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Category: Allergy | Monthly Briefing

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July 2011 Briefing - Allergy

Last Updated: August 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Allergy for July 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Stable Rate of Chronic Conditions for Children Born at <1 kg

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- The overall rate of chronic conditions and asthma in children born weighing less than 1 kg (extremely low-birth-weight [ELBW] children) remains stable between the ages of 8 and 14 years, but obesity increases compared to normal-birth-weight (NBW) children; so that, at age 14, the rates of chronic conditions are higher in ELBW children, but asthma and obesity are similar, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Distinct T Cells Tied to Psoriasis, Atopic Eczema Pathogenesis

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Distinct antigen-specific T-cell responses may play a role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and atopic eczema, according to a study published in the July 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Negative Tests Highly Predictive of No NSAID Allergy

MONDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- The negative predictive value (NPV) of provocation tests for hypersensitivity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is high, with none of the patients with a false negative test reporting a life threatening reaction, according to a study published online July 4 in Allergy.

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Child Immune Response Tied to Mothers' Cytokine Production

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal inflammatory cytokines in pregnancy are associated with the corresponding cytokine levels in children at age 1 year, but children's atopic dermatitis is only associated with maternal atopic dermatitis, according to a study published in the August issue of Allergy.

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Severe Asthma Not Linked to Persistent Viral Presence

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory-virus detection rates in the airways of patients with clinically stable and severe asthma are not significantly different from those of healthy controls, according to a study published in the August issue of Allergy.

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Treatment of Syndromes Linked to Spider Bites Ineffective

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Latrodectism and loxoscelism are important worldwide clinical syndromes associated with spider bites, but the effectiveness of antivenom treatment is unclear, according to a review published online July 14 in The Lancet.

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Albuterol Not Better Than Placebo in Self-Report Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Albuterol increases maximum forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) in patients with asthma, but self-reported outcomes did not improve significantly with albuterol compared to placebo inhaler or sham acupuncture, according to a study published in the July 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Associations Found Between Contact Allergy and Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- An inverse association has been found between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin and breast cancer, and a positive association between contact allergy and bladder cancer, according to a study published online July 11 in BMJ Open.

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Prenatal Distress Tied to Higher Risk of Childhood Wheeze

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal demoralization is associated with an increased risk of childhood wheeze among low-income urban African-Americans and Hispanics, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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