminum hydroxide (GAD-alum) fails to prevent C-peptide decline in recent-onset type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online June 27 in The Lancet to coincide with its presentation at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Cardiac Risk Factors Up in Teen Girls With Diabetes

TUESDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may have increased levels of risk markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as early as adolescence, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Dietary Support Helps Type 2 Diabetes Outcomes

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with type 2 diabetes, intensive dietary intervention introduced soon after diagnosis improves glycemic control, but increased activity appears to confer no additional benefit, according to a study published online June 25 in The Lancet to coincide with the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Diabetes Prevalence, Glycemia Levels Rising Globally

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a global increase in the prevalence of diabetes, correlating with a global increase in age-standardized mean fasting plasma glucose (FPG), according to a review published online June 25 in The Lancet to coincide with the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Longer Life Expectancy for Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- The life expectancy of patients with childhood-onset, type 1 diabetes (T1D) has increased over time, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: Sulphonylurea Agents May Increase Cardiac Events

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Initial antihyperglycemic treatment with sulfonylurea (SU) monotherapy may result in earlier and increased incidents of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than treatment with metformin (MET) in older patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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ADA: High-Protein or High-Carb Diet Help Weight Loss

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- A low-fat, high-protein (Hi-Prot) diet and a low-fat, high-carbohydrate (Hi-CHO) diet may be equally effective for long-term weight loss in patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, held from June 24 to 28 in San Diego.

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