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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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July 2011 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: August 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for July 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Testosterone Ranges Set Up for Premenopausal Women

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Using validated immunoassays, reference ranges for free, total, and bioavailable testosterone and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) have been established using the fifth and 95th percentiles in premenopausal women with normal menstrual cycles, according to a study published online July 19 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Abuse-Related PTSD Linked to Poor Perinatal Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes of lower birth weight and shorter gestation, particularly in childhood abuse survivors, according to a study published online July 27 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Abstract
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Mammography Screening Has Low Impact on Mortality

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Despite a 10 to 15 year difference in the implementation of mammography screening, paired European countries with similar socioeconomic status and access to treatment had comparable breast cancer mortality after 1989, according to a study published online July 28 in BMJ.

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Five Years of Tamoxifen Lowers 15-Year Mortality, Recurrence

FRIDAY, July 29 (HealthDay News) -- Five years of tamoxifen is associated with 15 years of reduced breast cancer recurrence and mortality in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease, but it has no effect on ER-negative disease, according to a meta-analysis published online July 29 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Pregnancy-Related Stroke Hospitalizations Rise in the U.S.

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of pregnancy-related hospitalizations for stroke have increased in the United States, especially during the postpartum period, from 1994-1995 to 2006-2007, mainly due to changes in prevalence of hypertension and heart disease, according to a study published online July 28 in Stroke.

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CDC: HIV-2 Infections in the U.S. Rarely Identified

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- HIV-2 infections in the United States appear to be rare and concentrated in the Northeast, mainly limited to individuals born in West Africa, according to a report in the July 29 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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High Prenatal Milk Intake Tied to Lower Offspring MS Risk

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Higher milk and vitamin D consumption during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of adult-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) in offspring, according to a study published online July 22 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
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Lower Mammography Specificity With Computer-Aided Detection

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- Computer-aided detection (CAD) use during screening mammography is correlated with lower specificity and positive predictive value in invasive breast cancer, according to a study published online July 27 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Chemo and Trastuzumab Combo Ups Survival in Breast Cancer

THURSDAY, July 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing primary breast cancer, combining trastuzumab with neoadjuvant chemotherapy is associated with an increased pathologic complete response (pCR) and favorable survival, according to a study published online July 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial

Child's Cognitive Outcome Not Tied to Pregnancy Planning

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Pre-pregnancy planning, subfertility, and assisted reproduction have no adverse effect on a child's cognitive development at ages 3 or 5, and the differences in cognition seen in unadjusted analysis can mainly be explained by socioeconomic confounders, according to a study published online July 26 in BMJ.

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Women Should Be Screened for Alcohol Abuse at Least Annually

WEDNESDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- Obstetrician-gynecologists should screen and counsel women at risk of drinking and alcohol dependence, especially those who are pregnant or at risk of pregnancy; and health care providers should routinely screen all women for history of sexual assault, according to two Practice Bulletins from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract - Alcohol
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Abstract - Sexual Abuse
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Evidence of Occult Metastases Not Tied to Overall Survival

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Immunohistochemical evidence of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastases is not associated with overall survival for women with early-stage breast cancer, and in adjusted analysis, evidence of bone marrow metastases is also not associated with survival, according to a study published in the July 27 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Breast-Feeding Tied to Child's Risk of Asthma Symptoms

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to exclusive breast-feeding and breast-feeding for six months, non-exclusive breast-feeding or never breast-feeding is associated with an increased risk of asthma-related symptoms in children during the first four years of their life, with the strongest association occurring in the first two years, according to a study published online July 20 in the European Respiratory Journal.

Abstract
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Better UTI Prevention With TMP-SMX Than Cranberries

TUESDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) treatment is more effective than cranberries in preventing recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs) among premenopausal women, according to a study published in the July 25 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Personality Traits Predict BMI Changes Across Adulthood

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Certain personality traits are predictors for changes in body mass index (BMI) across adulthood, but changes in those traits are mainly unrelated to BMI changes, according to a study published online July 11 in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

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Too Few Docs Refer High-Risk Women for Genetic Testing

MONDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Most U.S. physicians adhere to recommendations against genetic counseling and testing for women at average risk of ovarian cancer, but less than half adhere to guidelines for referral for high-risk women, according to a study published online July 25 in Cancer.

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Prenatal Nicotine Exposure Tied to Vascular Dysfunction

FRIDAY, July 22 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal nicotine exposure in rats can increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in vascular hypertensive reactivity in male offspring, according to an experimental study published online July 21 in the British Journal of Pharmacology.

Abstract
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Increased Height Tied to Higher Cancer Risk

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing height in women is associated with an increased risk of total cancer and cancer in most sites, according to a study published online July 21 in The Lancet Oncology.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hand Expression Linked to Improved Breast-Feeding Rates

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who hand-express breast milk for their term infants feeding poorly shortly after birth are more likely to breast-feed their infants at two months than mothers who express with electric pumps, according to a study published online July 11 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal & Neonatal.

Abstract
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Medical Students Support Right to Conscientious Objection

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of medical students in the United Kingdom, especially Muslims, believe in the right of doctors to conscientiously object to or refuse any procedure, according to a study published online July 18 in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Abstract
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Annual Mammography Screening Should Begin at 40

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- Annual mammography screening for breast cancer in women should begin at age 40 years, and not at age 50 as previously recommended, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG's) Practice Bulletin on Breast Cancer Screening, published in the August issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Best Performing Hospitals for Women in 19 U.S. States ID'd

THURSDAY, July 21 (HealthDay News) -- The best performing hospitals for maternity care and gynecologic surgery across 19 states have been identified, according to the HealthGrades 2011 Obstetrics and Gynecology in American Hospitals report published online July 19 by HealthGrades.

Report

Physical Activity Tied to Reduced Cognitive Decline Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Regular physical activity reduces the rate of cognitive decline in older women with vascular disease or risk factors; and greater activity energy expenditure (AEE) reduces the incidence of cognitive impairment in older adults, according to two studies published online July 19 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract - Vercambre
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Abstract - Middleton
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Editorial

Prenatal Partner Violence Tied to DNA Methylation in Offspring

WEDNESDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal exposure to intimate-partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy is associated with methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) promoter in adolescent children, according to a study published online July 19 in Translational Psychiatry.

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IOM Recommends Updates in Guidelines for Women's Health

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Eight preventive health services for women should be added to the services that health plans will cover at no cost to patients under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, according to a July 19 report from the Institute of Medicine.

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Triptorelin Tied to Reduced Chemo-Induced Menopause

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- The use of triptorelin to temporarily suppress ovarian function in patients with early stage breast cancer is associated with reduced occurrence of chemotherapy-induced early menopause, according to a study published in the July 20 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Review: Exercise = Less Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is suggested to have a small but statistically significant effect on preventing bone mineral density (BMD) loss in postmenopausal women, according to a meta-analysis published in the July issue of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

Abstract
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Screening for Lynch Syndrome Beneficial at Acceptable Cost

TUESDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Identifying families with the Lynch syndrome could yield considerable benefits at acceptable costs, particularly for women, according to a study published online July 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Child Immune Response Tied to Mothers' Cytokine Production

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal inflammatory cytokines in pregnancy are associated with the corresponding cytokine levels in children at age 1 year, but children's atopic dermatitis is only associated with maternal atopic dermatitis, according to a study published in the August issue of Allergy.

Abstract
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BMI Changes Predictive of Bilateral Knee Pain in Women

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in body mass index (BMI) are associated with year 15 (Y15) bilateral knee pain in women irrespective of radiographic knee osteoarthritis (RKOA) status, according to a study published online July 7 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
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Secondary Seizure Frequency Higher in Anovulatory Cycle

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- In women with intractable focal onset seizures, seizure frequency for secondary generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) is significantly greater during anovulatory cycles than during ovulatory cycles, according to a study published online July 14 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
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Overall Number, Not Concurrent Partners Tied to HIV Incidence

FRIDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- The overall number of men's sexual partners, not partnership concurrence, is associated with the risk of women's HIV acquisition in sub-Saharan Africa, according to a study published in the July 16 HIV special issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Unhealthy Lifestyle Factors Linked to Sexual Problems

THURSDAY, July 14 (HealthDay News) -- Unhealthy lifestyle factors are associated with sexual inactivity with a partner in sexually active men and women, with sexual dysfunction significantly more likely in men, according to a study published online May 13 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Abstract
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Antiretroviral Drugs May Halt HIV Spread in Heterosexuals

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- A daily oral dose of antiretroviral drugs used for the treatment of HIV infection may reduce HIV acquisition among uninfected individuals exposed to the virus through heterosexual sex, according to the results of a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study, the TDF2 study, along with the results of a separate trial (Partners Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis [PrEP] study).

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FDA: Transvaginal Mesh Placement Tied to Adverse Events

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has warned health care providers and patients that transvaginal surgical placement of mesh to repair pelvic organ prolapse (POP) may be riskier than other surgical approaches, with no greater clinical benefit.

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Associations Found Between Contact Allergy and Cancer

WEDNESDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- An inverse association has been found between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin and breast cancer, and a positive association between contact allergy and bladder cancer, according to a study published online July 11 in BMJ Open.

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Changes in Family Cancer History Impact Screening Needs

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Clinically relevant family history changes over time, specifically between the ages of 30 and 50 years, impact screening recommendations for colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, according to a study published in the July 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Gender Discrepancy in Cancer Mortality Rates Considerable

TUESDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Males have higher mortality rates for cancer than females, but cancer survival disparities are much less pronounced between males and females, according to a study published online July 12 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

Abstract
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Early Metformin Therapy Prevents, Delays PCOS in Girls

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Early metformin therapy in girls with low birth weight and precocious puberty (LBW-PP) prevents or delays the development of hirsutism, androgen excess, oligomenorrhea, and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), according to a study published online June 1 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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Clinical Practice Guidelines Underused in Bladder Cancer

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical practice guidelines for management of patients with bladder cancer are not being followed, with provider-level factors contributing to this underuse, according to a study published online July 11 in Cancer.

Abstract
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SEER Data Under-Ascertaining Cancer Radiotherapy Rates

MONDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry show disparities in documenting rates of radiotherapy receipt by breast cancer patients or for investigation of geographic variation in the radiation treatment, according to a study published online June 29 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Prenatal Distress Tied to Higher Risk of Childhood Wheeze

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal demoralization is associated with an increased risk of childhood wheeze among low-income urban African-Americans and Hispanics, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

Abstract
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Maternal Vaccination Tied to Fewer Flu Hospitalizations

FRIDAY, July 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy is associated with a reduced risk of laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among infants aged less than 6 months, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Drug Susceptibility in Gonorrhea May Be Declining

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Cephalosporin susceptibility among Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) isolates appears to be declining; however, cephalosporins remain an effective treatment for gonorrhea, according to a report in the July 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Postpartum Contraceptive Use Guidelines Updated

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The use of combined hormonal contraceptives are not recommended during the first 21 days after delivery due to the high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a report in the July 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Obesity Tied to Higher Risk of Breast Surgery Complications

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is associated with a significantly higher risk of complications following breast surgery, according to a study published online June 9 in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Abstract
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Higher Incidence of OA Seen in U.S. Military

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Active duty U.S. military personnel have significantly higher incidence rates (IRs) for osteoarthritis (OA) than comparable age groups in the general population, according to a study published online June 29 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Abstract
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Prepregnancy Heme Iron Intake Linked to Diabetes Risk

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- The intake of dietary heme iron before pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published in the July issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Editorial

Breast-Feeding Does Not Affect MS Postpartum Relapse Rate

THURSDAY, July 7 (HealthDay News) -- Breast-feeding is not associated with a lower risk of postpartum relapses in women with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online July 6 in Neurology.

Abstract
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Low-Risk Lifestyle Linked to Lower SCD Risk Among Women

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Conforming to a low-risk lifestyle is associated with a decreased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in women, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Eating Disorders Associated With High Mortality Rates

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with eating disorders -- anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS) -- have significantly increased mortality rates, with the highest rate in those with AN, according to a meta-analysis published in the July issue in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Sedentary Lifestyle Tied to Pulmonary Embolism Risk

WEDNESDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- A sedentary lifestyle is associated with an increased risk of incident pulmonary embolism in women, according to a study published online July 4 in BMJ.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

First Trimester Antidepressant Use Tied to Childhood ASD

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), especially during the first trimester of pregnancy, may increase the risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in children, according to a study published online July 4 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
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Lopinavir-Ritonavir Treatment Tied to Adrenal Dysfunction

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Postnatal treatment with lopinavir-ritonavir (LR) for newborn children of HIV-1 infected mothers who were exposed to LR in utero have an increased risk of transient adrenal dysfunction, according to a study published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Personalizing Frequency of Mammography Is Cost-Effective

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Personalizing the frequency of mammography on the basis of the woman's age, breast density, history of breast biopsy, and family history of breast cancer is cost-effective, according to research published in the July 5 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased First-Trimester Prescription Drug Use in U.S.

TUESDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Use of prescription medications in the first trimester of pregnancy increased from 1976 to 2008 in the United States, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Adults on the Wane

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of elevated adult blood lead levels (BLLs) has fallen overall since the mid-1990s, but the highest prevalence of elevated BLLs is found in the manufacturing, construction, and mining industries, according to a report published in the July 1 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vitamin D Supplementation Safe and Effective in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Daily 4000 IU vitamin D supplementation from 12 to 16 weeks of gestation is safe and effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency in pregnant women and their neonates, according to a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

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Around One in 10 Computerized Prescriptions Contains Errors

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately one in 10 computerized outpatient prescriptions contains errors, a third of which are potential adverse drug events, according to a study published online June 29 in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Abstract
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Comorbidities Negatively Affect Breast Cancer Survival

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- The presence of comorbidities among older patients with early breast cancer is associated with either similar or worse overall survival than that of patients at a later stage of cancer with no comorbidities, according to a study published online June 30 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract
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Editorial

Older Breast Cancer Patients Likely to Die of Heart Disease

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Older women diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to die from comorbid conditions, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD), rather than from breast cancer, according to a study published online June 20 in Breast Cancer Research.

Abstract
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Pregravid Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Linked to GDM

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- Women with pregravid cardiometabolic risk factors are at significantly higher risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
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Multiple Sclerosis Not Tied to Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

FRIDAY, July 1 (HealthDay News) -- For pregnant women, multiple sclerosis (MS) is not associated with adverse pregnancy or birth outcomes, according to a study published online June 27 in the Annals of Neurology.

Abstract
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