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Category: Family Medicine | Monthly Briefing

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September 2011 Briefing - Family Practice

Last Updated: October 03, 2011.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Family Practice for September 2011. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Aspirin Resistance Is Relatively Common Phenomenon

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Aspirin resistance is common, but poor compliance may contribute to a substantial number of cases of apparent resistance, according to a study published in the October issue of Cardiovascular Therapeutics.

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Topiramate Effective in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Topiramate effectively improves avoidance/numbing symptom clusters and re-experiencing of symptoms in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published in the October issue of CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics.

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Position in Social Networks May Predict Adolescent Alcohol Use

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who begin drinking alcohol have more friends and friends of friends who drink, are closer in their social network to more popular people, and interact with more friends and friends of friends compared to adolescents who don't drink, according to a study published in the September issue of Academic Pediatrics.

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Tamoxifen Use Tied to Diabetes Risk in Breast Cancer Survivors

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Current tamoxifen therapy is associated with a significantly increased incidence of diabetes in older breast cancer survivors, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Cancer.

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Three New Gene Loci ID'd for Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Three new single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified, which are significantly associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) susceptibility, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in PLoS Genetics.

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Physical Activity Tied to Excess Eating Via Executive Function

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity indirectly modifies eating behavior and may suppress overeating by strengthening executive function, according to a review published in the October issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Parents of Children With Down Syndrome Happy and Proud

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of parents and siblings of individuals with Down syndrome (DS) are happy and proud of their child/sibling; and those with DS are happy with their lives and love their families, according to three studies published in the October issue of the American Journal of Medical Genetics.

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Advanced Directive Discussions Do Not Appear to Affect Survival

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Having advanced directive (AD) discussions or the presence of an AD in the medical records does not appear to result in increased mortality of patients at low or medium risk of death within one year, according to a study published online Sept. 29 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

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Doctors, Patients Identify Tacit Clues in Their Interactions

FRIDAY, Sept. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Both doctors and patients identify tacit clues as well as judgments based on these clues during video elicitation interviews of health maintenance examinations, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

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Surveillance Info Sheds Light on Utah's Influenza Patterns

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The United States was hard hit by the 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus, and Utah experienced a particularly high proportion of severe illness compared with previous influenza seasons, particularly among certain subsets of the population, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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U.S. Nonelderly Mental Health Disability Up 1997 to 2009

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported mental health disability in nonelderly U.S. adults has increased slightly from 1997 to 2009, especially among adults who reported disability due to other chronic conditions and a greater level of psychological distress but who had no contact with mental health professionals over the past year, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in the American Journal of Public Health.

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Smoking Rates for Working Adults Down, but Not Enough

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Workplace initiatives to reduce smoking have succeeded to some degree, but certain groups of working adults are still smoking at rates much higher than the Healthy People 2010 target of 12 percent or lower, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Illness Associated With HEV68 Seen in Clusters Globally

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Human enterovirus 68 (HEV68), rarely reported since it was first identified in the early 1960s, has recently been seen in disease clusters around the world, according to research published in the Sept. 30 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Maternal, Cord Blood Folate Not Tied to Childhood Eczema

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal and cord blood serum folate levels are not significantly different between infants with and without eczema, but infants exposed to high doses of supplemental folic acid per day in the third trimester have an increased risk of eczema, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Allergy.

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Slow, Steady Rise in Stimulant Use for ADHD Since 1996

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- The use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased consistently since 1996, with greater use in adolescents and decreasing use in preschoolers, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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SSRI With Antiplatelet Therapy Ups Post-MI Bleeding Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Combined use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with antiplatelet agents, including acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), clopidogrel, or both, is associated with an increased risk of bleeding following acute myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Stratified Care May Be Best Option for Back Pain Patients

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Stratifying back pain patients by prognosis may be more effective and less costly than a one-size-fits-all approach, according to research published online Sept. 29 in The Lancet.

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More Frequent Doctor Visits Improve Diabetes Control

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- More frequent encounters between patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and physicians decrease the time needed to control elevated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Hip Fracture Increases Short-Term Mortality in Older Women

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- There is an increased risk of mortality within the year after hip fracture in women aged 65 to 79 years, and in those older than 80 years who are in exceptionally good health, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Food Patterns Tied to Systemic and Vascular Inflammation

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Diets rich in high-fiber, low-fat, and low-sugar foods are favorably associated with markers of inflammation, whereas milk fat and sweets and cakes patterns are associated with adverse effects, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Three Weekly Hyaluronate Shots Improve Ankle Arthritis

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three weekly intra-articular injections of hyaluronate are safe and effective for patients with unilateral ankle arthritis, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Rapeseed Oil Rapidly Improves Hyperlipidemia

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For hyperlipidemic individuals, replacing a diet rich in saturated dairy fat (DF) with a rapeseed oil (RO)-based diet for three weeks improves the serum lipoprotein profile, with reductions in triglyceride levels, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Prehypertension Tied to Higher Risk of Incident Stroke

THURSDAY, Sept. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Individuals with prehypertension are at significant risk of incident stroke, with the risk increasing substantially among those with higher prehypertensive values, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 28 in Neurology.

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Burdensome Transitions Impact End-of-Life Care Quality

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Burdensome health care transitions in the last months of life are common and are associated with poor quality end-of-life care, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cytisine More Effective Than Placebo for Smoking Cessation

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Cytisine is more effective for smoking cessation than a placebo, with a better 12-month abstinence rate and seven-day point prevalence of abstinence, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Immune Globulin Therapy Has No Benefit for Neonatal Sepsis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants with suspected or proven sepsis treated with intravenous immune globulin have no significant difference in outcomes compared to those receiving a placebo, according to a study published in the Sept. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Child Face Mask Approved to Help Prevent Spread of Germs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- A child-size, single-use face mask to help prevent the spread of germs in hospitals and other health care settings has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Cognition Similar for Standard, Intensive Glycemic Control

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive glycemic lowering is not better than standard glycemic control for preventing cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes, despite a higher total brain volume, according to a study published online Sept. 28 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia IDs Lethal Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is prognostic of lethal prostate cancer (PCa), according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Alternate Chromosome 17 Genes Detect True HER2 Status

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with breast cancer and polysomy 17, the true gene status of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) can be effectively determined by use of additional chromosome 17 fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) genes, rather than the HER2-to-centromeric probe (CEP17) ratio, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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DMARDs Found to Be Effective Treatment for Juvenile Arthritis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) may be more effective than ibuprofen or steroids in controlling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), but there is little strong evidence to support their long-term use, according to a new report released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Quadrivalent HPV Vaccine More Cost-Effective Than Bivalent

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Due to different efficacy and protection offered by the bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, the bivalent vaccine would need to be cheaper than the quadrivalent in order to be equally cost-effective, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in BMJ.

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Increasing Dose of Saw Palmetto No Better Than Placebo in BPH

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Saw palmetto fruit extract (Serenoa repens) at doses up to three times the standard daily dose has no greater effect than placebo on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) attributable to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), according to a study published the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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AHA: Tools, Challenges for Assessing Adiposity Identified

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) should be used as primary tools for assessing adiposity, according to an American Heart Association scientific statement published online Sept. 26 in Circulation.

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Fear of Childbirth Tied to Higher Odds of Cesarean Section

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Emergency and elective cesarean sections (CS) are more common in women with a fear of childbirth, even after psychological counseling, according to a study published online July 24 in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica.

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Calcineurin-Inhibitor-Sparing Regimens Improve Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Use of calciuneurin-inhibitor-sparing regimens immediately after kidney transplantation is associated with improved outcomes, including less delayed graft function, improved graft function, and less new-onset diabetes, according to a meta-analysis published online Sept. 23 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Operator Experience Tied to Carotid Stenting Mortality Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Carotid stenting in older patients performed by operators with low annual volume or less experience is associated with higher 30-day mortality risk, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Advanced Adenomas, CRCs More Prevalent in Men

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals older than 50 years, men have a significantly increased prevalence of adenomas, advanced adenomas (AAs), and carcinomas compared to women, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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U.S. Docs Feel They Give More Patient Care Than Required

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Many primary care physicians in the United States believe that their patients are receiving too much medical care, and that the pressure to do more than is necessary could be reduced by malpractice reform, adjusting financial incentives, and spending more time with patients, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Lower Cancer Fatalism Tied to Increased Cancer Screening

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Better self-rated health and lower cancer fatalism are associated with greater participation in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in England, and mediate the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on fecal occult blood test (FOBt) uptake, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Benefits, Harms With Off-Label Atypical Antipsychotic Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- There are varying benefits and adverse effects from using atypical antipsychotic medications for conditions which do not have labeling and marketing approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (off-label), according to a meta-analysis published in the Sept. 28 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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SF3B1 Mutations Linked to Myelodysplasia

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Recurrent mutations in RNA splicing factor 3B, subunit 1 (SF3B1) are associated with myelodysplastic syndromes, and are more frequent in patients whose disease is characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with its presentation at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, held Sept. 23 to 27 in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Caffeinated Coffee Reduces Women's Depression Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of depression in U.S. women decreases in a dose-dependent manner with increasing consumption of caffeinated coffee, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Abnormal Heart Rate Recovery Tied to Higher Mortality

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Abnormal heart rate recovery (HRR) after undergoing a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) exercise program is associated with higher all-cause mortality, but patients who had abnormal HRR at baseline and normalized HRR after completing the program have similar mortality to patients with a normal baseline HRR, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Circulation.

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Vitamin B12 Markers Tied to Cognition, Brain Volume

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Serum vitamin B12 markers are associated with total brain volume and global cognitive function, with homocysteine affecting global cognitive performance and methylmalonate affecting total brain volume, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of Neurology.

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Cell of Origin Key in Relapsed B-Cell Lymphoma Prognosis

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with relapsed/refractory germinal center B (GCB)-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) have improved outcomes when treated with rituximab, dexamethasone, high-dose cytarabine, and cisplatin (R-DHAP), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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ESR1 Expression Predicts Tamoxifen Benefit in Breast CA

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of ESR1 predicts tamoxifen benefit in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer, with low levels of expression indicative of tamoxifen resistance, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Colorectal Cancer Subsite Risk Tied to Fruit/Vegetable Intake

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) associated with different fruit and vegetable (F/V) consumption varies depending on the tumor location within the large bowel, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association.

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Asthma Prevalence Elevated in Youth With Diabetes

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma is more prevalent in youth with diabetes compared to the general U.S. population, and is associated with poor glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes, especially if untreated, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Reasons for Referral to Specific Docs Differ Among Physicians

TUESDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Primary care physicians (PCPs) and medical and surgical specialists differ in their reasons for selecting specific colleagues for referrals, with PCPs more concerned about physician communication and medical record sharing than specialists, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

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Tdap Safe After Tetanus-, Diphtheria-Containing Products

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The use of tetanus toxoid, reduced-content diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) is safe, with no excess reactogenecity and no need for caution regarding Tdap use within any interval of a tetanus- or diphtheria-containing toxoid product, according to a policy statement published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Remicade Approved for Ulcerative Colitis in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Remicade (infliximab) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat moderate-to-severe active episodes of ulcerative colitis in children aged six and older who haven't responded to other therapies.

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Cardiovascular Death Risk Increased for Childless Men

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Married childless men have an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease developing after age 50 compared with men who have two or more offspring, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Human Reproduction.

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Updated Guides Compare Treatments for GERD

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Updated, evidence-based, reader-friendly reports comparing treatments for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been released by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to help guide patient and physician decision-making in treating this condition that affects up to 4 percent of Americans.

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Point-of-Care CD4 Counting Cuts Loss of Follow-Up in HIV

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Rapid immunological staging by point-of-care counting of CD4 cells in patients with HIV reduces loss to follow-up before initiating antiretroviral therapy, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in The Lancet.

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GLCCI1 SNP Lowers Response to Inhaled Steroids in Asthma

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Expression of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at rs37973 correlates with decreased glucocorticoid-induced transcript 1 gene (GLCCI1) expression, which is associated with a reduced response to inhaled glucocorticoids in patients with asthma, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with late-breaking presentations at the European Respiratory Society Congress, held from Sept. 24 to 28 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Lower Walking Speed, Altered Gait in Overweight Women

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight, older women have altered gait and reduced walking performance due to poor relative strength and rate of torque development (RTD) of lower-extremity muscles compared to older women of normal weight, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology.

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Rate of Change of FEV1 Highly Variable in COPD Patients

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The rate of change of forced expiratory volume in 1-second (FEV1) is highly variable among patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to a study published online Sept. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with late-breaking presentations at the European Respiratory Society Congress, held from Sept 24 to 28 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

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Adjuvant Zoledronic Acid Not Beneficial in Breast Cancer

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with early-stage breast cancer, the addition of zoledronic acid to standard adjuvant therapy does not offer any benefit for disease-free or overall survival, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, held from Sept. 23 to 27 in Stockholm, Sweden.

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Generic Tacrolimus Safe for Liver, Kidney Recipients

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who have undergone liver or kidney transplants may safely switch from brand-name to generic tacrolimus with no change in the indices of liver or kidney function or rejection, according to a study published in the September issue of the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Diabetes-Free Life Expectancy at 18 Years Down Since 1980s

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes-free life expectancy at 18 years of age in the United States decreased in both men and women between the 1980s and 2000s, with obese individuals experiencing the greatest losses, according to a study published in the October issue of Diabetes Care.

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Distinct Prognosis for Gleason Scores 4 + 3 and 3 + 4

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- A Gleason score of 4 + 3 = 7 is correlated with pathological stage and increased risk of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP), according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Evidence for Nondrug Childhood Constipation Therapies Limited

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although there is a lack of high-quality evidence for nonpharmacologic treatments for childhood constipation, there is some evidence of effectiveness of fiber supplements, but not for effectiveness of fluid supplements, prebiotics, probiotics, or behavioral interventions, according to a review published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Fewer U.S. Hospitals Provide Free Infant Formula

MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of U.S. hospitals that distribute industry-sponsored formula sample packs decreased from 2007 to 2010, with the biggest drop in states with a higher proportion of sample-pack-free hospitals in 2007, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Pediatrics.

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Glycemic Control Risk Factors ID'd in Youth With Diabetes

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Duration of diabetes, socioeconomic status, extensive daily media viewing, but not physical activity are significant risk factors of poor glycemic control in children, adolescents, and young adults with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Diabetes Care.

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Hospitalization, Complication Risk Up After Prostate Biopsy

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Men who undergo prostate biopsy have nearly double the risk of hospitalization within 30 days versus those who do not, and the rate of infectious complications after prostate biopsy has increased in recent years, according to a study published online Sept. 23 in The Journal of Urology.

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Many Cushing Syndrome-EAS Tumors Found in Chest Cavity

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with Cushing syndrome (CS) secondary to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion (EAS) who attend a comprehensive cancer center, nearly 50 percent have tumors in the chest cavity, notably bronchial carcinoid and small-cell lung cancer, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of Cancer.

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Multilevel Hemilaminectomy Economical for Lumbar Stenosis

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Multilevel hemilaminectomy is a cost-effective treatment for lumbar stenosis-associated radiculopathy, and it improves pain, disability, and quality of life among patients, according to a study published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Early Interventions Prevent Child-Development Inequality

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- In low- and middle-income countries, exposure to psychological and biological risks compromise child development in children younger than 5 years, and parenting and center-based programs can improve children's cognitive and social-emotional development, according to two reviews published online Sept. 23 in The Lancet.

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Back Pain Outcomes Similar for Surgery, Cognitive Intervention

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and disc degeneration who undergo either surgery or cognitive intervention and exercise have similar results for trunk muscle strength, cross-sectional area, and density at a seven- to 11-year follow-up, according to a study published in the August issue of The Spine Journal.

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Total Sleep Time Tied to Obese Teen Glucose Homeostasis

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Inadequate or excessive sleep is associated with disruptions in insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in obese adolescents, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Diabetes Care.

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Cardiac Rehab Effective for Secondary Prevention After TIA

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR) is effective for patients who have sustained a transient ischemic attack or mild, non-disabling stroke (TIA/MNDS) resulting in significant, favorable outcomes in vascular risk factors including aerobic capacity, total cholesterol, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein percentage, triglycerides, waist circumference, body mass index, and body weight, according to a study published online Sept. 22 in Stroke.

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Stereotactic Radiosurgery Reasonable for Brain Mets

FRIDAY, Sept. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Salvage stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a reasonable treatment for breast cancer brain metastases, with a median overall survival (OS) of more than nine months, according to a study published online Sept. 14 in Cancer.

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Bed Bug Treatment Can Cause Illness

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Illnesses related to the pesticides used to treat bed bug infestations -- an increasingly prevalent problem in the United States and worldwide -- are few and far between; still, inappropriate use of the insecticides can and does cause harm, according to research published in the Sept. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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FDA Expands Age Indication for Boostrix

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded the age indications for Boostrix, the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), to include people 65 and older, according to an article published in the Sept. 23 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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SNP in SUV39H2 Tied to Complications in Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The minor T-allele of exonic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs17353856 in SUV39H2 is associated with retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes, and shows a trend toward an association with diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in Diabetes.

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Racial Discrimination Tied to RBC Oxidative Stress Levels

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Self-reported racial discrimination is significantly associated with red blood cell (RBC) oxidative stress, with the association remaining statistically significant for African-Americans but not whites, after stratifying by race, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine.

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Previous Infant Death Ups Subsequent Stillbirth Risk

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Women whose first pregnancy resulted in infant death are nearly three times more likely to have a stillbirth in a subsequent pregnancy, with black women having a higher risk than white women, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in the BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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Circulating Glucose Levels Impact Responses to Food Cues

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mild hypoglycemia activates limbic-striatal brain regions in response to food cues resulting in a increased desire for high-calorie food, whereas higher circulating glucose levels predict increased medial prefrontal cortex activation, a response which is absent in obese individuals, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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Schizophrenia, Epilepsy Share Bidirectional Relationship

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Schizophrenia and epilepsy share a bidirectional relationship, with patients with epilepsy more likely to develop schizophrenia, and those with schizophrenia more likely to develop epilepsy, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Epilepsia.

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Nocturnal Hypertension Ups cIMT in Youth With Diabetes

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Nocturnal hypertension in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes is associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Diabetes Care.

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Aortic Arch Plaques More Prevalent in Aortic Stenosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) have a greater prevalence of aortic arch plaques and complex arch plaques, with the presence of complex plaques independently associated with the risk of cerebral infarction, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Study Compares Great Saphenous Vein Insufficiency Therapies

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) and high ligation and stripping (HLS) are equally safe and effective in treating great saphenous vein (GSV) insufficiency, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Teen Exposure to Smoking in Films Ups Smoking Behaviors

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with higher exposure to smoking depictions in films are more likely to initiate smoking and be current smokers, even after adjusting for social, family, and behavioral confounders, according to a study and meta-analysis published online Sept. 19 in Thorax.

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GGGGCC Repeat in C9ORF72 ID'd As Genetic Cause of ALS

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- The GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat expansion in the non-coding region of C9ORF72 gene on chromosome 9p21 is the most common genetic abnormality in familial frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in a large FTD/ALS kindred; and, it is the underlying cause of a considerable proportion of familial and sporadic ALS in a Finnish population, according to two studies published online Sept. 21 in Neuron.

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PKCε Regulates Nicotinic Behavior Response in Mice

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Mice lacking protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε) show lower nicotine consumption and decreased conditioned place preference for nicotine, according to an experimental study published in the Sept. 20 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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BMI, Tibiofemoral Alignment Affect Knee Implant Survival

THURSDAY, Sept. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Proper tibial, femoral, and overall anatomic alignment is important for implant survival after total knee replacement, and a higher body mass index (BMI) increases implant failure rates, according to a study published in the Sept. 7 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

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Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction Cut Health Care Use, Costs

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in 2006, diarrhea-related health care utilization and medical expenditures for U.S. children younger than 5 years old decreased considerably in the rotavirus seasons, according to a study published in the Sept. 22 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Videos Prior to Spine Surgery Aid, Strengthen Patient Choices

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Watching an evidence-based videotape decision aid helps patients with lumbar spine disorders form and/or strengthen a treatment preference in a balanced, unbiased way, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Spine.

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Group Living Homes Provide Good Care for Patients With Dementia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Group living homes for older people with dementia provide good care, and stimulate the values of attentiveness and responsiveness, but residents, family, and nursing staff may disagree on the phases of taking responsibility for care, and performing care-giving activities, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Clinical Nursing.

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Exposure to Air Pollution Found to Up Transient Risk of MI

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term exposure to particles with a diameter <10 µm (PM10) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in the air is associated with a short-term increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) one to six hours later, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in BMJ.

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2006/2007 U.S. Flu Vaccination Policy Lowers Morbidity

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- The 2006/2007 influenza vaccination policy change in the United States to include healthy children aged 24 to 59 months has reduced influenza morbidit

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