Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Endocrinology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Diabetic Dermopathy Tied to Abnormal Skin Blood Flow

Last Updated: August 17, 2011.

 

Patients with type 1 diabetes and dermopathy have lower skin blood flow on normal-appearing skin

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The pretibial surfaces of the legs of patients with diabetic dermopathy have significantly lower skin blood flow on normal-appearing skin than in control patients, whereas dermopathy lesions have higher blood flow, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The pretibial surfaces of the legs of patients with diabetic dermopathy have significantly lower skin blood flow on normal-appearing skin than in control patients, whereas dermopathy lesions have higher blood flow, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Alexandra Brugler, from the Creighton University School of Medicine in Omaha, Neb., and colleagues investigated the local skin blood flow in patients with diabetic dermopathy. Using laser Doppler technology, cutaneous blood flow was measured in 25 patients with type 1 diabetes and evident diabetic dermopathy (average age, 51 ± 2 years) and was compared with blood flow in 58 patients with type 1 diabetics without dermopathy (average age, 41 ± 2 years) and 67 individuals without diabetes (average age, 47 ± 3 years). Flow values were measured at three sites on the pretibial area on the legs of each individual, at lesion sites, and at standard sites on the upper and lower extremities.

The investigators found that the skin blood flow at 35 degrees Celsius on the normal-appearing skin areas decreased markedly to 1.1 ± 0.1 mL/min/100g in the diabetic dermopathy group, compared with both the nondiabetic group (2.1 ± 0.3 mL/min/100g) and the type 1 diabetic control group (1.7 ± 0.1 mL/min/100g). Noticeably higher blood flow of 2.5 ± 0.3 mL/min/100g was observed in the dermopathy lesions.

"These results suggest that patients susceptible to diabetic dermopathy have a functional abnormality in blood flow leading to this scarring process," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Large Variation in Reoperation Rate After Colorectal Surgery Next: New Pressure Device Safe, Effective For Auricular Keloids

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.