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Category: AIDS | Monthly Briefing

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July 2011 Briefing - HIV & AIDS

Last Updated: August 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for July 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

CDC: HIV-2 Infections in the U.S. Rarely Identified

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-2 infections in the United States appear to be rare and concentrated in the Northeast, mainly limited to individuals born in West Africa, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: Sexual Transmission of Hepatitis C Evaluated

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) should be screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV), especially those who engage in high-risk sexual behavior, according to a report in the July 22 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Medical Students Support Right to Conscientious Objection

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of medical students in the United Kingdom, especially Muslims, believe in the right of doctors to conscientiously object to or refuse any procedure, according to a study published online July 18 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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cART Ups Life Expectancy in Ugandan HIV Patients

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) may substantially improve life expectancy in patients with HIV in Uganda, with women having a greater life expectancy then men, according to a study published online July 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Overall Number, Not Concurrent Partners Tied to HIV Incidence

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The overall number of men's sexual partners, not partnership concurrence, is associated with the risk of women's HIV acquisition in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study published in the July 16 HIV special issue of The Lancet.

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Rilpivirine Has Non-Inferior Efficacy to Efavirenz for HIV-1

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Rilpivirine offers a safe profile and non-inferior efficacy to efavirenz in treatment-naive patients infected with HIV-1, according to a study published in the July 16 HIV special issue of the The Lancet.

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Antiretroviral Drugs May Halt HIV Spread in Heterosexuals

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A daily oral dose of antiretroviral drugs used for the treatment of HIV infection may reduce HIV acquisition among uninfected individuals exposed to the virus through heterosexual sex, according to the results of a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study, the TDF2 study, along with the results of a separate trial (Partners Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis [PrEP] study).

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Stress ECHO Effectively Stratifies CAD Risk in Patients With HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Stress echocardiography (SE) can effectively stratify risk and offer prognostic value for patients with HIV at risk for cardiovascular events, according to a study published online July 12 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

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New Regimens Equal to Standard Isoniazid for Adults With HIV

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Novel secondary regimens to prevent tuberculosis in HIV-infected adults are no more effective than standard isoniazid for achieving tuberculosis-free survival; and isoniazid prophylaxis is not effective for improving tuberculosis-free survival in HIV-infected or uninfected children, according to two studies published in the July 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Lopinavir-Ritonavir Treatment Tied to Adrenal Dysfunction

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal treatment with lopinavir-ritonavir (LR) for newborn children of HIV-1 infected mothers who were exposed to LR in utero have an increased risk of transient adrenal dysfunction, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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