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Category: Gynecology | Monthly Briefing

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August 2011 Briefing - OBGYN & Women’s Health

Last Updated: September 01, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in OBGYN & Women's Health for August 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Deletion in β-Globin ID'd in Fetal Hemoglobin Silencing

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A small intergenic region required for γ-globin (fetal hemoglobin) gene silencing has been identified near the 5' end of the δ-globin gene, according to a study published in the Sept. 1 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cost-Effective Perinatal HBV Transmission Prevention ID'ed

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- In hepatitis B surface-antigen-positive pregnant women, administration of lamivudine or hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) in the third trimester is a cost-effective method for prevention of perinatal transmission of hepatitis B, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Rate of Maternal Weight Gain Impacts Size of Neonate

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Greater than recommended rates of weight gain during the second and third trimesters increase the odds of large-for-gestational-age babies regardless of prepregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI), and gaining at a lower than recommended rate increases the odds of small-for-gestational age babies for all except the most obese women, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Undernutrition in Early Life Ups CHD Risk in Adult Women

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to undernutrition during postnatal developmental periods of childhood, adolescence, or young adulthood is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) in adult women, according to a study published online Aug. 25 in the European Heart Journal.

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Four Categories of Eligibility for Contraceptive Use Endorsed

TUESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Clinicians should assess the appropriateness of contraceptives for women with specific medical conditions or characteristics based on the four categories of medical eligibility defined by the 2010 U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (U.S. MEC), according to a Committee Opinion published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Increasing BMI Ups Atonic Uterus Hemorrhage Risk

TUESDAY, Aug. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of postpartum atonic uterus hemorrhage increases with increasing maternal body mass index (BMI), but there is no correlation between obesity and postpartum hemorrhage with retained placenta, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Public Sector Funds Large Part of State Obesity-Related Costs

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Between 22 and 55 percent of U.S. state-level obesity-related costs are financed by the public sector via Medicare and Medicaid, according to a study published online June 16 in Obesity.

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Erythropoietin Alfa Therapy Safe Addition in Cervical Cancer

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Erythropoietin alfa (EPO) can be safely used in addition to adjuvant chemotherapy and pelvic radiotherapy (CRT) for patients with cervical cancer, but it does not provide a significant benefit in recurrence-free survival (RFS) or overall survival (OS), according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Intervention Boosts Parental Involvement in Infant Pain Care

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Parents who participate in an intervention to increase involvement in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) infant pain management take a more active role in infant pain care, and have increased role attainment after discharge, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Exclusive Breast-Feeding Doesn't Lower Eczema Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There is no evidence that exclusive breast-feeding for four or more months provides protection against childhood eczema, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Loss of Jobs Means Loss of Health Coverage for Many in U.S.

MONDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For American adults who lose their health insurance coverage when they lose their jobs, the majority remain uninsured, delay getting needed health care or prescriptions, and report financial difficulties paying medical bills, according to a report published online Aug. 24 by The Commonwealth Fund.

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High Demand, But Minority of Ob-Gyns Provide Abortions

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, 97 percent of practicing obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) encounter patients seeking abortions, but only 14 percent perform abortions, according to a study published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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ACOG Guidelines Issued for Thromboembolism in Pregnancy

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women are at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism, which can be prevented, diagnosed, and managed according to clinical guidelines published in the September issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Expedited Partner Therapy Use Benefits Gonorrhea, Chlamydia

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Expedited partner therapy should be used in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) guidelines to prevent reinfection by treating partners of patients with gonorrhea and chlamydia who are unable or unwilling to seek medical care, according to a committee opinion published in the September issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Complementary Medicine Used More by Health Care Workers

FRIDAY, Aug. 26 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health care workers, especially health care providers, are more likely to use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) than the general, employed U.S. population, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Health Services Research.

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HPV Test Beats Cytology-Alone in Cervical Cancer Screening

THURSDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing for HPV16 and HPV18 strains may be an alternative and more efficient screening method for cervical cancer than liquid-based cytology alone; and bivalent HPV16 and 18 vaccine protects against anal HPV infection, according to two studies published online Aug. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Abstract Kreimer
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Pharmaceutical Ads Often Don't Adhere to U.S. FDA Guidelines

THURSDAY, Aug. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Physician-targeting pharmaceutical advertisements have low rates of adherence to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and provide inadequate information for safe prescribing, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in PLoS One.

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Botox Approved to Treat Urinary Incontinence

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat urinary incontinence in people with neurological conditions such as spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis.

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Olaparib Promising Option for Ovarian Cancer Treatment

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with olaparib offers a promising therapeutic option for patients with ovarian cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Hospitalization Ups Unintentional Discontinuation of Meds

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Hospital or intensive care unit (ICU) admission is associated with unintentional discontinuation of medication for chronic diseases, according to a study published online Aug. 23 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Drinkers, Smokers Less Likely to Adhere to Chemoprevention

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Women at high risk of breast cancer who drink alcohol each day are less likely to adhere fully to chemoprevention at one month, and cigarette smokers are less likely to adhere adequately at 36 months, according to a study published online Aug. 23 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Mammography Decline Linked to Fall in Hormone Therapy

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- The decrease in hormone therapy (HT) use seen in the United States is correlated with a decrease in mammography rates among U.S. women aged 50 to 64 years, but not in women 65 years or older, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Cancer.

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Persistent Asthma Tied to In Utero Smoke Exposure

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In utero tobacco smoke exposure is significantly associated with development of persistent asthma in Mexican, Puerto Rican, and black children, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Pediatrics.

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Predictor of Recurrence-Free Survival in Breast Cancer ID'ed

TUESDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with postmenopausal breast cancer, elevated pre-treatment serum beta C-terminal telopeptide (B-CTx) levels are significantly associated with shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) for bone-only metastases, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Allan Lipton, M.D., from the Penn State Hershey Medical Center in Pennsylvania, and colleagues investigated the association of bone-only relapse with pretreatment serum B-CTx of type 1 collagen in 621 patients with primary breast cancer, enrolled in a phase III adjuvant trial of tamoxifen with or without octreotide. Continuous or categorical serum B-CTx was analyzed (0.71 ng/mL cut point) in a stepwise forward multivariate Cox regression model, and adjusted for trial stratification factors. B-CTx and bone-relapse were examined by pretrial chemotherapy status. Participants were followed up for an average of 7.9 years. Bone-only relapse and RFS were primary and secondary endpoints, respectively.

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Pre-Pregnancy Weight Tied to Adolescent Asthma Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal pre-pregnancy weight and obesity is associated with an increase in asthma symptoms in adolescents, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in issue of Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

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Sacral Neuromodulation Safe in Refractory Urge Incontinence

MONDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Sacral neuromodulation is safe for refractory idiopathic urge incontinence in women, but the success rate gradually declines with only 15 percent of the patients completely continent after five years, according to a study published in the September issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Celiac Disease May Be Risk Factor for Infertility

MONDAY, Aug. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women with unexplained infertility may be at a higher risk of undiagnosed celiac disease, according to a study published in the May-June issue of the Journal of Reproductive Medicine.

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Half of Health Care Providers Recommend HPV Co-Test

FRIDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately half of health care providers recommend the combination of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Papanicolaou test (HPV co-test) for cervical cancer screening, but fewer than 15 percent follow the recommended guidelines of waiting three years for the next screening, according to a study published online June 13 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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CDC: Flu Vaccine Recommendations Unchanged

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination of all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States continues to be recommended for the 2011/2012 influenza season, as in previous influenza seasons, according to an Aug. 18 early-release report in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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CDC: 2010/2011 Flu Vaccination Coverage Studied

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Influenza vaccination coverage among health care personnel (HCP) and pregnant women in the 2010/2011 influenza season was similar to coverage for the 2009/2010 season, according to two reports in the Aug. 19 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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High Cumulative Malpractice Risk for All Physicians

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Physicians in all specialties have a high cumulative risk of facing a malpractice claim by age 65; although most claims do not lead to indemnity payments, according to a study published in the Aug. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Mesothelin Antibodies ID Ovarian Cancer Risk in Infertile

THURSDAY, Aug. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Antibodies to mesothelin, a well characterized ovarian cancer antigen, are significantly more frequent in women with increased epidemiologic risk for ovarian cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Parity, Breastfeeding Tied to ER/PR Breast Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Higher parity is associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative/progesterone receptor (PR)-negative (ER/PR) breast cancer in African-American women, but breastfeeding ameliorates this adverse effect, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Maternal Asthma Ups Risk of Perinatal Complications

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal asthma is associated with an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, including increased risk of low birth weight, small for gestational age (SGA), preterm labor and delivery, and preeclampsia, according to a meta-analysis published online July 13 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Sexually Abused Children at Risk of Genital HPV Infection

MONDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Detection of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is significantly more likely in sexually abused children than those without evidence of child sexual abuse (CSA), and increases with certainty of abuse, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Low Sexual Desire in Majority of Middle-Aged Brazilian Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Low sexual function is prevalent among middle-aged Brazilian women, with low sexual desire seen in the majority; and, low arousal and orgasmic function, each found in more than 30 percent of women, is affected by various factors, including presence of a sexual partner, according to a study published online Aug. 2 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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miR-200s Target Sec23a to Promote Breast CA Metastasis

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- A new role has been suggested for micro-RNA (miR)-200s in breast cancer metastasis, involving suppression of Sec23a, thereby inhibiting Sec23a-dependent regulation of tumor secretome, according to an experimental study published online Aug. 7 in Nature Medicine.

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Trastuzumab Ups Cardiotoxicity Risk in Some Elderly Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- In elderly women with breast cancer and a history of cardiac disease or diabetes, treatment with trastuzumab is associated with an increased risk of cardiotoxicity, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in the Annals of Oncology.

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Childbearing Patterns Differ Across Three U.S. Generations

FRIDAY, Aug. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Each generation of women faces unique sociohistorical experiences, which impact childbearing patterns across generations, according to a report published Aug. 11 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

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Evidence Lacking That Aspirin Use in IVF Improves Birth Rate

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin use for women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) cannot be recommended due to lack of evidence indicating effectiveness in improving outcomes, according to a review published online Aug. 10 in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.

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CDC: Lower Socioeconomic Status Tied to Higher HIV Rate

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of HIV infections appears to be higher among individuals with lower socioeconomic status in urban areas with a high prevalence of AIDS, according to a report in the Aug. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Heart Disease Risk Higher in Female Versus Male Smokers

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with nonsmokers, women who smoke have a significantly higher risk of coronary heart disease than do male smokers, independent of other cardiovascular risk factors, according to a review published online Aug. 11 in The Lancet.

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Interstitial Cystitis Subtypes Have Distinct Differences

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), the number of comorbid diagnoses/symptoms differ substantially between the ulcerative (ULC) and nonulcerative (N-ULC) IC/PBS subtypes and controls, according to a study published in the August issue of Urology.

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SNAP Feasible for Differential Fetal Gene Expression ID

THURSDAY, Aug. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Standardized NanoArray PCR (SNAP) technology can detect differentially regulated genes in second-trimester amniotic fluid supernatant, according to a study published online Aug. 10 in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics.

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Sleep-Disordered Breathing Tied to Dementia in Older Women

TUESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Older women with sleep-disordered breathing have an increased risk of cognitive impairment and dementia, according to a study published in the Aug. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Cell-Free DNA Fetal Sex Tests Most Accurate After 20 Weeks

TUESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Fetal sex determination tests using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RTQ-PCR) have the highest sensitivity and specificity for detection of Y chromosome sequences after 20 weeks' gestation, according to a meta-analysis published in the Aug. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Soy Isoflavones Don't Prevent Menopausal Bone Loss

TUESDAY, Aug. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Soy isoflavone tablets, administered once daily, do not prevent bone loss or menopausal symptoms in women during the first five years of menopause, according to a study published in the Aug. 8/22 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Birth Defects, Pregnancy Losses Tied to Childhood CNS Tumors

MONDAY, Aug. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Children with birth defects and offspring of mothers with multiple pregnancy losses after 20 weeks of gestation have an increased risk of developing childhood central nervous system (CNS) tumors , according to a study published online Aug. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Lifetime Eating Disorders Tied to Fertility Problems in Women

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Lifetime eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, in women are associated with fertility problems, unplanned pregnancies, and negative attitudes toward pregnancy, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Cost of Interacting With Payers Higher in U.S. Than Canada

FRIDAY, Aug. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Physician practices in the United States spend considerably more on interactions with health plans than Canadian practices, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

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FDA: High-Dose Fluconazole Tied to Birth Defects

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has notified health care professionals and patients that treatment with chronic, high doses (400 to 800 mg/day) of fluconazole (Diflucan) during the first trimester of pregnancy may be associated with a rare and distinct set of birth defects in infants.

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Prenatal Magnetic Field Exposure Ups Children's Asthma Risk

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal exposure to high levels of magnetic fields (MFs) during pregnancy is associated with increased asthma risk in the offspring, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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CDC: Many Hospitals Do Not Fully Support Breastfeeding

TUESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Only 4 percent of U.S. hospitals provide the complete range of support for mothers to learn, practice, and engage in breastfeeding, according to a Vital Signs report published in the Aug. 2 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Gender-Based Violence Tied to Women's Mental Health Disorders

TUESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Gender-based violence (GBV) is significantly associated with mental health disorder, dysfunction, and disability in a representative sample of Australian women, according to a study published in the Aug. 3 violence/human-rights themed-issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Endoscopic Instrumentation Linked to Insulation Failures

TUESDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Robotic and laparoscopic endoscopic instrumentations -- particularly robotic -- are associated with high incidence and prevalence of insulation failure (IF) after 10 procedures, according to a study published in the August issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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DHA Intake in Pregnancy Tied to Fewer Colds in Infants

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation during pregnancy is associated with reduced occurrence of cold symptoms in infants at 1 month, and influences the duration of certain illness symptoms at 1, 3, and 6 months, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in Pediatrics.

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Tamoxifen Chemoprophylaxis Offers Cost-Effective Benefits

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Tamoxifen chemoprophylaxis is a cost-effective policy which reduces breast cancer incidence, and improves life expectancy for postmenopausal women younger than 55 years, following active treatment, according to a study published in the Aug. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Menopause Not Tied to Diabetes Risk for Glucose Intolerant

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Natural menopause is not associated with diabetes risk and does not influence response to diabetes prevention programs in women with glucose intolerance, according to a study published in the August issue of Menopause.

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Major Depression Strongly Linked to Social Conditions

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Major depressive episode (MDE) is a significant public-health concern across high and low-to-middle-income countries, and it is strongly linked to social conditions, according to a study published online July 26 in BMC Medicine.

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Higher Breast Density Tied to Higher Breast Cancer Risk

MONDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Increased breast densities are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, especially in tumors with more aggressive characteristics, and in in-situ tumors, according to a study published online July 27 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

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