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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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August 2011 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: September 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for August 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pediatric Window-Fall-Related Head Injuries Analyzed

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children younger than 4 years of age or those landing on hard surfaces are more likely to sustain head injuries, be hospitalized, or die in window-related falls than older children or those who fall on cushioning surfaces, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Pediatrics.

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AAP, CPS Oppose Boxing for Children and Adolescents

TUESDAY, Aug. 230 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS) oppose boxing for children and adolescents, and recommend that physicians encourage participation in alternate sports that do not involve head blows, according to a policy statement by the AAP and the CPS, published online Aug. 28 in Pediatrics.

Report

Loss of Jobs Means Loss of Health Coverage for Many in U.S.

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For American adults who lose their health insurance coverage when they lose their jobs, the majority remain uninsured, delay getting needed health care or prescriptions, and report financial difficulties paying medical bills, according to a report published online Aug. 24 by The Commonwealth Fund.

Report

Extended-Release Opioid Pain Medication Approved

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Nucynta ER (tapentadol extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat moderate-to-severe chronic pain in adults, maker Janssen Pharmaceuticals said.

this drug

Higher 90-Day Mortality in New Jersey Weekend Stroke Admits

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with stroke admitted to New Jersey hospitals on weekends have a significantly increased 90-day mortality compared to those admitted on weekdays, but stroke admissions to comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) have similar 90-day mortality for weekend versus weekday admissions, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in Stroke.

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Complementary Medicine Used More by Health Care Workers

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health care workers, especially health care providers, are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) than the general, employed U.S. population, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Health Services Research.

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Pharmaceutical Ads Often Don't Adhere to U.S. FDA Guidelines

THURSDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Physician-targeting pharmaceutical advertisements have low rates of adherence to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and provide inadequate information for safe prescribing, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in PLoS One.

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Elevated 1H MRS Metabolites Tied to Cognitive Function

THURSDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For cognitively normal older adults, elevated proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) metabolite choline (Cho)/creatine (Cr) ratios are associated with lower scores on cognitive tests, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in Neurology.

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Airway Infections Correlate With Narcolepsy Onset in China

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In China, narcolepsy onset is significantly associated with seasonal and annual patterns of upper airway infections, including H1N1 influenza, and increased three-fold following the 2009 H1N1 winter influenza pandemic, independent of H1N1 vaccination in the majority of cases, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Botox Approved to Treat Urinary Incontinence

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat urinary incontinence in people with neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis.

National Library of Medicine

Hospitalization Ups Unintentional Discontinuation of Meds

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with unintentional discontinuation of medication for chronic diseases, according to a study published online Aug. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Carpal Tunnel Patients Likely to Share Surgical Decisions

MONDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients undergoing carpal tunnel release prefer to share surgical decision making with their surgeon, and these patients have less severe symptoms than those who are fully active or fully passive in decision making, according to a study published in the Aug. 17 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Nigral Pathology Tied to Mild Parkinsonism in Elderly

FRIDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nigral neuronal loss is associated with mild parkinsonian signs, including impaired motor function in older adults without Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a study published online Aug. 11 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Moderate Drinking Tied to Lower Dementia Risk in Seniors

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Light to moderate drinking is associated with a decreased risk of dementia and cognitive impairment in older individuals and does not appear to be linked to impaired cognition in younger individuals, according to a review published online Aug. 11 in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment.

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CDC: 2010/2011 Flu Vaccination Coverage Studied

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination coverage among health care personnel (HCP) and pregnant women in the 2010/2011 influenza season was similar to coverage for the 2009/2010 season, according to two reports in the Aug. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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1998 to 2009 Saw Rise in ADHD Prevalence in U.S. Children

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) showed an increasing trend from 1998-2000 to 2007-2009 among children aged 5 to 17 years, according to a report published online Aug. 18 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

More Information

Echolucency, Microemboli Combo Predicts Ipsilateral Stroke Risk

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of embolic signals (ES) detection and plaque morphology can be used to predict the risk of ipsilateral stroke in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis (ACS), according to a study published online Aug. 17 in Neurology.

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High Cumulative Malpractice Risk for All Physicians

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians in all specialties have a high cumulative risk of facing a malpractice claim by age 65; although most claims do not lead to indemnity payments, according to a study published in the Aug. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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AdV-tk Plus Valacyclovir Safe in New Malignant Gliomas

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The administration of an adenoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (AdV-tk), plus valacyclovir, is safe and can be delivered with surgery and accelerated radiation in patients with newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Patient Care Improves With Anticoagulation Service

TUESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- A Pharmacist-Directed Anticoagulation Service (PDAS) improves the quality of care for patients taking the anticoagulant drug warfarin in an inpatient setting by coordinating the transition of care from an inpatient to an outpatient setting, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Antidepressants Don't Impact Stimulants' Efficacy in ADHD

TUESDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- In adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), concomitant use of antidepressants does not affect the safety or efficacy of osmotic release oral system methylphenidate (OROS-MPH), according to a study published online Aug. 5 in CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

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Sleep Apnea Recurs Within Days of CPAP Withdrawal

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), withdrawal of CPAP is associated with rapid recurrence of OSA and subjective sleepiness, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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UVR Exposure From Tanning Beds Ups Cerebral Blood Flow

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during use of a tanning bed increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the dorsal striatum, anterior insula, and medial orbitofrontal cortex, according to a study published online April 11 in Addiction Biology.

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Researchers Identify Causative Gene in Juvenile ALS

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- A mutation in the Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) of the SIGMAR1 gene is associated with the development of juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a study published online Aug. 12 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Sibling Recurrence Risk of Autism Nearly 19 Percent

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The sibling recurrence risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) among infants with an older affected sibling is almost 19 percent, and is significantly predicted by infant gender and having more than one affected sibling, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Compression Stockings Lessen Obstructive Sleep Apnea

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), wearing compression stockings during the day attenuates OSA by reducing fluid accumulation in the legs and its overnight redistribution into the neck, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Epidermal Electronic System Monitors Heart, Brain Activity

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- An ultrathin epidermal electronic system (EES), comparable to skin, can effectively monitor the electrical activity of heart, brain, and skeletal muscle when laminated onto the skin like a temporary transfer tattoo, according to a study published in the Aug. 12 issue of Science.

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Depression Tied to Moderately Higher Stroke Risk in Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Women with depression have a moderate but significant increased risk of subsequent stroke, according to a study published online Aug. 11 in Stroke.

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Cognitive Function Tied to Markers of Cognitive Reserve

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive performance is correlated with markers of reserve; but the rate of cognitive decline is similar in all reserve groups, with a difference in cognitive decline seen only in the high occupation group, according to a study published in the August issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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De Novo, Rare Inherited Copy Number Variations Tied to ADHD

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- De novo and rare inherited copy number variations (CNVs) are associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and include genes previously implicated by rare CNVs in other neurodevelopmental conditions including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a study published in the Aug. 10 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Novel Susceptibility Loci Identified in Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- An international genome-wide association study has revealed at least 29 novel susceptibility loci involved in multiple sclerosis (MS), many of which are immunologically relevant, according to a letter published in the Aug. 11 issue of Nature.

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Severe or Bilateral Carotid Stenosis Tied to Brain Atrophy

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic disease, severe or bilateral carotid stenosis is associated with the progression of global, cortical, and subcortical atrophy, according to a study published in the August issue of the Annals of Neurology.

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Typical Alzheimer Patterns Less Salient in Very-Old

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Certain cognitive and morphometric brain abnormalities associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are less salient in very-old patients than in young-old patients, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in Neurology.

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Race, Gender Discrepancies in Neurologist Care for Parkinson's

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Women and nonwhite patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are less likely to receive neurologist care than white men, and patients receiving neurologist care may have improved selected clinical outcomes and a lower likelihood of death, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in Neurology.

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Rivaroxaban Noninferior to Warfarin for Stroke Prevention

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Rivaroxaban is noninferior to warfarin for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, with no significant differences in major bleeding risk, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Poor Verbal Memory in Elderly With Low Ejection Fraction

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In older patients with heart failure, there is a significant association between memory function and left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), with verbal delayed recall and recognition most affected by an EF of less than 30 percent, according to a study published in the August issue of the Archives of Neurology.

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Subthalamic Stimulation Has Sustained Benefit in Parkinson's

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the motor improvement induced by deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is sustained at 10 years, according to a study published online Aug. 8 in the Archives of Neurology.

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More Neurology Residents Comfortable Using tPA for Stroke

MONDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The number of graduating U.S. neurology residents with experience, and who report feeling comfortable, treating acute ischemic stroke patients with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) increased from 2000 to 2010, with more residents having exposure to stroke teams and formal training in the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in Stroke.

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Cost of Interacting With Payers Higher in U.S. Than Canada

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Physician practices in the United States spend considerably more on interactions with health plans than Canadian practices, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

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Specific, Reliable Biomarkers ID'd for Alzheimer's Disease

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Specific serum autoantibodies can serve as biomarkers to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD) throughout the course of the disease with high sensitivity and specificity, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in PLoS ONE.

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Five MicroRNAs Highly Expressed in Symptomatic Plaques

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Specific microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly expressed in symptomatic atherosclerotic plaques, and may have a role in modulation of stroke-related proteins, according to a study published online Aug. 4 in Stroke.

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CDC: Neuroinvasive Arboviral Disease Incidence Studied

THURSDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- West Nile Virus (WNV) was the most common cause of neuroinvasive arboviral diseases in the United States in 2010, with La Crosse virus the most common cause of disease among children, according to a report in the Aug. 5 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: Age Range Expanded for Meningococcal Vaccine

THURSDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics), a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, appears to be safe and effective for use with the recently extended age indication, and is interchangeable with the other licensed meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-D (Menactra, Sanofi Pasteur), according to a report in the Aug. 5 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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First Treatment Solely for Scorpion Stings Approved

THURSDAY, Aug. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Anascorp, the first injection devised solely to treat scorpion stings, has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Medline Plus

Neurologic Lesions Common in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Peripheral neurologic lesions following reverse shoulder arthroplasty are common but usually temporary, and may be attributed to arm lengthening, according to a study published in the July 20 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Fast Ripples Possible Marker for Seizure-Onset Zone in Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In pediatric patients with epilepsy, high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) at more than 200/250 Hz (fast ripples [FR]) are better potential surrogate markers of the seizure-onset zone (SOZ) than HFOs at 80 to 200 Hz (ripples), with resection of the brain regions containing high-rate interictal FRs significantly associated with better seizure outcome, according to a study published online July 29 in Epilepsia.

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Lower Risk of Repeat Vascular Events in Young Adults on Statins

TUESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Young adults treated with a statin for an ischemic stroke of unknown etiology are at lower risk for subsequent vascular events than were those who are untreated, according to a study published in the Aug. 2 issue of Neurology.

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Midlife Vascular Risk Factors Impact Structural Brain Aging

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and obesity in midlife are associated with accelerated progression of structural brain aging, and decline in executive function a decade later, according to a study published in the Aug. 2 issue of Neurology.

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