Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Pediatrics | Radiology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Peak Brown Adipose Tissue Activity Seen in Adolescence

Last Updated: August 19, 2011.

 

Inverse association between brown adipose tissue activity and body mass index percentile

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Peak brown adipose tissue activity occurs in adolescence among both boys and girls and is inversely associated with body mass index percentile, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

FRIDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Peak brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity occurs in adolescence among both boys and girls and is inversely associated with body mass index (BMI)-percentile, according to a study published online Aug. 12 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Laura A. Drubach, M.D., from the Children's Hospital Boston, and colleagues reviewed 385 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography scans for various oncologic indications in 172 patients between the ages of 5 and 21 years to evaluate the prevalence and factors affecting the detection of active BAT in children and adolescents. They also compared the detection rates with those for adults, as described in other studies. BAT activity was identified visually as present or absent in the neck, thorax, and abdomen, based on its typical appearance, followed by quantification by comparing the FDG activity in the cervical-supraclavicular depots and in the liver.

The investigators found no difference between the BAT detection rate in boys (43.3 percent) and girls (45.3 percent), with BAT activity occurring most often in the cervical-supraclavicular depots. The highest percentage of patients with detectable BAT and the highest BAT/liver activity for both boys and girls was found in the group aged 13 to 14.99 years. BAT activity had a significant inverse association with BMI percentile, and there was no correlation with the outdoor temperature or clinical diagnosis.

"Under clinical imaging conditions, peak BAT activity occurs in adolescence, and is inversely correlated with BMI percentile," the authors write.

The study was partially supported by the Eli Lilly Foundation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Adcetris Approved to Treat Lymphomas Next: Half of Health Care Providers Recommend HPV Co-Test

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.